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Old 10-18-2011, 02:03 PM
 
27,993 posts, read 19,660,990 times
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Let me preface this thread by stating I do not find anything wrong with the very occasional use of television as a reward or diversion in school.


My son's school uses the television way too much, IMO. The most irksome is the librarian's use of it. They watch TV during every (once a week) library session. IMO, I think the library session should be used teaching the Dewey Decimal System, learning about different categories of books and I don't know, reading.

The school also uses it for recess when it's raining or snowing out. I don't see why. When I was in school (haha, I know!) we went outside as the long as the weather wasn't extreme. If it were extreme, we just got recess inside the classroom sans television. We were allowed to get up & socialize for our 20 minute break.

Last week, on a Wednesday afternoon, the *only* thing the kids did was watch Kung Fu Panda! Why? What possible educational purpose could this serve?
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Old 10-18-2011, 02:22 PM
 
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I think I'd be a little upset if my kids were being shown Kung Fu Panda in school.

We had a closed-circut television system in the elementary school I went to which was run by the school district. So I watched a lot of TV. But we were getting Spanish lessons, history lessons, lots of Disney educational videos. But commercial TV or movies shown during school hours? Can't say I'd like that.

Mags: Has the school told you why they do this?
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Old 10-18-2011, 02:27 PM
 
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When I was teaching I used video clips (and sometimes movies) as teaching tools. Usually they were used in conjunction with the curriculum and not just as something to keep the kids occupied.

I am not a fan of tv watching in school unless it is related to the curriculum. Even if you need to keep kids occupied and quiet (like when you have a sub) it is not that difficult to find video material that is curriculum related and attach some educational assignment to the video material.

As far as using it in library that seems strange. It would seem that the perfect assignment in library would be READING.
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Old 10-18-2011, 05:05 PM
 
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No, the school has not told me why they do it and I don't know who to ask & how. Momma, I agree that TV at school should be used as an educational resource.
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Old 10-18-2011, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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You might broach the subject by contacting the teacher and letting her/him know that Junior came home and said all he did in the afternoon was watch TV and that you want to check on the accuracy of his statement.
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Old 10-19-2011, 05:06 AM
 
27,993 posts, read 19,660,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
You might broach the subject by contacting the teacher and letting her/him know that Junior came home and said all he did in the afternoon was watch TV and that you want to check on the accuracy of his statement.
Simple and easy. Parent Teacher Conferences in our district are tomorrow. I'll ask then.
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Old 10-19-2011, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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There are a lot of curriculum-appropriate uses of media...I know with my students, at times, when we read a book that has a film adaptation that's school-appropriate, we may watch the film after reading it (and, at times, going to a stage version locally has been possible). Then we do discussion and assignments where we compare and contrast how things differed, how certain events or characters were interpreted, etc. It's worthwhile. My job skills class (developmentally disabled kids) was studying the interviewing process/conducting one's self professionally, and one of my team teachers put together a montage of clips from The Office, from when the staff was interviewing for Michael Scott's replacement, (edited for school appropriateness, obviously), and it was fun to see my kids identify what over-the-top stuff was wrong with each interviewer, and then act out how to do it correctly. Obviously, it wasn't my sole or main teaching tool for "how to interview," but it was a fun auxiliary activity that kept them interested.

Obviously, not every use of media is being done appropriately (while there are a lot of cool historical movies out there, I did have a high school history teacher who definitely preferred to substitute TEACHING about the Holocaust, the Truman administration, etc. with just throwing on movies like Schindler's List and Truman exclusively, and sitting back), but there are ways to work things in, and lots of potential teaching tools.
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Old 10-19-2011, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,821 posts, read 39,387,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
You might broach the subject by contacting the teacher and letting her/him know that Junior came home and said all he did in the afternoon was watch TV and that you want to check on the accuracy of his statement.
A good thing to look into.

I had one student in particular in my sp. ed classes who reported home that "All we do is watch movies in school," and when home inquired about the validity of that statement, I was able to explain that he was referring to a supplemental BrainPop video that is often used in science class to accompany lectures and labs, to provide additional enrichment activities. Not exactly "watching movies" all day, but easy enough to clear up the miscommunication. We have a lot of technology and media that's worthwhile for supplemental educational use, so obviously we take advantage of those resources.
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