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Old 11-22-2011, 09:28 PM
 
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Someone said in another thread the homeschooling is expensive. Actually, it does not have to be expensive at all. I found this website which compared how much people spent when homeschooling and it is very instructive

What It Costs To Homeschool - Homefires.com

Quote:
The Final Tally:

Our "average, survey-responding family" spent:
To Establish Homeschool: $ 432.00
For Curriculum, Books,Textbooks, Workbooks: $ 398.00
Software: $ 134.00
Audio/Video: $ 160.00
Classes: $ 1,560.00
Museum Memberships: $ 140.00
Paper, Supplies, Etc.: $ 150.00
Field Trips: $ 223.00
Grand Total: $ 3,197.00/year

How do your expenses measure up to our "average" family? Homefires would like to hear your opinions and reactions to this information. Write to us. We'll publish your thoughts in the next issue. Homefires, 180 El Camino Real, #10, Millbrae, CA 94030.
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,845,359 times
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Forgot a couple expenses:

Stress related psychological counseling $1500
Anti anxiety medication, $500

Seriously, how does anyone home school without going nuts? When do parents who home school get a break?

What about the costs of having to be at home and not draw a paycheck (an opportunity cost)?

And all these expenses are after a person has paid taxes that provide an $8000/year per kid education in the government schools - an education that his kids are not taking advantage of.
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Old 11-23-2011, 06:43 AM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,070,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
Forgot a couple expenses:

Stress related psychological counseling $1500
Anti anxiety medication, $500

Seriously, how does anyone home school without going nuts? When do parents who home school get a break?

What about the costs of having to be at home and not draw a paycheck (an opportunity cost)?

And all these expenses are after a person has paid taxes that provide an $8000/year per kid education in the government schools - an education that his kids are not taking advantage of.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Absolutely agree with every point.

Although not financial, I hope they have the skill set to be a master of ALL the various subject matters; sciences, languages, history, music etc.
If they have that skill set, then the opportunity cost of not drawing a paycheck dwarfs all the other expenses combined.

I also wondered about the socialization skills learned, and being able to deal with the reality of the real world. Unfortunately, in the real world, there are bullies, and people who tease others, and social cliques. To prepare a student to live life, they have to be exposed to that.
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Old 11-23-2011, 07:24 AM
 
4,267 posts, read 5,148,149 times
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Homeschooling costs can add up quickly. I would consider $3,197 per year to be on the expensive side. We are only in our first official year but our main expenses are memberships (museums, zoo, etc.), rec classes and supplies. Some of our expenses would exist regardless if our child was homeschooled or in school. If my child was in school I would still be a SAHM so I do not consider the loss of potential income to be a factor.

In order to save money we use the library, a lot. We purchased a membership to one museum and upgraded so that we can get friends in for free. Our homeschooling friends did the same but at different places so we get them into free on our membership and they get us in for free on theirs. It works out well.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Absolutely agree with every point.

Although not financial, I hope they have the skill set to be a master of ALL the various subject matters; sciences, languages, history, music etc.
If they have that skill set, then the opportunity cost of not drawing a paycheck dwarfs all the other expenses combined.

I also wondered about the socialization skills learned, and being able to deal with the reality of the real world. Unfortunately, in the real world, there are bullies, and people who tease others, and social cliques. To prepare a student to live life, they have to be exposed to that.
There's really no need to be a master of all subject matter. A homeschool parent can choose to learn new material along with their child, use boxed or online curriculum, sign them up for classes, hire a tutor, find a mentor, etc. I consider a homeschool parent to be more of a facilitator of learning rather then a repository of information.

As for socialization, homeschoolers live and breathe in the same real world as everyone else. You might see them at the mall, the grocery store, the library, the park, the zoo, the museum, in your child's gymnastics class, etc. I'd say that homeschooled children have more time out in the "real world" since they don't spend 6 hours a day, 5 days a week in a classroom made up entirely of their peers with one or two adults in charge.
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Old 11-23-2011, 08:29 AM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,070,972 times
Reputation: 1589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorthy View Post
Homeschooling costs can add up quickly. I would consider $3,197 per year to be on the expensive side. We are only in our first official year but our main expenses are memberships (museums, zoo, etc.), rec classes and supplies. Some of our expenses would exist regardless if our child was homeschooled or in school. If my child was in school I would still be a SAHM so I do not consider the loss of potential income to be a factor.

In order to save money we use the library, a lot. We purchased a membership to one museum and upgraded so that we can get friends in for free. Our homeschooling friends did the same but at different places so we get them into free on our membership and they get us in for free on theirs. It works out well.




There's really no need to be a master of all subject matter. A homeschool parent can choose to learn new material along with their child, use boxed or online curriculum, sign them up for classes, hire a tutor, find a mentor, etc. I consider a homeschool parent to be more of a facilitator of learning rather then a repository of information.

