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Old 11-08-2011, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,172,790 times
Reputation: 2726

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I also find it interesting that schools don't teach anything about health. Even though obesity among teens (and all people) has been rising. Wouldn't you think that rising obesity would be met with rising health education? Health should be 1/3 of the cirriculum.

-Mind/body connection? Curiously absent. Yoga? Absent.

-Basic nutrition. Not a 4 food groups pyramid chart. Something real.

-The difference between eastern and western medicine. Why is this absent?

The whole philosophy of health seems incredibly backwards. They treat it as if every student is 16-18, perfect height, weight.

I think teaching health would highlight the vast differences among people. I.e. minority groups vs white or asian. Some people get diabetes much higher than others. It would open up a can of worms that our extremely politically correct schools probably don't want to open.

Its funny, you don't even learn about simple breathing exercises in school. I think it would also run contrary to the pharmaceutical companies. Can you get as many kids on drugs...if they know how to control their own health? Hmmm...

 
Old 11-08-2011, 01:23 PM
 
12,606 posts, read 28,053,147 times
Reputation: 7140
Again, some schools do have health. Our school district has LOTS of health classes including two full years of health in HS that covers everything from sexual diseases to drugs to healthy living through proper nutrition and exercise - and that's just HS.
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Old 11-08-2011, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,172,790 times
Reputation: 2726
I don't think health classes have been rising at the rate of obesity. Isn't it a crisis?

-Why is recess or PE the same amount of time as it was 30-40 years ago, if kids today are bigger (and presumably need more time to exercise?).

-I don't think schools teach kids how to investigate or question health research, health topics, etc. What about fad diets? I don't think kids are getting enough of a real education in science...to know the effects of protein diets, low carb, etc.

-Plus alternative medicine.

Maybe as important as health is the influence of pharmacuetical and food companies in this country (i.e. the dairy industry). That would be a whole semester.
 
Old 11-08-2011, 04:12 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,920 posts, read 102,401,145 times
Reputation: 32974
Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
I also find it interesting that schools don't teach anything about health. Even though obesity among teens (and all people) has been rising. Wouldn't you think that rising obesity would be met with rising health education? Health should be 1/3 of the cirriculum.

-Mind/body connection? Curiously absent. Yoga? Absent.

-Basic nutrition. Not a 4 food groups pyramid chart. Something real.

-The difference between eastern and western medicine. Why is this absent?

The whole philosophy of health seems incredibly backwards. They treat it as if every student is 16-18, perfect height, weight.

I think teaching health would highlight the vast differences among people. I.e. minority groups vs white or asian. Some people get diabetes much higher than others. It would open up a can of worms that our extremely politically correct schools probably don't want to open.

Its funny, you don't even learn about simple breathing exercises in school. I think it would also run contrary to the pharmaceutical companies. Can you get as many kids on drugs...if they know how to control their own health? Hmmm...
My kids had to take a semester of health in high school. They also had some health ed in middle school, I can't remember now how much. Some of the topics you mention are covered in other classes, e.g. genetics in biology, nutrition in home ec, eastern v western medicine in world history classes.
 
Old 11-08-2011, 05:51 PM
 
12,606 posts, read 28,053,147 times
Reputation: 7140
Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
I don't think health classes have been rising at the rate of obesity. Isn't it a crisis?

-Why is recess or PE the same amount of time as it was 30-40 years ago, if kids today are bigger (and presumably need more time to exercise?).

-I don't think schools teach kids how to investigate or question health research, health topics, etc. What about fad diets? I don't think kids are getting enough of a real education in science...to know the effects of protein diets, low carb, etc.

-Plus alternative medicine.

Maybe as important as health is the influence of pharmacuetical and food companies in this country (i.e. the dairy industry). That would be a whole semester.
Well the other two years in our HS is taken up with gym..... I'm not understanding you John. Do you know what goes on in every HS in America? My generation was much less educated about all of that stuff and we had less of an obesity problem.
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Old 11-09-2011, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,304,193 times
Reputation: 6670
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1greatcity View Post
I was reading the thread titled "Job search education should be a requirement in school" when it dawned on me: Some of the courses taught in high school are not going to provide the average student with much he or she can really use in life. (Trig for example. Unless you end up working in one of the few fields which require those sort of calculations, really, what use is it?)

On the other hand, ALL students will eventually need to learn some basic skills in their lives-- everything from effectively seeking employment to understanding food labels. But unfortunately, most schools don't offer courses in these important things.

So I propose a mandatory class for all students called "Life Skills". I have here a brief outline of some of the main topics that could be part of the course study:

(first quarter), Learning to Work: creating resumes, applying/interviewing for a job, common job expectations, promotions, payroll issues, talking to your boss, work behavior, leaves of absence, jury duty, unemployment compensation, retirement...

(second quarter), Health Matters: nutrition, meal planning, reading food labels, coping with illness, family planning, parenting skills, understanding medical forms, basic OTC drugs, how to talk to your doctor, basic first aid...

(third quarter), The Business of Life: banking, applying for credit, life insurance, investing, bankrupcy, filing taxes, wills and estates, renting an apartment, mortgages,...

(fourth quarter), Safety & Maintenance: fire safety, emergency preparation, basic home maintenance, basic auto maintenance, CPR, home protection, basic self-defense techniques...

