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Old 11-23-2011, 07:31 PM
 
15,797 posts, read 13,234,893 times
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Lumping all homeschoolers together is about as meaningful as lumping together all public schools. The differences within the groups is going to be greater than between the groups.
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Old 11-24-2011, 07:01 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
27,454 posts, read 15,137,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Parents certainly can have the expertise in the early years. As the kids get older, there is nothing in homeschooling that says you can't take a class on subjects your parents are not familiar with.

Many home schooled children actually have better socialization than their school peers because they have to learn to get along with all ages (age stratification is a real detriment in our current society - it was not so much when I was growing up, but now kids are almost never with kids of a different ages). Also most home schoolers attend co-ops for some classes and the kids go to art, dance, music and gym classes that school kids may go to outside of school. Sometimes they get to go during the day when regular school children have to be in school instead of waiting until after school. Sometimes they go to these classes during the same hours that other school children do. I do NOT think that kids need to be exposed to bullies in order to learn the skills to deal with them, btw. What they need is the confidence in themselves to know that the bullies are the ones who are weird, not them.
I can honestly say that has not been my experience with the home schooled children we encounter on our various sports teams, neighborhood, etc.

Not that they are all likes this - but the ones I know are woefully lacking in social skills and many in basic learning.

One boy did not know that PA (seen on a college jersey) meant "Pennsylvania". He thought it mean "Pa" (like Ma).

That right there made me thing I would never home school my children.

Now had I been exposed to the opposite end of the home-schooling spectrum ~ I might have felt differently. But I was not.
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Old 11-24-2011, 07:22 AM
 
18,856 posts, read 30,544,912 times
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Homeschool parents cannot be lumped together as a homogenus group. The group is as diverse as any other group. There are children who excel at homeschool, and parents who are highly qualified. I do think homeschool costs can be low, by utilizing libraries and the internet.
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:45 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 22,812,301 times
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I think the largest expense for homeschooling is the time investment of the parent; that's time that would perhaps otherwise be spent in a paying job, which means potentially giving up the equivalent of many thousands of dollars in salary and benefits.

As far as the list goes, I think the average for museums and field trips seems low, but realize that costs are going to vary depending on specific location. And given that many families who choose public or private school also belong to museums, go on "field trips" (outside of school, I mean), as well as have expenses for classes, supplies, etc., that's going to be money out the door whether or not you homeschool. It's really the potential loss of income that is the big factor. And that IS a huge consideration.
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Old 11-27-2011, 01:08 PM
 
Location: US
3,082 posts, read 3,344,561 times
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Your responses below are shocking. Your disdain for parents, with whom the bottom line of success or failure for their child's education rests, is also shocking.

I learn curriculum every single time along side my child when he has a question about or doesn't understand his text books or home work. We do research together to find the answer.

As the responsible party for my child's success or failure in education, the school and the teachers are my tools to insure success occurs. If my child would do better in a private school or even being home schooled rather than a public school, it is my responsibility and my expense, not yours.

I work very hard to be a good partner with my children's teachers. I follow all the rules the school, the government, the laws and even those the teachers set out for me. I take action at home to make sure my children's teachers are supported, when they are right. We both can agree there are plenty of parents AND teachers who should not be teaching. However, other than freedom of speech and your right to say pretty much whatever you want here, you are wrong to say some of the things you are saying below, particularly in the condescending manner in which you do so.

QUOTE=SuperSparkle928;21876091]---------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:"Do you honestly believe that teachers are masters in above subject matters?"

Basically, yes. If they have been teaching a topic for 20 years or so (and aren't utterly incompetent), then I would imagine that they know just a little more about the topic than someone who took a class in school, 30 years ago.

Quote:"My daughter went part time to high school for foreign language and art, and has been homeschooled for a number of years. Her teacher in French was someone who the kids had to continually correct throughout the semester. Total waste of time."

A sample size of one only demonstrates existence, not a trend.

Quote:"Most kids don't 'master' all subject matter in high school."