As for socialization, homeschoolers live and breathe in the same real world as everyone else. You might see them at the mall, the grocery store, the library, the park, the zoo, the museum, in your child's gymnastics class, etc. I'd say that homeschooled children have more time out in the "real world" since they don't spend 6 hours a day, 5 days a week in a classroom made up entirely of their peers with one or two adults in charge.
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:"We are only in our first official year but our main expenses are memberships (museums, zoo, etc.)"

Many towns let you check out a pass to the museums, zoos, art galleries etc) from the library for free. Mine does. I think each one admits 4 people.

Quote:"Some of our expenses would exist regardless if our child was homeschooled or in school."

I only have a sample size of one, but the expenses when attending a public school (in this case semi-private), are essentially nil.

Quote:"...homeschoolers live and breathe in the same real world as everyone else. You might see them at the mall, the grocery store, the library, the park, the zoo, the museum,..."

That is not what I meant by socialization. All those things can be done regardless of how you are schooled. I meant things like conflict resolution, social groups etc.
JMHO, the wildest students I ever met in college (the freshmen) (and I went for many a year, collecting degrees), were the home-schooled students, as this was the first time they were away from home, without any apron-strings, and were free to do whatever they wanted in college. It was sad to see them crash and burn.
AS an aside, in my professional career (high-tech) I have worked with, or have had work for me, well over 1,000 engineers. I have gotten to know each one of them personally, over years. I have yet to meet one that was home-schooled. Perhaps they go into different occupations.

Quote:"There's really no need to be a master of all subject matter. A homeschool parent can choose to learn new material along with their child, use boxed or online curriculum, sign them up for classes, hire a tutor, find a mentor, etc. I consider a homeschool parent to be more of a facilitator of learning rather then a repository of information. "

"learn new material along with their child"? I see, so if you don't know how to do it, you figure it out on the fly. My physics teacher in high school had a PhD in physics. He didn't even have to open a book to clearly explain concepts, and could answer any question.

Quote:"use boxed or online curriculum, sign them up for classes, hire a tutor, find a mentor, etc. I consider a homeschool parent to be more of a facilitator of learning rather then a repository of information."

Well, that is going to drive up the cost of home schooling significantly. What you are paying in taxes for the public system now doesn't sound so bad (oh wait, you are paying that anyway). I love to tutor, and I do it for free, but those I know charge $30/hr.
So, what I gather from your statements, you being a 'facilitator' (we have other names for that in industry), you don't actually do the teaching, you line up other resources (boxed/online curriculum, classes, tutors, mentors etc) to actually do the work. Sounds like the traditional 'Program Manager' in industry... you line up all the ducks, but you don't have to know how anything works.
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Old 11-23-2011, 08:54 AM
 
4,267 posts, read 5,148,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:"We are only in our first official year but our main expenses are memberships (museums, zoo, etc.)"

Many towns let you check out a pass to the museums, zoos, art galleries etc) from the library for free. Mine does. I think each one admits 4 people.
That's cool. I wish we had that option.

Quote:
Quote:"Some of our expenses would exist regardless if our child was homeschooled or in school."

I only have a sample size of one, but the expenses when attending a public school (in this case semi-private), are essentially nil.
I was talking about things like art supplies, books, games and costs associated with rec classes such as soccer, gymnastics. I bet most parents spend money on those types of things.

Quote:
Quote:"...homeschoolers live and breathe in the same real world as everyone else. You might see them at the mall, the grocery store, the library, the park, the zoo, the museum,..."

That is not what I meant by socialization. All those things can be done regardless of how you are schooled. I meant things like conflict resolution, social groups etc.
These types of life lessons are not exclusive to schools. Homeschoolers have plenty of opportunities for socialization.

Quote:
JMHO, the wildest students I ever met in college (the freshmen) (and I went for many a year, collecting degrees), were the home-schooled students, as this was the first time they were away from home, without any apron-strings, and were free to do whatever they wanted in college. It was sad to see them crash and burn.
I don't share your experience.

Quote:
AS an aside, in my professional career (high-tech) I have worked with, or have had work for me, well over 1,000 engineers. I have gotten to know each one of them personally, over years. I have yet to meet one that was home-schooled. Perhaps they go into different occupations.
I assure you, there are engineers that were homeschooled.

Quote:
Quote:"There's really no need to be a master of all subject matter. A homeschool parent can choose to learn new material along with their child, use boxed or online curriculum, sign them up for classes, hire a tutor, find a mentor, etc. I consider a homeschool parent to be more of a facilitator of learning rather then a repository of information. "

"learn new material along with their child"? I see, so if you don't know how to do it, you figure it out on the fly. My physics teacher in high school had a PhD in physics. He didn't even have to open a book to clearly explain concepts, and could answer any question.
Yes, learning along with my child for some things would work well, for others a tutor or a class would be best.

