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Old 11-30-2011, 06:43 AM
 
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If both parents are working full time then one would also have to take into account childcare costs for school breaks, summer and after school care. If I went back to the job I had pre-kids and I sent both of my children to the cheapest private school in our city, I'd be lucky to break even after all was said and done.
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Old 11-30-2011, 07:56 AM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
What I don't understand is where the OP got the $55K amount... If that is the salary of one of the parents, that is pre-tax, so they will have to make a lot more than that to cover the cost of schooling.
I was the one who posted $55k. The article says that on average home schooling families have a single income earning $55k. Assuming the other parent can also make $55k might be a big assumption, but there is not much else to go on to figure the opportunity cost of the parent staying home. The tax question is probably the biggest issue, along with after school child care (though most two income households I know are now using flex time and staggered shifts to avoid child care costs once the children hit school).

What is very common in this area is for one parent to take a job at one of the major private schools. This provides additional income as well as a huge tuition break (tax free too!), and since their schedule matches the school's schedule, no after school child care expenses. Of course, the St Louis region is loaded with private schools; many areas have more children in private schools than public schools.
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Old 11-30-2011, 01:57 PM
 
15,302 posts, read 16,854,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
I was the one who posted $55k. The article says that on average home schooling families have a single income earning $55k. Assuming the other parent can also make $55k might be a big assumption, but there is not much else to go on to figure the opportunity cost of the parent staying home. The tax question is probably the biggest issue, along with after school child care (though most two income households I know are now using flex time and staggered shifts to avoid child care costs once the children hit school).

What is very common in this area is for one parent to take a job at one of the major private schools. This provides additional income as well as a huge tuition break (tax free too!), and since their schedule matches the school's schedule, no after school child care expenses. Of course, the St Louis region is loaded with private schools; many areas have more children in private schools than public schools.
It is very rare that the sah parent could earn the same amount as the woh parent, first of all.

Secondly, while the sah parent *could* work, there may or may not be any jobs available for that parent.

Thirdly, while the sah parent has to have clothing, the clothing for work costs considerably more than clothing that you can sah in. So you must account for the cost of daycare, the incremental tax for the woh parent, the tax of the sah parent who goes to work, the possible cost for services that might need to be performed by paid workers if the sah parent goes to work, etc., etc. For many families, the monetary loss is much less than you think.

You also have to account for the fact that the parent believes that staying home is better for the family. Remember that the sah parent does a lot more than homeschool the children.
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Old 11-30-2011, 03:05 PM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,067,315 times
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Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
It is very rare that the sah parent could earn the same amount as the woh parent, first of all.

Secondly, while the sah parent *could* work, there may or may not be any jobs available for that parent.

Thirdly, while the sah parent has to have clothing, the clothing for work costs considerably more than clothing that you can sah in. So you must account for the cost of daycare, the incremental tax for the woh parent, the tax of the sah parent who goes to work, the possible cost for services that might need to be performed by paid workers if the sah parent goes to work, etc., etc. For many families, the monetary loss is much less than you think.

You also have to account for the fact that the parent believes that staying home is better for the family. Remember that the sah parent does a lot more than homeschool the children.
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:"Remember that the sah parent does a lot more than homeschool the children."

Such as? (meaning if both parents woh, the same things need to get done
at home anyway). Correct?
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Old 11-30-2011, 03:30 PM
 
15,302 posts, read 16,854,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:"Remember that the sah parent does a lot more than homeschool the children."

Such as? (meaning if both parents woh, the same things need to get done
at home anyway). Correct?
When we both worked, we paid for someone to clean once a week. We went out more for meals too.
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Old 11-30-2011, 03:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
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Such as? (meaning if both parents woh, the same things need to get done
at home anyway). Correct?
really?? Having been both, I can assure you that the same things don't get done at home. Maybe others handle it much better than I, but in my experience, with two working parents, your often on survival mode, kids don't get the choice of activities, your rushing from here to there, dinners often an afterthought, bedtimes get later, there's not as much down time, weekends are catch up. You are paying out a lot to get things done that either one of you could have done given more time.
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Old 11-30-2011, 04:25 PM
 
1,226 posts, read 1,981,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
---------------------------------------------------------------------

I am just stating facts. It has nothing to do specifically with the engineering field. You know one person that was homeschooled and is going into engineering, and I know over 1,000 who did not.
You actually should not be surprised about that in any field, as only 2.9% of children (ages 5 to 17) are homeschooled. And again, a sample size one one only shows existence, not a trend.
I find it very intresting that you keep saying you know 1,000 engineers that worked under you and NONE of them homeschooled. First off, how very odd that you asked 1,000 of your employees if they were homeschooled, did they not find that odd? In my everyday life, both professional or personal, I have NEVER asked about someone's elementary or highschool experience..... well, maybe my first month at college, but that would have been it. I would be very surprised if my boss asked me about highschool now.