I never said 'master', but they should fully understand and be fluent in what they were taught. (Which may only be a small fraction of the total subject)

Quote:"Kids who are homeschooled often create their own curriculum choosing subject matter far beyond what is available to high school students and do quite well because it's what they are most interested in."

What happens if their primary interest is studying 'The mating habits of a 3-toed sloth'?

Quote:"I know homeschooled kids in college and they have a better study ethic than most of their peers."

Sample size, please.

Quote:"
Wow, aren't you arrogant. You think engineering is that special? Tell that to Matthew. He's been homeschooled since Kindergarten and is about to graduate with an engineering degree."

I am just stating facts. It has nothing to do specifically with the engineering field. You know one person that was homeschooled and is going into engineering, and I know over 1,000 who did not.
You actually should not be surprised about that in any field, as only 2.9% of children (ages 5 to 17) are homeschooled. And again, a sample size one one only shows existence, not a trend.

Quote:"Bully for your physics teacher. Something must have been wrong with him that he stooped to teach high school with a PhD."

Umm, there is a tendency for those with PhD's (many exceptions of course) to go either into research, or into teaching. Many of the teachers at my school had PhD's. It sort of goes along with the degree.

Not sure what the remainder of your thread is all about... a couple of examples of success. To be fair, now give me the numbers of those that did not do so well... If you can't, then your examples are relatively moot.[/quote]

Last edited by carolac; 11-27-2011 at 01:17 PM..
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Old 11-27-2011, 07:06 PM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,082,180 times
Reputation: 1589
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolac View Post
Your responses below are shocking. Your disdain for parents, with whom the bottom line of success or failure for their child's education rests, is also shocking.

I learn curriculum every single time along side my child when he has a question about or doesn't understand his text books or home work. We do research together to find the answer.

As the responsible party for my child's success or failure in education, the school and the teachers are my tools to insure success occurs. If my child would do better in a private school or even being home schooled rather than a public school, it is my responsibility and my expense, not yours.

I work very hard to be a good partner with my children's teachers. I follow all the rules the school, the government, the laws and even those the teachers set out for me. I take action at home to make sure my children's teachers are supported, when they are right. We both can agree there are plenty of parents AND teachers who should not be teaching. However, other than freedom of speech and your right to say pretty much whatever you want here, you are wrong to say some of the things you are saying below, particularly in the condescending manner in which you do so.
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Huh?

Perhaps you are missing the point of this thread. (You will have to tell me). It is about homeschooling, not parents.

Quote:"Your disdain for parents, with whom the bottom line of success or failure for their child's education rests, is also shocking"

Umm, I personally think that the people that have the most important impact on a child's learning experiences ARE their parents!
Not sure where you got that idea of disdain came from. I spent many an hour after school/evenings with both my parents. They taught me much of what I know. Without them, I am not so sure how I would have turned out.

Quote:"As the responsible party for my child's success or failure in education, the school and the teachers are my tools to insure success occurs."

I absolutely agree... we are in violent agreement.
(What does this have to do with homeschooling?)

Quote:"If my child would do better in a private school or even being home schooled rather than a public school, it is my responsibility and my expense, not yours."

Where did anything about my responsibility or expense, for anything, come into play in this discussion? I said nothing about it.
(What does this have to do with homeschooling?)

Quote:"I work very hard to be a good partner with my children's teachers. I follow all the rules the school, the government, the laws and even those the teachers set out for me. I take action at home to make sure my children's teachers are supported, when they are right."

I applaud you, very much so. But this is not the topic of this thread.

Quote:"you are wrong to say some of the things you are saying below, particularly in the condescending manner in which you do so."

I am just stating facts. I try to stay away from opinions (but I do make observations if there is sufficient information and evidence to support them).

I have no emotion involved in the homeschooling topic (whatsoever). Though apparently many other posters here do.
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Old 11-29-2011, 10:57 AM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 4,608,509 times
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It seems that survey is excluding the largest cost of all, the opportunity cost of the parent(s) facilitating homeschooling.