Quote:
Quote:"use boxed or online curriculum, sign them up for classes, hire a tutor, find a mentor, etc. I consider a homeschool parent to be more of a facilitator of learning rather then a repository of information."

Well, that is going to drive up the cost of home schooling significantly. What you are paying in taxes for the public system now doesn't sound so bad (oh wait, you are paying that anyway). I love to tutor, and I do it for free, but those I know charge $30/hr.
Yeah, that is why I said that homeschooling can be expensive. In my state, homeschoolers are allowed to attend college classes at the age of 14 at the school district's expense so some of those classes would be free.

Quote:
So, what I gather from your statements, you being a 'facilitator' (we have other names for that in industry), you don't actually do the teaching, you line up other resources (boxed/online curriculum, classes, tutors, mentors etc) to actually do the work. Sounds like the traditional 'Program Manager' in industry... you line up all the ducks, but you don't have to know how anything works.
You're twisting my words and obviously not interested in trying to understand what I'm saying. Not sure why I wasted my time responding?
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Old 11-23-2011, 01:30 PM
 
15,308 posts, read 16,874,788 times
Reputation: 15029
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Absolutely agree with every point.

Although not financial, I hope they have the skill set to be a master of ALL the various subject matters; sciences, languages, history, music etc.
If they have that skill set, then the opportunity cost of not drawing a paycheck dwarfs all the other expenses combined.

I also wondered about the socialization skills learned, and being able to deal with the reality of the real world. Unfortunately, in the real world, there are bullies, and people who tease others, and social cliques. To prepare a student to live life, they have to be exposed to that.
Parents certainly can have the expertise in the early years. As the kids get older, there is nothing in homeschooling that says you can't take a class on subjects your parents are not familiar with.

Many home schooled children actually have better socialization than their school peers because they have to learn to get along with all ages (age stratification is a real detriment in our current society - it was not so much when I was growing up, but now kids are almost never with kids of a different ages). Also most home schoolers attend co-ops for some classes and the kids go to art, dance, music and gym classes that school kids may go to outside of school. Sometimes they get to go during the day when regular school children have to be in school instead of waiting until after school. Sometimes they go to these classes during the same hours that other school children do. I do NOT think that kids need to be exposed to bullies in order to learn the skills to deal with them, btw. What they need is the confidence in themselves to know that the bullies are the ones who are weird, not them.
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Old 11-23-2011, 01:32 PM
 
15,308 posts, read 16,874,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
--------------------------------------------------------------------


Quote:"Some of our expenses would exist regardless if our child was homeschooled or in school."

I only have a sample size of one, but the expenses when attending a public school (in this case semi-private), are essentially nil.
So you never buy supplies for projects? You never have field trips that have fees? You never have to buy pencils, pens, markers, etc. for school work? Or paper?

These are the expenses I suspect she is talking about.
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Old 11-23-2011, 01:37 PM
 
15,308 posts, read 16,874,788 times
Reputation: 15029
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
--------------------------------------------------------------------


Quote:"...homeschoolers live and breathe in the same real world as everyone else. You might see them at the mall, the grocery store, the library, the park, the zoo, the museum,..."

That is not what I meant by socialization. All those things can be done regardless of how you are schooled. I meant things like conflict resolution, social groups etc.
JMHO, the wildest students I ever met in college (the freshmen) (and I went for many a year, collecting degrees), were the home-schooled students, as this was the first time they were away from home, without any apron-strings, and were free to do whatever they wanted in college. It was sad to see them crash and burn.
AS an aside, in my professional career (high-tech) I have worked with, or have had work for me, well over 1,000 engineers. I have gotten to know each one of them personally, over years. I have yet to meet one that was home-schooled. Perhaps they go into different occupations.
Why do you think that home schooled kids don't get to work with other children on projects. As for conflict resolution, kids in school do very little of that nowadays. The adults watch out for them. When I was growing up, we learned through playing with kids of all ages. Now, kids only socialize with kids almost exactly their own age. They do not learn conflict resolution - see the facebook bullying, etc.

The kids that my dd saw that were problems in college were actually often Catholic school students who had never been allowed to do anything without mom and dad attached or without supervision from the teachers.

Kids who are home-schooled vary as much as the kids who are in school on these skills.
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Old 11-23-2011, 04:33 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,368,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
As for conflict resolution, kids in school do very little of that nowadays. The adults watch out for them. When I was growing up, we learned through playing with kids of all ages. Now, kids only socialize with kids almost exactly their own age. They do not learn conflict resolution - see the facebook bullying, etc.

The kids that my dd saw that were problems in college were actually often Catholic school students who had never been allowed to do anything without mom and dad attached or without supervision from the teachers.
I agree with the first paragraph.

Can't say the second paragraph has been my experience. At all.
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