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Old 10-16-2011, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,255 posts, read 4,908,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Americans are in rush and keep pushing academics early before kids are ready. When they want achievement, they delete play time and recess. Not doing exams in the early grades works better, but Americans want to test so they can see where the kids are.
Having taught both elementary and middle school I am opposed to pushing academics down into kindergarten. The concept of kindergarten developed by Friedrich Frobel was a "children's garden" of exploration and activity. Many prominent researchers that helped make public education a reality documented the value of play and socialization in early education. Putting all 4/5 year-old children on a rigid academic path does not improve their longterm educational development.

Nearly two decades ago it was understood that students in first or second grade could be as much as 24 months apart in terms of reading ability. Children were evaluated based on their readiness skills. Activities to promote reading such as read alouds, picture books, letter recognition, and phonics were used to help prepare students for reading. Now all students are expected to be roughly in the same place on the learning curve at the same time regardless of their differences in age, maturity or readiness. It doesn't make sense.
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Old 10-16-2011, 06:02 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
973 posts, read 1,440,978 times
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[quote=Lincolnian;21304115][quote=nana053;21295185]

Americans are in rush and keep pushing academics early before kids are ready. When they want achievement, they delete play time and recess. Not doing exams in the early grades works better, but Americans want to test so they can see where the kids are.

Quote:

Having taught both elementary and middle school I am opposed to pushing academics down into kindergarten. The concept of kindergarten developed by Friedrich Frobel was a "children's garden" of exploration and activity. Many prominent researchers that helped make public education a reality documented the value of play and socialization in early education. Putting all 4/5 year-old children on a rigid academic path does not improve their longterm educational development.

Nearly two decades ago it was understood that students in first or second grade could be as much as 24 months apart in terms of reading ability. Children were evaluated based on their readiness skills. Activities to promote reading such as read alouds, picture books, letter recognition, and phonics were used to help prepare students for reading. Now all students are expected to be roughly in the same place on the learning curve at the same time regardless of their differences in age, maturity or readiness. It doesn't make sense.
I agree totally. We have gotten totally out of "whack" with these youngin's. In Belgrade, Serbia, school begins for the students at age 6 or 7 after they are tested where they are in their readiness skills as you mentioned with some going to an almost K at age 5, but it is private. And then they go to first grade to a school that teaches/focuses on either English, French, German or Russian. So right away they are immersed in two languages, and having lived next to an elementary school when I was there, I can attest that they have NOT cut out having two recesses!

We are totally insane what we have done to our kids and what we expect them to do; no wonder they are burned out by the time I get them in high school.
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Old 10-16-2011, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,702,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
My basic observation is that in Finland they teach the child, while in the US, we teach the curriculum.

Different expectations = different results.
I owe you rep once I spread some around....

Has anyone seen anything on how their secondary education differs from ours?

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 10-16-2011 at 07:07 AM..
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Old 10-18-2011, 10:50 AM
 
755 posts, read 801,208 times
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Diane Ravitch offered her take on Finland's schools:

Ravitch: Why Finland’s schools are great (by doing what we don’t) - The Answer Sheet - The Washington Post
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Old 10-18-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Maryland
48 posts, read 66,903 times
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Default The Blind Men and Elephant Approach Doesn't Work

Evaluating Finland's education system without regards to its extensive welfare system and national personality is like the blind men and elephant story. You can't separate the three. The Finns wrote the right to an education and culture into the Finnish constitution. They pay a 51% tax rate on a $37,000 per capita income to have a high-tax welfare system that is intertwined with its 1st through 9th basic education system, ensuring every Finnish student receives high quality healthcare, childcare, optimal nutrition, necessary special education services, and fully funded education expenses. Americans would never stand for that. Feeding school children, ensuring all children have adequate healthcare and quality childcare, keeping class sizes low so that teachers really know their students, and getting a nurse, psychologist, and social worker to evaluate underperformers - and following through with a plan to address the underperformer's needs... That will never happen in America. It's just too socialist for our national personality.

From the Finnish National Board of Education:

Quote:
The Finnish education system offers everybody equal opportunities for education, irrespective of domicile, sex, economic situation or linguistic and cultural background. The school network is regionally extensive, and there are no sex-specific school services. Basic education is completely free of charge (including instruction, school materials, school meals, health care, dental care, commuting, special needs education and remedial teaching).
The Finnish National Board of Education - Education
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Old 10-18-2011, 01:21 PM
 
3,777 posts, read 7,165,585 times
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Quote:
Rintola will teach the same children next year and possibly the next five years, depending on the needs of the school. “It’s a good system. I can make strong connections with the children,” said Rintola, who was handpicked by Louhivuori 20 years ago. “I understand who they are.”
Don't forget this part.
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Old 10-18-2011, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,965 posts, read 98,795,031 times
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In part, the grass is always greener!
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Old 10-22-2011, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
973 posts, read 1,440,978 times
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Default Ted

Take a look at this.... I agree with all except only the top 10% being able to become a teacher, for in my experience, it takes more than just "brains" to be able to teach and sometimes super smart people just cannot relate what they know or even relate to people. However, I guess that this problem may be addressed since only a few are chosen out of that percentage. But, I still feel that others could be just as effective as teaching could be based on a person's talent and interest, like the are in Singapore. I wish, though, he had more time to discuss the "self reliance" aspect of the children for my mantra has always been that students need to take responsibility for their learning...and being self reliant is part of what leads them to this. And as an aside, what he mentioned that the first graders needed to walk to school and tie their skates... and NOT try to do all that we shove down our children's throats when most are really not ready for it. What ever happened to PLAYING???


TEDxDirigo - Alan Lishness - Indigenous Innovation: How Small Places can Change the World - YouTube

Last edited by Sagitarrius48; 10-22-2011 at 01:15 PM.. Reason: added comments
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Old 10-22-2011, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
973 posts, read 1,440,978 times
Reputation: 1086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Member1 View Post

I love this woman and do not understand why NO ONE IN WASHINGTON ever listens to her as she (and Linda Darling-Hammond) has been expousing changes for over a decade.

This was a great article and thanks for posting it.
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Old 10-22-2011, 05:56 PM
 
1,428 posts, read 2,772,068 times
Reputation: 1460
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenshoes View Post
Evaluating Finland's education system without regards to its extensive welfare system and national personality is like the blind men and elephant story. You can't separate the three. The Finns wrote the right to an education and culture into the Finnish constitution. They pay a 51% tax rate on a $37,000 per capita income to have a high-tax welfare system that is intertwined with its 1st through 9th basic education system, ensuring every Finnish student receives high quality healthcare, childcare, optimal nutrition, necessary special education services, and fully funded education expenses. Americans would never stand for that. Feeding school children, ensuring all children have adequate healthcare and quality childcare, keeping class sizes low so that teachers really know their students, and getting a nurse, psychologist, and social worker to evaluate underperformers - and following through with a plan to address the underperformer's needs... That will never happen in America. It's just too socialist for our national personality.
And at some level, let's face it, if people are poor and underperforming, there are lots of folks out there who think it's their fault and they deserve it. Because, you know, every single rich person out there really busted their backs to go from absolutely nothing with no one's help to fabulous wealth, so that means everyone else can do exactly the same.
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