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Old 11-17-2011, 03:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
This discussion is not about parents teaching a child to read, it's about teaching a child to read before kindergarten.
I have absolutely no problem with the idea of teaching a child to read BEFORE kindergarten. In fact, truth be known, I'm a little shocked that some people are so against it.

I'm not for pushing it if the pre-kindergartner isn't ready but if he's asking to learn how to read I say, let 'er rip and get him a library card.
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Denver area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
So early reading is the summer before kindergarten? I thought we were talking two and three year old's.
The OP mentions the child in question is 4.

Count me among those "early" readers. I have no recollection of not being able to read. I also DO have recollection of being a bit bored during reading class in 1st grade. This was "back in the day" when reading groups consisted of groups of similarly leveled readers, sitting around a table and taking turns reading sentences aloud. "See Spot! See Spot run!" etc. I remember being quite bored, but it was only for a short time during the day and I could go home and read to my heart's content. I got over it.
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
I doubt there is a parent on this forum that would say, "Son, there is no way I'm going to teach you to read even though you want to. Go watch tv". Instead, I think most of us are envisioning setting a pre-schooler at a table with flash cards and lined paper for practicing letters. I'm guessing that "teaching" a child to read early is something in between. Certainly any parent that reads to their child with any regularity pointed out the letters, asked the kids to sound out the words, etc. My kids recognized some words before kindergarten and fake read a few books but within a short time in kindergarten they were indeed reading. I truly don't think those few months made any difference. So what formal work does teaching early reading entail?

And I don't think there was any peer pressure to not do well in school, at least not for my tend-to-be geekish kids, who hung out with similar friends. My kids traded books and we all attended library programs. What can I say, I work at a library.
I don't think anyone is talking about refusing to teach a child to read....
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Last edited by toobusytoday; 11-18-2011 at 10:38 AM..
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
The OP mentions the child in question is 4.

Count me among those "early" readers. I have no recollection of not being able to read. I also DO have recollection of being a bit bored during reading class in 1st grade. This was "back in the day" when reading groups consisted of groups of similarly leveled readers, sitting around a table and taking turns reading sentences aloud. "See Spot! See Spot run!" etc. I remember being quite bored, but it was only for a short time during the day and I could go home and read to my heart's content. I got over it.
Four is still a full year before kindergarten (which would seem early) so perhaps the OP and Stepka have two different definitions of early reading. Which is fine. In my mind, the summer before kindergarten is not much earlier then is traditional and frankly, the way parents hold kids back, a year before kindergarten could be a five year old.
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:25 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,377,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
I don't think anyone is talking about refusing to teach a child to read....
Yes, I've been following along with great interest.

Ivory seemed to come out agin' it but if I misunderstood her postion I'm open for correction. (I tend to read these threads at night when I'll admit to being tired.) As always, I'm here to learn.

(And, knowing Ivory, if I'm wrong I KNOW she'll correct me. )

Last edited by toobusytoday; 11-18-2011 at 10:39 AM..
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
The downside I saw was kids who were bored while the other kids were catching up. My kids weren't among the early readers but I watched friends go through this. Eventually, the other kids caught up but, by then, the kids who read early, for whom everything came easily in school because they had already been taught everything before starting school, expected everything to come easily and their parents were mad at the school for not keeping their child ahead of the curve. Some of these kids are in high school now and still struggling with study skills. They learned early that they didn't learn at school but rather already knew what they were being taught at school. It came as a shock when they had to actually learn it.
Can't say I experienced that. I enjoyed reading on my own even if what was being read in school was below where I was at, and teachers were ALWAYS willing to allow me to do independent reading on my own reading level...nobody ever took away my books because they were too "advanced," or anything. My second grade teacher, who just retired this past year, was a huge reading advocate, and had incentive-based reading clubs long before Pizza Hut developed the Book It! program. I remember her letting me read my beloved Trixie Belden mysteries, which were several hundred-page chapter books geared for young teens, and counting each chapter as a "book" for the purpose of reading club, since most of the other kids were reading books of Garfield comic strips (hey, it was the 80s) and getting credit. My parents also never expected the school to individually accommodate me just because I was working ahead of grade level...there were enough open-ended proejcts and assigments that I could work on at my own level, and there was a great extracurricular gifted program, which was much more educational than what was going on in a given classroom.

I think the main factor was that I wasn't then (much as I am not, now) one who gets bored, or one who depends on others (be they teachers or whomever else) to provide the stimulation. I'm good learning on my own. If teachers could point me in a direction, awesome...if not, I was already pretty equipped, and so were my parents.

Quote:
I've also seen kids who were "taught" to read early end up disliking reading. IMO, it's better to just let it be about being read to and enjoying the stories. Eventually, kids want to learn to read and when they are ready, they will.
This is exactly how I learned to read...by being read to as parental bonding. From an early age, I followed along, and learned to associate the printed words with what was being spoken, and before I was in kindergarten, was reading on my own, and spelling well ahead of grade level all through school. I taught my younger siblings to read the same way, before I was ten years old...by reading to them out of Highlights magazines. I now teach many kids with autism spectrum disorders to read with the same core technique, individualized to the particular child.