Granted, SOME of the topics listed might be covered in other classes, such as Home Economics, Shop, Health, Business, etc. But those kinds of classes are usually electives, not mandatory.

My proposal is that every student should be taught these basic skills of life. Think of all the advantages this would bring to each and every person as they begin to find their way through this big, complicated world of ours.
It depends. The first quarter was not covered at all in my high school career, and could easily be made into a class. However, experience is the best teacher for these types of matters, and the content learned in a classroom is often forgotten. Many of these things would be learned at work - most students where I went to high school had a job by the time they were 16.

As for the second quarter, that was taught in my mandatory 10th grade health class, which was best known as "sex ed" (and the teacher used materials from a wide variety of sources: we were shown both videos from Focus on the Family and Planned Parenthood), but also covered other aspects of health. I remember having to memorize the various types of heart rhythm! Some other aspects of the class were covered in my middle school "Family and Consumer Science" (the updated version of "Home Economics") class, which was mandatory.

I see your strongest point in making a class that integrates the third quarter. We had an elective in high school, "Investing in Your Financial Future", which probably covered much of the proposed material, although I did not take it.

Some of your fourth quarter is taught in various classes and presentations.

Many of the "life skills" are (supposed to be) taught across the curriculum. This means that, for example, interest and principle could be taught in math class, or certain natural disaster preparedness in science class. Also, you left out broader life skills, e.g. organization, which my class was (painfully) instructed in by "notebook checks" (a routine inspection of your folder or notebook for proper organization and neatness) and the like.
 
Old 11-09-2011, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,304,193 times
Reputation: 6670
Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
I don't think health classes have been rising at the rate of obesity. Isn't it a crisis?

-Why is recess or PE the same amount of time as it was 30-40 years ago, if kids today are bigger (and presumably need more time to exercise?).

-I don't think schools teach kids how to investigate or question health research, health topics, etc. What about fad diets? I don't think kids are getting enough of a real education in science...to know the effects of protein diets, low carb, etc.

-Plus alternative medicine.

Maybe as important as health is the influence of pharmacuetical and food companies in this country (i.e. the dairy industry). That would be a whole semester.
A fallacy that seems to be widespread in our society is that if you teach kids to do something, they'll do it.

The fact is that most students study not for love of knowledge but to get good grades and therefore improve their chances of success in society. They do all their homework on time and study diligently for the tests, but when the school year's over they barely remember anything. Expecting that students will retain enough knowledge they studied in Biology Class to make informed decisions about diets in the future is probably unrealistic.

Likewise, you can teach kids all you want about healthy eating and nutrition, but only those interested - who are perhaps less likely to become obese in the first place - will take heed. The rest will do the minimum to pass while maintaining unhealthy eating behaviors. You can tell kids to abstain from sex - or to practice so-called "safe sex" - but most will have sex and many will not take the necessary "precautions", and those that abstain probably come from religious families and would have been likely to abstain if they were not taught abstinence, and those that practice "safe sex" probably have heard of contraception and the like before from classmates.
 
Old 11-12-2011, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,408 posts, read 16,446,843 times
Reputation: 8773
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
A fallacy that seems to be widespread in our society is that if you teach kids to do something, they'll do it.

The fact is that most students study not for love of knowledge but to get good grades and therefore improve their chances of success in society. They do all their homework on time and study diligently for the tests, but when the school year's over they barely remember anything. Expecting that students will retain enough knowledge they studied in Biology Class to make informed decisions about diets in the future is probably unrealistic.

Likewise, you can teach kids all you want about healthy eating and nutrition, but only those interested - who are perhaps less likely to become obese in the first place - will take heed. The rest will do the minimum to pass while maintaining unhealthy eating behaviors. You can tell kids to abstain from sex - or to practice so-called "safe sex" - but most will have sex and many will not take the necessary "precautions", and those that abstain probably come from religious families and would have been likely to abstain if they were not taught abstinence, and those that practice "safe sex" probably have heard of contraception and the like before from classmates.
I think your arguments follow patterns of logic, but do not necessarily hold true. In my high school years one of the biggest complaints was that what we were learning was not relevant to real life. I think teachers must always struggle with that. Kids, without much life experience, really do not know where the future will take them, and which parts of their education may be required later on.

I think there are always a portion of students who take their studies to heart and treat them seriously, and there will likewise be a group who will think just the opposite. A teacher's job is to try to 'get' to them all, with full knowledge that that probably will not happen. This is no reason to throw in the towel.

Ideally, in my opinion, a curriculum would be tailored to the needs of each child, with emphasis on exercise and diet classes for the fatties, financial wisdom classes for poorer kids psychology classes with a lot of group sharing for bullies, etc.
 
Old 11-13-2011, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
2 posts, read 3,800 times
Reputation: 17
Come on, leave it all up the the schools?
Where are the parents on this process?
Why aren't YOU educating them and MAKING them follow through?
It's the SCHOOLS/TEACHERS fault and responsiblity?
Be responsible, do your part in making sure your kids and your neighbor's kids learn and follow through.
 
Old 11-13-2011, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Arizona High Desert
4,639 posts, read 5,090,973 times
Reputation: 2757
Living is an art, and not a science because times change.
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