I'm not a homeschooler, by the way, although sometimes I wish I were.
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Old 11-30-2011, 04:33 PM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,067,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cc0789 View Post
really?? Having been both, I can assure you that the same things don't get done at home. Maybe others handle it much better than I, but in my experience, with two working parents, your often on survival mode, kids don't get the choice of activities, your rushing from here to there, dinners often an afterthought, bedtimes get later, there's not as much down time, weekends are catch up. You are paying out a lot to get things done that either one of you could have done given more time.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Perhaps, but if you stay home and do housecleaning, then your time is worth what a housekeeper would get paid for those hours. If you mow the lawn, those hours are worth what the kid down the street gets paid to mow your lawn. If you don't want a babysitter on a night you want to go out, then your time is worth what you pay the babysitter.

I think it is a matter of being organized. Having grown up in a family where both parents worked, I saw none of the downsides you have listed above.

You have stated one example of where you thought it was hard, and I have stated one example where it was executed fluently. So we have both demonstrated examples of existence of each type of lifestyle.
So now we only have to identify the variable that is different between the two examples.
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Old 12-01-2011, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,722,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cc0789 View Post
really?? Having been both, I can assure you that the same things don't get done at home. Maybe others handle it much better than I, but in my experience, with two working parents, your often on survival mode, kids don't get the choice of activities, your rushing from here to there, dinners often an afterthought, bedtimes get later, there's not as much down time, weekends are catch up. You are paying out a lot to get things done that either one of you could have done given more time.
It doesn't have to be that way. Seriously, there are only about 21 hours of housework that need to be done each week (read this in a study comparing working and non working parents). When mom works, dad picks up some of the slack (according to that article, about 1/3 of what mom would do if she were home). When my kids were little, they were in gymnastics, dance, piano, took swimming lessons, etc, etc, etc...because they have TWO parents to run those errands not just one. Sometimes dh was the coach, sometimes I was. It depended on the activity and the child's disposition.

I don't have time to do it now, but I'll try and post an article talking about this later. Our kids do not lose when we work. WE DO. It's not time for our children that is cut. We cut time for ourselves. We sleep less than SAHM's, we spend less time with friends, we spend less time on hobbies and we spend less time on housework (because it's shared with our dh's). Yes, SHAM's have more free time that WM's but once you have enough, more is just more.


Bedtimes I'll agree with you on. The SAHM's I know have had all they can take of their children by 8:00 whether the kids are ready for bed or not. Bedtime for us was more like 9:00 as I was still enjoying my kids the end of the day and they weren't tired. Besides, it doesn't matter what time they go to bed as long as they are allowed to get enough sleep.
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Old 12-01-2011, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,722,259 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by cc0789 View Post
really?? Having been both, I can assure you that the same things don't get done at home. Maybe others handle it much better than I, but in my experience, with two working parents, your often on survival mode, kids don't get the choice of activities, your rushing from here to there, dinners often an afterthought, bedtimes get later, there's not as much down time, weekends are catch up. You are paying out a lot to get things done that either one of you could have done given more time.
Just wanted to add that whether or not you go into survival mode depends on your work schedules. I found 45 hours a week, working as an engineer, to be easy. There is NO WAY I could teach and have small children at home. I get NOTHING done at home during the school year (my dh claims he does not see me from September to June). Fortunately, my kids were older when I made this career change so we can deal with it but I cannot imagine this schedule and small children at home. As things are now, I hardly see my 13 year old. Fortunately, she's my easy child. The one year it was her sister I didn't see was hell.

Most jobs mix quite well with parenthood but some don't. Some demand too much of us and too much of our time but that doesn't mean that's even the way it is for most people. Most of us work a traditional work week and there is plenty of time left for all kinds of things. While it's true I spent 45 fewer hours at home when my kids were little, I didn't lose 45 hours with them and dh picked up some of what I would have done. I think it's kind of sweet that my girls grew up with daddy cooking them breakfast every morning because I had already left for work.
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