Quote:
I'm not a fan of "teaching" reading early because there is no advantage in doing so and who knows what the brain would have done if it hadn't been tied up learning to read. My gifted child read very late (6 1/2). Her doctor theorizes that her brain was just busy with other things. It got around to it when it was good and ready. Reading is developmental like walking or talking. There is a range of ages that are normal for learning to read (and 6 1/2 is within the normal range). You wouldn't push a child to walk early or talk early so why push them to read early?
For myself, learning to read at an early age wasn't something that was planned, it was an automatic, organic occurrence that was simply a byproduct of being read to with regularity...it wasn't like anybody was drilling me on phonemic awareness or running worksheets or choral reading programs. It's interesting, though, that your assumption is that early readers must have been forced to learn to read, or otherwise "pushed."
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Old 11-17-2011, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,747,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Can't say I experienced that. I enjoyed reading on my own even if what was being read in school was below where I was at, and teachers were ALWAYS willing to allow me to do independent reading on my own reading level...nobody ever took away my books because they were too "advanced," or anything. My second grade teacher, who just retired this past year, was a huge reading advocate, and had incentive-based reading clubs long before Pizza Hut developed the Book It! program. I remember her letting me read my beloved Trixie Belden mysteries, which were several hundred-page chapter books geared for young teens, and counting each chapter as a "book" for the purpose of reading club, since most of the other kids were reading books of Garfield comic strips (hey, it was the 80s) and getting credit. My parents also never expected the school to individually accommodate me just because I was working ahead of grade level...there were enough open-ended proejcts and assigments that I could work on at my own level, and there was a great extracurricular gifted program, which was much more educational than what was going on in a given classroom.

I think the main factor was that I wasn't then (much as I am not, now) one who gets bored, or one who depends on others (be they teachers or whomever else) to provide the stimulation. I'm good learning on my own. If teachers could point me in a direction, awesome...if not, I was already pretty equipped, and so were my parents.



This is exactly how I learned to read...by being read to as parental bonding. From an early age, I followed along, and learned to associate the printed words with what was being spoken, and before I was in kindergarten, was reading on my own, and spelling well ahead of grade level all through school. I taught my younger siblings to read the same way, before I was ten years old...by reading to them out of Highlights magazines. I now teach many kids with autism spectrum disorders to read with the same core technique, individualized to the particular child.



For myself, learning to read at an early age wasn't something that was planned, it was an automatic, organic occurrence that was simply a byproduct of being read to with regularity...it wasn't like anybody was drilling me on phonemic awareness or running worksheets or choral reading programs. It's interesting, though, that your assumption is that early readers must have been forced to learn to read, or otherwise "pushed."
It's fine if it comes naturally but when a parent starts asking about how to "teach" reading, it's not coming naturally. Kids do things at different ages. They should do what they are ready to do. Not what mom is ready to teach. IMO, education, before school starts should be child lead. My dd loved puzzles and making lists so she did puzzles and made lists. My nephew likes memorizing the capitols of states and countries and spelling words, so that's what he does. He's 4 and can spell words I can't but he can't read yet. He doesn't get the sounding out part. No problem. He has plenty of time.

If reading is what a kid really wants to do and it comes naturally to them, let it be. If it's not coming naturally to them and they'd rather be read to, let it be.
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Old 11-17-2011, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,747,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Yes, I've been following along with great interest.

Ivory seemed to come out agin' it but if I misunderstood her postion I'm open for correction. (I tend to read these threads at night when I'll admit to being tired.) As always, I'm here to learn.

(And, knowing Ivory, if I'm wrong I KNOW she'll correct me. )
My position is against "teaching" reading to a 4 year old. If you have to resort to "teaching" reading, I'd say the child in question either isn't interested enough or isn't ready. Either way, it's the wrong way to go.

I just think we need to quit pushing our kids when they're so young. Enjoy reading to them, they grow up way too fast.
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Old 11-17-2011, 08:56 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,377,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
My position is against "teaching" reading to a 4 year old. If you have to resort to "teaching" reading, I'd say the child in question either isn't interested enough or isn't ready. Either way, it's the wrong way to go.

I just think we need to quit pushing our kids when they're so young. Enjoy reading to them, they grow up way too fast.
Thanks for the clarification. Got it.
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Old 11-18-2011, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,823 posts, read 39,447,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
to you, Stepka!

We had a limit on buying toys for my boys, but any shopping trip with DH would include a trip to the book store, and they could buy anything they wanted. Even comic books were fair game.
This was the case in my house as well. Very thrifty parents, in most contexts, but if we went to a bookstore, or even with the Scholastic book order forms sent home from school, the sky was the limit.

I am also never without a book on me, to this day.
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