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Old 11-16-2011, 07:58 PM
 
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Yes! I like the subject title, here. Oh, a rainy day, warm cup of tea or chosen beverage, and sorta "cuddling" a good book!

Do any of you smell your book pages? Always have, especially when they are new, and some of the oldest ones smell a tad like Grandmother, in our case, calling her "Nanny's" house. Mmm, and it's wintertime so this is a great time to raise the awareness of our appreciation for our books, and yes, here I sit in front of this thing but am almost done with my work at my desk.
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Old 11-16-2011, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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to you, Stepka!

We had a limit on buying toys for my boys, but any shopping trip with DH would include a trip to the book store, and they could buy anything they wanted. Even comic books were fair game.

DH and I both read. All the time. We are never without a book --- just in case a spare moment happens with nothing else to do.

DH had difficulty learning to read. His Dad, a raving bibliophile, paid DH for each letter of the alphabet he learned. DH managed to do quite well in college and grad school, despite his rocky start.

We did not try to "teach" our sons to read, but we read to them and they picked up a good bit before starting kindergarten. We let the school do the formal teaching.

Now, neither boy reads as much as DH and I do. They have other interests, and reading for pleasure is just not something upon which they place a heavy priority.

I agree to letting the child take the lead. Those that want to learn will do so, probably with just parental facilitation rather than formal teaching.

I do not remember how old I was when I learned to read. I cannot remember not being able to.

And if anyone ever wanted to really punish me for something, the worst thing he could do would be to take away my books.
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Old 11-16-2011, 10:00 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,475 posts, read 16,442,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
to you, Stepka!

I agree to letting the child take the lead. Those that want to learn will do so, probably with just parental facilitation rather than formal teaching.

I do not remember how old I was when I learned to read. I cannot remember not being able to.

And if anyone ever wanted to really punish me for something, the worst thing he could do would be to take away my books.
Thank you for that. I do remember teaching myself to read in first grade. While the other kids were working on their worksheets, which bored me to death, I pretended to be finished with my work and snuck over to read the picture dictionary. I'm guessing I didn't learn by phonics but whatever it was, it worked for me, b/c I'm a big bookworm. I hear you on the punishment too but I bet you could have found a way to read, even if it was the cereal box or a physics textbook.

One thing I'm wondering though, is why people are so averse to the idea of teaching one's own child to read? I'm guessing that the prima donna parents have had a lot to do with that, since many here seem to think that the only possible reason you could have for teaching them is bragging rights. (Not accusing you of that Suzy.) My dd's were learning to read on their own, it's true, but it was a slow process, and with the Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons book, I had the younger dd reading chapter books in a month. Maybe I was just curious about how well the program worked and I do like to teach, so that was part of it, but a lot of it was the confidence that it gave her to learn something so fundamental, so quickly, and then she could just dig right in and get to the good part--the reading. I just don't see anything at all wrong with that, esp if I'm not pushing.

So the first dd learned by the way that you all have recommended on here--she knew her letters early and was able to write them pretty early as well. She knew all the letter sounds by K and could read some words on her own, but mostly she learned to read in school. The second dd learned to read with a direct instruction phonics program that I sat down and did with her the summer before K. Both girls are excellent readers and the first one doesn't read a whole lot of books but tends to choose quality. The younger one goes for quantity and a mix of good lit and not so great stuff but never descending into trash. So I don't know that teaching her early gave her any advantage other than that of being able to entertain herself sooner with books, which was good enough reason for us.
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Old 11-16-2011, 10:16 PM
 
Location: California
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We read to our kids and had them look at picture books since they were tiny, and they got to take books to bed with them. They went at their own pace and we were always big readers in our household. I ended up with one really amazing reader and one who doesn't like to read at all. I don't know that it would have turned out any different if I had pushed them, I doubt it very much though.

I rememeber a couple of "those moms" who bragged about how their kids read at "x" grade level and needed to be in gifted programs or whatever. Eventually everyone was else was reading at "x" grade level too so the shine was off and not a one of them was actually "gifted", they just read early. Either of their own accord or becasue the parents had them work at it. One kid had a mini meltdown in high school because he didn't live up to early expectations, pity.
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Old 11-16-2011, 11:03 PM
 
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I suspect that I wanted to do everything both of my older sisters could do, to the point of me being the earliest reader. I mostly taught myself, also. At 5 yrs. of age I took the "S" Volume of the old, Comptons Encyclopedia to Mom and told her that I had proven for myself what I had suspected, and no, Santa didn't exist, he had different names in various parts of the world, etc. etc. She said that I actually could read it well enough to get the message.

We homeschooled our two daughters and I do remember teaching the younger one but had allowed the older daughter to go to public kindergarden and therefore she had multiple teachers per reading, yet she had already picked a lot of it up.

