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Old 10-01-2011, 04:04 PM
 
613 posts, read 817,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Absolutely. Reading has to be presented as enjoyable and fun from early on. Looooooong before school/reading class assignments.
Which is exactly my point. Reading was always an enjoyable, fun and DAILY activity for my kids prior to 2nd grade, right around the time logs/responses started. That's about the time they started to hate reading. Why? My kids had books introduced to them before they could even sit on their own. I read to them before bed and when they learned to read, they read to me or each other.

I have no problems with reading assessments of assigned reading, or even writing of assigned reading. But the nightly reading in our school district is specifically in place and designed to get kids to ENJOY reading, and I am saying that the required log/response does just the opposite.

As in the other thread, I challenge those adults who are currently reading so
A book for enjoyment, to read every night for at least 30 minutes then write a 2 paragraph response. I'll even provide the questions. Then let us all know if you still looked forward to reading as much as you did when not having to write afterwards.
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Old 10-01-2011, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,876 posts, read 40,022,423 times
Reputation: 48752
Quote:
Originally Posted by wsop View Post
Which is exactly my point. Reading was always an enjoyable, fun and DAILY activity for my kids prior to 2nd grade, right around the time logs/responses started. That's about the time they started to hate reading. Why? My kids had books introduced to them before they could even sit on their own. I read to them before bed and when they learned to read, they read to me or each other.

I have no problems with reading assessments of assigned reading, or even writing of assigned reading. But the nightly reading in our school district is specifically in place and designed to get kids to ENJOY reading, and I am saying that the required log/response does just the opposite.

As in the other thread, I challenge those adults who are currently reading so
A book for enjoyment, to read every night for at least 30 minutes then write a 2 paragraph response. I'll even provide the questions. Then let us all know if you still looked forward to reading as much as you did when not having to write afterwards.
Hah, you're barking up the wrong tree with me, since I actually do voluntarily write reviews of books read for pleasure, and enjoy writing about literature in general - writing about literature IS pleasurable for me, as a writer. I've also kept a journal, personally, since I was 11 years old, so "journaling" assignments were always as natural for me as breathing...not some torturous exercise.

I realize that this is specific to me, and that not everyone enjoys writing in this manner. But it's not a given that writing is punishment for all students. Many actually DO enjoy it. Not everyone thinks it sucks the pleasure out of life, or out of reading. I always understood/enjoyed MORE about the reading material through writing about it. Which was, of course, the entire point.
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Old 10-01-2011, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,179 posts, read 9,197,184 times
Reputation: 9528
I was a terrible bad awful Mom.

I used to read to my kids and show them the pictures. I even did voices for them... so did their dad, when he could. He was better at voices.

When the kids used to sit in my lap while I was reading my books, they would want me to read those to them, too. I'd tell them, "No. This is too hard for you." Then they would 'force' me to show them the words in their books, and demand that I teach them to read those words. We learned sounding things out, and root words, and on to suffixes and prefixes and how they changed things. (Thank you, Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein.) Reading became an adventure, a way to learn new things, new words, and what words could do as well as how one letter could change the words. Soon they had to 'show me' that they could so read my books. So there, Mommy!

hehhehhehheh... evil selfish Mommy trumped again by sneaky, crafty kids.

By the time teachers got to them, the kids were writing their reading journals - from memory. They'd already read the "age-appropriate" books...
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Old 10-01-2011, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,876 posts, read 40,022,423 times
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That was me, too, SCGranny. I remember when I was in second grade, and we had a reading club where the teacher had a big visual chart where we got to give a brief oral book report each day (not required, but voluntary), over a book we'd read and liked, and for each one, we filled in a segment of the chart. Most kids were reading short children's books. At that point, I was reading the Trixie Belden girl detective series of novels, which had numerous chapters...a big difference from what the other students were reporting on. I remember that my teacher, an avid reader herself, let me count each chapter as a "book" on the chart, and give reports on each chapter, rather than having me summarize the whole book, when other students were doing Garfield the cat books (hey, it was the 80s). The activity wasn't required, but the more kids participated, the more wanted to. We got plaques at the end of the year engraved with our names and "60 books," "100 books," etc. I know my little plaque is still in a curio cabinet at my mom and dad's house, along with various other childhood artifacts.

I learned to read a couple of years before I started school, being read to by my parents, and following along, and matching the printed words to what I was hearing.
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Old 10-01-2011, 06:40 PM
 
613 posts, read 817,846 times
Reputation: 711
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Hah, you're barking up the wrong tree with me, since I actually do voluntarily write reviews of books read for pleasure, and enjoy writing about literature in general - writing about literature IS pleasurable for me, as a writer. I've also kept a journal, personally, since I was 11 years old, so "journaling" assignments were always as natural for me as breathing...not some torturous exercise.