Based on the demographic information provided:
"This 'average' family has a single annual income ranging from $35,000-$100,000+, the average being $55,770."
That opportunity cost is approximately $55,000 per year and almost universal for home schooling families (i.e. few families have both parents working and are home schooling).

That is a huge cost. Even if you are educating as many as 3 children, odds are you could enroll all of your children in an elite private school for that same expense.
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Old 11-29-2011, 12:30 PM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,082,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
It seems that survey is excluding the largest cost of all, the opportunity cost of the parent(s) facilitating homeschooling.

Based on the demographic information provided:
"This 'average' family has a single annual income ranging from $35,000-$100,000+, the average being $55,770."
That opportunity cost is approximately $55,000 per year and almost universal for home schooling families (i.e. few families have both parents working and are home schooling).

That is a huge cost. Even if you are educating as many as 3 children, odds are you could enroll all of your children in an elite private school for that same expense.
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Hmm...

Quote:"That is a huge cost. Even if you are educating as many as 3 children, odds are you could enroll all of your children in an elite private school for that same expense."

Well, here the local 'elite private school' as you say, is $45,350 per student... so I don't think that will fly...
One town over, the school tuition is $47,555
A place like Brearley is $36,800 a year

I would expect that the suggestion of an 'elite private school' is out of the realm of most households.
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Old 11-29-2011, 04:58 PM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 4,608,509 times
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Well, I guess that is based on my local experience. We have no schools in the St Louis region near that price tag. Are you sure those are not boarding school rates?

Here, the three primary schools of the wealthy elite are Chaminade, MICDS, and John Burroughs School. MICDS is $16,950 primary and $21,950 secondary with discounts for multiple children (I think 50% after the 1st). Chaminade is $15,195 and also has multiple children discounts. John Burroughs School is $22,100, and their financial aid starts at incomes below $130k. $55k could pay for 4 children at Chaminade or MICDS, at most likely three children with aid at John Burroughs.

Then we have Thomas Jefferson School, which is is perennially one of the top 10 prep schools in the country with test scores equal to Exeter and Phillips. Their tuition is $22,000 per year. You could send 2 children to a top 10 in the country school for $55k per year (before any financial aid).

Chaminade does jump to $31,880 and Thomas Jefferson to $38,000 with 7-day board; which is why i wonder if that is boarding tuition for those other schools.
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Old 11-30-2011, 06:44 AM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,082,180 times
Reputation: 1589
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
Well, I guess that is based on my local experience. We have no schools in the St Louis region near that price tag. Are you sure those are not boarding school rates?

Here, the three primary schools of the wealthy elite are Chaminade, MICDS, and John Burroughs School. MICDS is $16,950 primary and $21,950 secondary with discounts for multiple children (I think 50% after the 1st). Chaminade is $15,195 and also has multiple children discounts. John Burroughs School is $22,100, and their financial aid starts at incomes below $130k. $55k could pay for 4 children at Chaminade or MICDS, at most likely three children with aid at John Burroughs.

Then we have Thomas Jefferson School, which is is perennially one of the top 10 prep schools in the country with test scores equal to Exeter and Phillips. Their tuition is $22,000 per year. You could send 2 children to a top 10 in the country school for $55k per year (before any financial aid).

Chaminade does jump to $31,880 and Thomas Jefferson to $38,000 with 7-day board; which is why i wonder if that is boarding tuition for those other schools.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

The numbers I quoted were the boarding school rates.

According to: Boarding Schools with the Highest Average SAT Score- Boarding School Review
and: http://www.boardingschoolreview.com/school_ranking.php
for highest SAT scores, TJ is number 11, so it is a very good school.

(I know that SAT scores are only part of the entire equation for getting a good education, and getting into a good college, but it is definitely a major factor).

What I did find interesting was that 9 of the top 17 schools are all less than 50 miles from where I live, so to me, boarding is not necessary.

What I don't understand is where the OP got the $55K amount... If that is the salary of one of the parents, that is pre-tax, so they will have to make a lot more than that to cover the cost of schooling.
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