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Old 11-06-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,835 posts, read 39,594,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Texas is weird because the districts are all over the place not in particular cities.

In Illinois, the city boundaries and district boundaries mostly matched up, although we did have a part of our town that was in our district, but theoretically in a different town. The borders were very close so it seemed as if it was in the same town even though the postal addresses were different.
I grew up in Illinois, and rural consolidation played a role in our district boundaries. When I was a small child, there were numerous rural high schools serving small farming communities and the outlying rural route districts surrounding them. Some of these communities had populations of only a couple hundred, and had tiny classes in their schools, with the average graduating class being 12 or fewer. As I grew up, these schools closed over time, due to the cost of keeping a school open and staffed to serve so few students. So those of us who would have attended these smaller schools were sent to consolidated high schools in the largest of the small towns. It's still that way today. School is in town A, and serves students from town A, as well as those bused in from rural municipalities B, C, D, E, F, and G, which are all much smaller, and whose schools were closed in the past 25 years or so. So kids going to school in town A are definitely not all residents of town A.
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:58 AM
 
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I disagree that school districts and municipal borders in IL generally line up. Often the school districts were set when the neighborhood was mostly cow pasture. When they were developed they were generally annexed wholly. This resulted in neighboring kids going to different schools. In some cases a few homes were in one district and got grandfathered in. Oak Brook is an extreme example, divided into four districts. I understand it takes years of effort and boatloads of legal fees to change school boundaries.
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Old 11-07-2011, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,835 posts, read 39,594,721 times
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It also typically takes voter referendum.
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