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Old 10-14-2011, 08:34 AM
 
Location: nc
436 posts, read 1,297,624 times
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Unfortunately I think DS is going to end up going for his ged instead of getting a hs diploma. I can't find too much info online about the ged. I'm mostly getting ads for private schools that offer ged instruction.


Is it difficult to pass? How much studying is needed for a below average student? Do employers really care if you have a ged instead of diploma? Do the requirements vary from state to state? Any other helpful info is appreciated.


Please keep any rude comments to yourself.
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Old 10-14-2011, 08:42 AM
 
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I don't know how much they differ, but you can go to the GED website for your state to find out.

GED in Your State - Official GED Websites in the United States

I see you are in North Carolina so, go here: North Carolina GED Testing

There are free online study programs and practice tests at the site, so you don't have to guess how much study he will need. You can have him take a practice test and see how he does.
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Old 10-14-2011, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Back at home in western Washington!
1,500 posts, read 3,757,527 times
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We started our GED venture by calling the local university admissions office. They were a wealth of information and state specific. We have an excellent program here - I hope you find the same thing in your state.
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Old 10-14-2011, 09:10 AM
 
Location: You know... That place
1,899 posts, read 2,353,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamom1 View Post
Unfortunately I think DS is going to end up going for his ged instead of getting a hs diploma. I can't find too much info online about the ged. I'm mostly getting ads for private schools that offer ged instruction.


Is it difficult to pass? How much studying is needed for a below average student? Do employers really care if you have a ged instead of diploma? Do the requirements vary from state to state? Any other helpful info is appreciated.


Please keep any rude comments to yourself.
I think this depends a lot on what he wants to do. I know from my POV as a hiring manager in an office setting, someone with a GED won't even get looked at. I can hire 100 people with Bachelor's degrees for $10 per hour. Why would I hire someone with a GED. *I don't mean for this to sound harsh, I just thought you would appreciate hearing the truth from someone currently hiring employees.*

However, if he is thinking of going into a trade, many times the trade schools aren't as picky as colleges and getting hired into those jobs isn't based on education as much as working in an office.

Has he told you what he is interested in doing for a job?
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Old 10-14-2011, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Summerville, SC
3,383 posts, read 6,850,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by num1baby View Post
I think this depends a lot on what he wants to do. I know from my POV as a hiring manager in an office setting, someone with a GED won't even get looked at. I can hire 100 people with Bachelor's degrees for $10 per hour. Why would I hire someone with a GED. *I don't mean for this to sound harsh, I just thought you would appreciate hearing the truth from someone currently hiring employees.*

However, if he is thinking of going into a trade, many times the trade schools aren't as picky as colleges and getting hired into those jobs isn't based on education as much as working in an office.

Has he told you what he is interested in doing for a job?

A GED, will hurt... but on the flipside, if he can get into a job with a future, as early as possible, you can do well. I have seen people make good money and be successful without finishing degrees. I have also hired people with their GED, that realized "life"*, and they were great employees and in alot of ways better then people with diplomas, and taking 1 class a semester at a community college thinking they are a student, so they can just half ass at life.



*By realize life, I mean they need to realize what the real world is like, not the fairy tail of school, living life care free and fancy free. But the fact that if they want nice things they will have to work, and work hard for them.
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Old 10-14-2011, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Back at home in western Washington!
1,500 posts, read 3,757,527 times
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The other side of the GED conversation is that home-schooling (at least around here) is becoming more and more popular. People just aren't happy with the way the public schools handle certain issues, so they choose to home-school. Most home-schoolers will end up with GED's (unless their parents pay the money to enroll them in an accredited online school to get a "real" diploma). The university in a neighboring city gives home-schooled kids the standard SAT tests for enrollment. For those going on to college - a GED should not pose a problem (when speaking of public U's / community colleges). Ivy league / private colleges? That may be an issue...
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Old 10-14-2011, 02:52 PM
 
Location: nc
436 posts, read 1,297,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by num1baby View Post
I think this depends a lot on what he wants to do. I know from my POV as a hiring manager in an office setting, someone with a GED won't even get looked at. I can hire 100 people with Bachelor's degrees for $10 per hour. Why would I hire someone with a GED. *I don't mean for this to sound harsh, I just thought you would appreciate hearing the truth from someone currently hiring employees.*

However, if he is thinking of going into a trade, many times the trade schools aren't as picky as colleges and getting hired into those jobs isn't based on education as much as working in an office.

Has he told you what he is interested in doing for a job?
Thank you for your input.

