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Old 12-04-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,747,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorthy View Post
No thanks. I'm pretty happy with and committed to homeschooling.
A good book to read is "The Nurture Assumption". Peers are very important to our kids. What I accomplished by moving dd to the district I teach in is give her higher quality peers. It's amazing the difference two years has made. Two years ago we were going through hell with her. Now I don't even have to look at her grades or ask her if her work is done. She emulates her peers.

If I knew then what I know now (both as a parent and a teacher) I would have moved to a better area years ago. We're very lucky with dd#2. She's just one of those kids who blooms where you plant them. She chose a great peer group herself. Some kids need you to find one for them.

Homeschooling would be a disaster for dd#1. She needs solid peers and she needs to be in an environment where parents aren't calling all the shots so she can learn from her mistakes. I can't imagine anything worse for her than homeschooling.
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Old 12-04-2011, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,747,102 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
----------------------------------------------------------------------

(getting off topic)

I think it is a really hot issue in many places... It actually got me to start a relocation to an area that has no school system (unincorporated areas). I never have, nor ever will use the school system.

If you think it is so great, then we should ALL chip in the same to pay for the schools... (and maybe even tie the amount to the number of students you have in the public school system).

So I will start.. I dump $1500/month in property tax just to support the school system... Ringo1 and Dorthy... ready to match?
You pay $18,000 per year in property taxes just for schools??? What are your total taxes???? Either you live in a mansion or a very wealthy community. I find it hard to believe that a system that is funded that well and has that high an SES is so awful (you'd have to be in a 1.5 million dollar home to pay that much towards schools where I live) That's A LOT of money for schools. You'd have to be in a million dollar house in the district I teach in to pay that much just toward the schools and that's assuming 18 mils for the schools (we pay 12 where I live). My district isn't great but it isn't bad either and it has nowhere near the kind of funding yours has. The one I teach in may be close because there are many multimillion dollar homes in the district and taxes are very high there. I can't say for sure.

All I can say is it must be nice. It always amazes me when the wealthy complain about what they pay. It's your choice to live where you do and in the kind of house you do. Maybe you should look at what you have instead of what you pay in taxes. You're lucky to be where you are. Most people would love to be able to live somewhere where the taxes are $18K/year just for the schools. I can't afford to live somewhere where the total taxes are one third that. (I pay about $1500/year into the schools so I'll assume my house is 1/12th yours). I'm just curious. What's the value of your house? $1500/month would cover my mortgage, my taxes and my utility bills if I were on a traditional 30 year mortgage and you're paying that much just in school taxes??? All I can say is congratulations on being able to afford that. While I'm sure you think you should keep more of what you have, count your blessings. You're way above the rest of us.

Seriously, if you can afford $18000/year JUST in school taxes, why not move somewhere where the schools are good? There has to be an area you can live in with less taxes and better schools. Don't complain when this is, clearly, your choice.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 12-04-2011 at 03:21 PM..
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Old 12-04-2011, 02:50 PM
 
Location: WI
2,820 posts, read 3,068,807 times
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Why are you under the assumption that homeschooled kids do not have peers?
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Old 12-04-2011, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,747,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strawflower View Post
Why are you under the assumption that homeschooled kids do not have peers?
They don't have peers in the sense that kids who go to school do. School is a unique environment and kids spend about 1/4th of their waking time there.
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Old 12-04-2011, 03:06 PM
 
Location: WI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
They don't have peers in the sense that kids who go to school do. School is a unique environment and kids spend about 1/4th of their waking time there.
Most of the kids I know who are homeschooled have many peers- from school conferences, sports, clubs, etc. They know kids from ALL different walks of life and activities.
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Old 12-04-2011, 03:15 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 5,148,149 times
Reputation: 3579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
A good book to read is "The Nurture Assumption". Peers are very important to our kids. What I accomplished by moving dd to the district I teach in is give her higher quality peers. It's amazing the difference two years has made. Two years ago we were going through hell with her. Now I don't even have to look at her grades or ask her if her work is done. She emulates her peers.

If I knew then what I know now (both as a parent and a teacher) I would have moved to a better area years ago. We're very lucky with dd#2. She's just one of those kids who blooms where you plant them. She chose a great peer group herself. Some kids need you to find one for them.

Homeschooling would be a disaster for dd#1. She needs solid peers and she needs to be in an environment where parents aren't calling all the shots so she can learn from her mistakes. I can't imagine anything worse for her than homeschooling.
Homeschooling has provided my dd with a high quality group of peers. I don't need school for that. She has plenty of time to socialize amongst her peers. Last week she spent about 10 hours just playing with friends. In addition she spent roughly 5 hours with her peers and adults in a structured environment, away from Mom and Dad.

You can't imagine anything worse for your dd then homeschooling? Really???
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Old 12-04-2011, 03:20 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 5,148,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
They don't have peers in the sense that kids who go to school do. School is a unique environment and kids spend about 1/4th of their waking time there.
I remember the unique social environment of school. I did go there for 13 years, after all. Bullying, early exposure to drugs, sex and materialism, peer pressure, etc. It sure was an awesome time.
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Old 12-04-2011, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,747,102 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by strawflower View Post
Most of the kids I know who are homeschooled have many peers- from school conferences, sports, clubs, etc. They know kids from ALL different walks of life and activities.
Yes, but they don't spend time with them in non parental supervised venues like kids who go to school. I think there's something to be said for having such a venue. School is my children's domain. They have to figure out how to make things work. That's different than organized sports, which are good because they teach teamwork but they're organized. My dd's have formed strong bonds with their peers because they spend so much time with them. It's been interesting watching them develop within their peer groups. I wouldn't take that away from them for the world.
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Old 12-04-2011, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,747,102 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorthy View Post
I remember the unique social environment of school. I did go there for 13 years, after all. Bullying, early exposure to drugs, sex and materialism, peer pressure, etc. It sure was an awesome time.
Your choice to run with that or not. I chose not. So does dd#2. Dd#1, needed us to hand her a better peer group which we did through my taking the job I have. I've ready books like the Nurture Assumption but it's still kind of a shock seeing that peer group in action. It makes a huge difference. Parents do need to decide if their kids need a peer group change. My brothers and sisters and I never ran with the drug crowds even though we went to school with them. We chose a higher quality peer. My parents would have moved if we hadn't. They wouldn't have allowed us to get into groups like that.

While I can say I was bullied in school I can also say it taught me to stand up for myself and it taught me who my friends were.
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Old 12-04-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: WI
2,820 posts, read 3,068,807 times
Reputation: 4815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
Yes, but they don't spend time with them in non parental supervised venues like kids who go to school. I think there's something to be said for having such a venue. School is my children's domain. They have to figure out how to make things work. That's different than organized sports, which are good because they teach teamwork but they're organized. My dd's have formed strong bonds with their peers because they spend so much time with them. It's been interesting watching them develop within their peer groups. I wouldn't take that away from them for the world.
Again- just because a kid is homeschooled doesn't mean they're isolated from other kids. My son went to a leadership camp this summer and there were plenty of homeschooled kids there, which he is still friends many of them. My daughter plays club volleyball and there was a girl on the team last year who was homeschooled- she was incredibly nice and well-adjusted. In fact, the one girl who was very socially awkward came from a public school, as did the girl who cried every time she missed a serve or hit.
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