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Old 10-01-2011, 12:37 PM
 
2,920 posts, read 2,906,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
Ah, the straw man. So the children are left with whom? Alone? Of course parents work and travel. I'm assuming the teacher would accept work signed by the adult in charge.
Never mind.

Well, here goes one more time.

As a child, my sister and I were often left alone to take care of ourselves, sometimes for days at a time. The lights were on, there was food in the kitchen. We knew how to take care of ourselves. There was no adult in charge. This was at age 8+. Our parents weren't lazy. They were working.

My students often have parents who are working two minimum wage jobs to be able to keep the bills paid. The students are older, and many of them are responsible for younger children. The "adult in charge" may not be much older than the children, and some of them work too.

It might not be a part of your experience, but that doesn't mean that it's not real.
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Old 10-01-2011, 12:53 PM
 
8,240 posts, read 14,896,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
Never mind.

Well, here goes one more time.

As a child, my sister and I were often left alone to take care of ourselves, sometimes for days at a time. The lights were on, there was food in the kitchen. We knew how to take care of ourselves. There was no adult in charge. This was at age 8+. Our parents weren't lazy. They were working.

My students often have parents who are working two minimum wage jobs to be able to keep the bills paid. The students are older, and many of them are responsible for younger children. The "adult in charge" may not be much older than the children, and some of them work too.

It might not be a part of your experience, but that doesn't mean that it's not real.
I don't dispute this doesn't happen- but it's not the norm. There is a legal age at which children can be left alone. If the "adult" in charge is 16, then that is the person that signs the homework. If there is no adult in charge, the proper authorities are notified.
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Old 10-01-2011, 01:09 PM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,502,858 times
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I'm very active in my kids' educations, but I have a real problem with rote homework signatures as proof of parental involvement. Initialing homework is absolutely meaningless. I think it's silly busywork. Additionally, this tactic is commonly used in elementary school when children should be out playing after school. At that level, I firmly believe homework should be limited to free reading and math fact review. Fortunately, my youngest's teacher agrees with me.
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Old 10-01-2011, 01:26 PM
 
8,240 posts, read 14,896,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by formercalifornian View Post
I'm very active in my kids' educations, but I have a real problem with rote homework signatures as proof of parental involvement. Initialing homework is absolutely meaningless. I think it's silly busywork. Additionally, this tactic is commonly used in elementary school when children should be out playing after school. At that level, I firmly believe homework should be limited to free reading and math fact review. Fortunately, my youngest's teacher agrees with me.
FWIW, I agree!

Last edited by toobusytoday; 10-01-2011 at 02:10 PM..
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Old 10-01-2011, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
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If kids consistently have no adult supervision, such that there is NO ADULT IN CHARGE there who can initial papers on a daily basis, the school needs to know that, because the school is full of mandated reporters for abuse and neglect.
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Old 10-01-2011, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Virginia
7,893 posts, read 12,143,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by formercalifornian View Post
. At that level, I firmly believe homework should be limited to free reading and math fact review. Fortunately, my youngest's teacher agrees with me.
I have to say that's how I see it. Fortunately my school does too. Some reading and a few well selected math problems are plenty. The guideline is no more than 10 minutes per grade level. I don't see anything wrong with signatures. I have parents signing planners even though I told them at Back To School Night that they didn't have to do so.
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Old 10-01-2011, 02:16 PM
 
12,454 posts, read 27,069,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
If kids consistently have no adult supervision, such that there is NO ADULT IN CHARGE there who can initial papers on a daily basis, the school needs to know that, because the school is full of mandated reporters for abuse and neglect.
I agree with that^. Even if a single parent is working nights, there certainly should be some time that the parent and child connect, especially if we are talking about kids under 10 years old. At the very least, they could leave their homework on the kitchen table every night and the parent could sign it before they leave.

I find the picking up trash thing a bit strange. I remember Earth day at my son's school and his fifth grade class was assigned to pick up trash on the school grounds. There were two fifth grade classes at the time, each with 25 students. By the time the second group got to the grounds, there was no trash at all to pick up. I was the parent supervising and I remember (for once!) wishing there was some litter! Is there really that much litter that children could pick up trash day after day? How would that be supervised?
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Old 10-01-2011, 05:26 PM
 
15,744 posts, read 13,171,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
As I just said in another post, I find it problematic to hold children responsible for their parents' actions. What are kids supposed to do whose parents work all night, travel, or who are otherwise unavailable? It doesn't seem fair to punish children for their parents' actions.

The fact is that in our district, we have a significant number of children who are basically responsible for getting themselves up and to school every day. Some of them rarely see their parents or another responsible adult. Every child doesn't live in a nuclear family where the parents come home for work in time for supper, help with homework, bathtime, and a bedtime story. I guess kids in this situation are just supposed to suck it up and take the punishment?
Wow, if that is happening in elementary school at least it would be a great way to find out which children are being neglected so you could notify the appropriate agency.

Aside from that, it sounds like the OP is not a neglectful parent, so the policy is not really an issue.
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Old 10-01-2011, 05:28 PM
 
15,744 posts, read 13,171,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
I don't consider parents who are working two jobs to be lazy. Neither are parents who travel as part of their jobs. In both cases, they are unavailable to sign papers on a daily basis.
I don't think they are lazy either but I do think if they are leaving elementary school children home alone at night and during the morning, they are neglectful.

If they are making sure someone is watching the child, someone else can sign. It really is not an unreasonable policy at all.
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Old 10-01-2011, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Arizona
1,206 posts, read 2,094,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
I don't consider parents who are working two jobs to be lazy. Neither are parents who travel as part of their jobs. In both cases, they are unavailable to sign papers on a daily basis.
There is SOMEONE there to sign. That can be worked out with the teacher. "Mrs. So n So, I travel quite a bit for my job, but (fill in the blank) is there with my kids, they will be signing in my absense" And if there is no one there on a consistant basis watching the kids then the authorities need to be notified.
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