He wanted to go into the military but I know he won't have much of a shot with a GED without 15 hours college credit. I was thinking of having him go to the local community college in the automotive program since he's expressed interest in working on cars. I thought if he got some kind of certificate or diploma from the cc then he could either try to enter the military or find a mechanic job.
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Old 10-14-2011, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Summerville, SC
3,383 posts, read 6,850,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamom1 View Post
Thank you for your input.

He wanted to go into the military but I know he won't have much of a shot with a GED without 15 hours college credit. I was thinking of having him go to the local community college in the automotive program since he's expressed interest in working on cars. I thought if he got some kind of certificate or diploma from the cc then he could either try to enter the military or find a mechanic job.
Automotive is good, be careful with some of the programs. There are some schools, that cost a bit and in the end you will be changing oil at a jiffylube for $10 an hour. I would look into something that does not have a huge up front investment. Schools can be tricky at just pulling money out of you.

Also might want to look into becoming an Airframe and Powerplant aircraft mechanic(actually what I am with an FCC license as well). Its an FAA certification required to work on active aircraft that fly in the US.

It does cost some money, and does require a bit of dedication. I had to go to class 7a-4p M-F, hours are logged by the FAA, you start screwing off and missing stuff and you will fail, and have to make up the time. Even if you have perfect grades.

So if he is a little less disciplined, I would be weary of wasting the money on it. But something to consider after realizing his options and what he may have to do to get to where he wants to be in life.

Took me a few years, and some crappy years and money wasted in college on an accounting degree I didn't want to realize these things.




Might be worth having a heart to heart talk. Sit down ask him what he wants to do. Where does he want to be when he is 25, 30, 40, 50, Retired. What interests him. Ask him if he wants a house, car. Maybe try and help him understand the costs, and how hard he will have to work at a crap job vs, working a better paying job. Reason with him. Don't come down just help him realize what he will have to do for himself to get to where he wants to be.
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Old 10-15-2011, 09:43 AM
 
Location: NW Penna.
1,756 posts, read 3,046,088 times
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My nephew completed an online HS at the age of 22 or so. He is very high IQ and was extremely bored by HS and dropped out age 18 to self-teach himself things that interested him more, basically. He started to feel left behind when his pals all went off to college, so he got motivated. He's in community college now, for 2-yr business, and will go on for his BS but community college is dirt cheap way to get 2 years of college that will transfer. And he is building/rebuilding drag racers for income, so it's possible for a "poor" student to succeed whenever he or she finds some training program that's of personal interest.

I used the GED math review books to review algebra for nursing school exams (engineers have calculators and computers that do all that stuff for us, lol) and I think it's possible to self-teach anything that's in those books.
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Old 10-15-2011, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Summerville, SC
3,383 posts, read 6,850,056 times
Reputation: 1434
Quote:
Originally Posted by SorryIMovedBack View Post
My nephew completed an online HS at the age of 22 or so. He is very high IQ and was extremely bored by HS and dropped out age 18 to self-teach himself things that interested him more, basically. He started to feel left behind when his pals all went off to college, so he got motivated. He's in community college now, for 2-yr business, and will go on for his BS but community college is dirt cheap way to get 2 years of college that will transfer. And he is building/rebuilding drag racers for income, so it's possible for a "poor" student to succeed whenever he or she finds some training program that's of personal interest.

I used the GED math review books to review algebra for nursing school exams (engineers have calculators and computers that do all that stuff for us, lol) and I think it's possible to self-teach anything that's in those books.
I'll be honest I am a similar way.


I made it through highschool, B-C student, never really applied myself. Went to college for accounting, "because" got As in classes I liked, blew off and failed others I didn't care about, made it 75% of the way. Had a huge medical problem, and left school.

I was down for about 8 months, came back working same part time job, and worked to pay down debt I accrued.

Since highschool I was into cars, and such, its amazing how much I self taught myself, just out of interest. Got into a program that interested me, popped through it with a 3.89(grades slipped as I did 18 credit hours, 40 hour work weeks, and wife pregnant with first child), top student of my class, got a great job and been accelling at it so far.


I will say last online math class I took, I struggled. I do think self teaching math is hard. I am very good at math too.




Took a big "event" for me to sit back and realize life isn't a game. My whole outlook and work ethic changed. Made me a better person. Went form Bed ridden, $200k in medical debt, no degree, dead end job, had a girlfriend so wasn't all bad To....

an AA, few FAA and FCC certs. Amazing job, with amazing prospects, only student loan debt, bought a new car and paid it off, no more medical debt, great benefits, Wife, first child, and just signed a contract on my first house which is pretty damn nice.

All in just under 6 years.
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