Both of my parents loved reading and I thank them that I do, too, as well as both of our daughters.

I don't want a kindle, while one of our daughters has one, and yet she told me that she thinks it's funny that I keep sending her books through amazon though she complains that she needs more bookshelves. No, I don't do it weekly or anything like that, but had to send her and her sis the book about that young boy's NDE, titled "Heaven's For Real," this week.
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Old 11-17-2011, 06:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stepka View Post
So the first dd learned by the way that you all have recommended on here--she knew her letters early and was able to write them pretty early as well. She knew all the letter sounds by K and could read some words on her own, but mostly she learned to read in school. The second dd learned to read with a direct instruction phonics program that I sat down and did with her the summer before K. Both girls are excellent readers and the first one doesn't read a whole lot of books but tends to choose quality. The younger one goes for quantity and a mix of good lit and not so great stuff but never descending into trash. So I don't know that teaching her early gave her any advantage other than that of being able to entertain herself sooner with books, which was good enough reason for us.
So early reading is the summer before kindergarten? I thought we were talking two and three year old's. In the three school districts I've lived in with children they learn to read in kindergarten, so I don't think there's a heck of a lot of time difference there. I very much agree that once they start reading, the fun begins. I just think it shouldn't be pushed and it sounds like you found a way to make it enjoyable for all of you.

Here's a link to the book on Amazon you've mentioned Stepka. http://www.amazon.com/Teach-Your-Chi.../dp/0671631985 It certainly has a lot of good reviews.

BTW, I don't really think I'm sheltered. My kids may have been brought up that way, but they've certainly been exposed to a lot. My young adult daughter taught for a year in China and a year in Harlem. She traveled to Africa by herself to visit a friend who lived there. My oldest son did a back-packing/hitch-hiking/couch surfing/hostel four month trip in Europe this year and I've moved 10 times - four times with young children. Not that any of that has anything to do with early reading, but I don't understand why you would say I'm sheltered Stepka.
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Old 11-17-2011, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
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How is it no advantage to learn how to read early on? The earliest years of a persons life, especially the first 10 years, are years when you should be exposing them to learning opportunity as much as possible, as they are most likely to retain it during that time.

And by learning opportunities, sitting the kid down in front of Baby Einstein doesn't count.
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Old 11-17-2011, 08:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Oh, yeah.

Great posts stepka! (And I know exactly what you mean about bragging rights. Sometimes I have this burning desire to post: Well MY kids.....when someone is letting us know about their family genius. But I don't. Not only do other people not really care but my children deserve their internet privacy and I know what they did! )
+1, funny that those that complain about parent's bragging rights also go on, and on on how gifted their kids are and all their accomplishments.

Even if it never gives them an advantage later, I don't know what that has anything to do with it... it gives them an advantage early on. Not only was teaching my kids to read one of the most awesome thing for me to see their excitement, it was a great bonding tool for both of us. Why would I deprive myself or my kid of that. Not to mention that teachers have a hard time doing it by theselves with 24 kids in a class, and kids that are struggling spend time just staring at books they can't decode, until she can go around the room and help them.
If a child is gifted, of course they are going to catch up and probably surpass despite resources. Nobody is saying that all gifted kids read at 3, or that if you read at 3, you are set for life. What about the ones that might take a bit longer, does it not serve their confidence level to have some competence early on, while the gifted onces fly through it later? Not being fluent in reading is a major contributer to low self confidence in academics, and a reason a lot of kids decide they are just not smart. So those that are not gifted and might struggle with harder concepts in high school should just accept that reality in elementary school???? I just don't get it
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Old 11-17-2011, 12:06 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,385,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cc0789 View Post
Not only was teaching my kids to read one of the most awesome thing for me to see their excitement, it was a great bonding tool for both of us. Why would I deprive myself or my kid of that. .....

If a child is gifted, of course they are going to catch up and probably surpass despite resources. Nobody is saying that all gifted kids read at 3, or that if you read at 3, you are set for life. What about the ones that might take a bit longer, does it not serve their confidence level to have some competence early on, while the gifted onces fly through it later? Not being fluent in reading is a major contributer to low self confidence in academics, and a reason a lot of kids decide they are just not smart. So those that are not gifted and might struggle with harder concepts in high school should just accept that reality in elementary school???? I just don't get it
On the first paragraph.

And you've bought up some great points in the second.
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Old 11-17-2011, 12:57 PM
 
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This discussion is not about parents teaching a child to read, it's about teaching a child to read before kindergarten. In the school districts I've lived in children are reading sometime in kindergarten and if they aren't they are meeting with a reading specialist.
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