I realize that this is specific to me, and that not everyone enjoys writing in this manner. But it's not a given that writing is punishment for all students. Many actually DO enjoy it. Not everyone thinks it sucks the pleasure out of life, or out of reading. I always understood/enjoyed MORE about the reading material through writing about it. Which was, of course, the entire point.
Haha! I guess you're right, I am barking up the wrong tree since you enjoy writing so much. Writing has never been one of my favorite activities, and that's putting it mildly.
Maybe it's not fair for ms to blame the logs for my children disliking reading, but I can not find any other correlation. I'm a voracious reader, my home is filled with books. I love books so much I will rarely borrow from the library and purchase new instead, since there is always the chance I will want to read it again.

I was buying books when my kids were infants, first cloth, then plastic, then board and flap books and dr. Seuss, etc. My kids should NOT hate to read. I have done what everything to instill a love of reading and I've done it naturally because I love to read. So it kills me when I hear my child say he/she hates reading!!

I know I've read other posts of yours here on CD, but I honestly can't remember whether you have kids. If so, have any of them gone through a stage of hating to read? Any other parents here who LOVE to read but have kids who say they hate it?

It's hard to ignore the fact though that my kids actually enjoyed reading until logs became such a chore, and how now my dd again enjoys reading now that the log is no longer required
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Old 10-02-2011, 08:32 AM
 
Location: So Ca
14,369 posts, read 13,915,034 times
Reputation: 12301
Quote:
Originally Posted by wsop View Post
Reading was always an enjoyable, fun and DAILY activity for my kids prior to 2nd grade, right around the time logs/responses started. That's about the time they started to hate reading.
But wasn't it enjoyable because you read to them? Reading is not a natural and easy activity to learn for most children. The whole reason the logs are required is to get kids who are learning to read into the habit of reading. To get them over the hump of learning to read and into the ability to read fluently. The enjoyment comes later.

Quote:
I have no problems with reading assessments of assigned reading, or even writing of assigned reading. But the nightly reading in our school district is specifically in place and designed to get kids to ENJOY reading, and I am saying that the required log/response does just the opposite.
From the teachers I've talked to, from what my kids' teachers told us, and from taking literacy tutoring courses, its purpose is not to get them to enjoy reading.
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Old 10-02-2011, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,999,747 times
Reputation: 14519
Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
A recent thread has been sidetracked into talking about how to get children to read for enjoyment but also for comprehension. Many teachers use reading logs that require students to fill out worksheets every time they read a book.
It's been argued that this sucks the pleasure out of reading but it makes sense as a method to reading comprehension. Does reading enjoyment just come with time?

What do you think is the best way to encourage children to read for pleasure and with comprehension?
1) Make sure they see you reading for pleasure. Children mimic what they see.

2) Find books they like. Prefferably, ones their peers are reading.
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Old 10-02-2011, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,876 posts, read 40,022,423 times
Reputation: 48752
It's also helpful if schools/classes can incorporate free reading time into the day. When I was in elementary school, we had 20 minutes minimum every day in various teachers' classes where the only requirement was that we be reading. What we read was our choice. When I student taught at middle and high school level, in the school I student taught at, it was school-wide...every day, there was a break in periods from 10-10:30, for independent reading time. Kids could read whatever books, magazines, comic books, whatever they wanted, they just had to be reading. My mom's school did this, as well, for many years, but it's one of the things that got shaved off when everyone started to freak out about AYP. Because, God knows, kids reading certainly doesn't improve learning.

I have twenty minutes' reading time embedded into the end of my day in my special education classroom. Some students for whom reading is more problematic read along with audiobooks, and some like if I read along with them.
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Old 10-02-2011, 03:46 PM
 
572 posts, read 1,080,604 times
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This may sound uneducated, or stupid to some teachers here, but here goes. I have mild dyslexia and ADHD. I have a difficult time with comprehension. When I was first reading as a preteen and teenager, I would select books that had movies, television shows, or plays associated with them. Because even though the movies often changed plot points, you could get the general jist of a book based on a movie. Sometimes I even get audio books, especially with complicated reads, because I didn't have the comprehension skills. It took me years and years, and years to learn how to read for comprehension. I enjoy reading for fun. For required reading like Shakespeare (in high school), I would rent the audio play from the library, because I would comprehend it more if the book was read to me, rather than me reading the book.
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Old 10-02-2011, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,876 posts, read 40,022,423 times
Reputation: 48752
What you experienced wasn't a comprehension issue, it was an issue with processing in printed format. Your comprehension is and was fine, I've no doubt. Processing problems aren't uncommon. I've got lots of kids with the opposite issue...auditory processing problems. Read a book to them, and it's going to be no dice and result in frustration, because what goes in at the ears doesn't translate well, and/or it takes so long that they've missed a bunch by the time they process what they heard. The same kids don't struggle with comprehension when they read it themselves, because the problem is processing the audio input.
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