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Old 12-04-2011, 07:12 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 53,845,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MovedfromFL View Post
Teacher salaries do vary widely by state. In FL, you can teach for 10 years and only make $38,600. In NJ, you would be over $55k for that same level. (and a lot more if you have advanced degrees)

A big factor is also teacher benefits. In many states, teachers still get a pretty good (ok, great!) benefit package (health insurance, dental, etc). In FL, teachers get much less (my SIL teaches in NJ and she was paying basically nothing for family medical coverage, while we would pay over $800 a month for that, and we get a much worse "plan" that covers very little.) She had a baby on her plan and paid zero. I had a baby on my plan and paid over $3,000 out of pocket back when I was a teacher.

I'm astounded at how high the per student costs are in other states. FL is rock bottom (and sinking). Georgia does manage to pay teachers a lot more compared to FL, and offers much better insurance (all GA teachers are on the state program).

The education portion of our property taxes actually declined this year in FL. Lawmakers are pandering for votes. Meanwhile, teachers got zero raises, and health insurance premiums increased by$50 a month. Many of my former co-workers are either no longer in FL or no longer teachers. Many went to GA and some even to NJ!
One thing to keep in mind is yes, teachers have access to good medical plans but it is VERY rare that they do not pay for at least half of their premiums. Often these premiums are low because the average age of teachers is low and that translates into lower medical costs overall. If you worked for a company with a young work force, you would see the same thing. One nice thing most teacher unions do is secure better medical plans for teachers. Your company COULD do the same thing if they wanted. Your company could pay more of your premiums if they wanted. This isn't a teacher issue, it is a "your company" issue.

Pensions are almost ALWAYS funded by teachers-at least the majority of what gets put into their pension--and in most states that "contribution" is required, i.e. not an option. In our state 8% of the teacher's salaries goes into their pension funds. In the business world you have a choice to put money into your 401K.

As for per pupil spending, throwing more money at the problem isn't always the answer. The average per pupil spending in Florida is about $1000 more then our district spends per student yet our district consistently ranks as one of the best in the nation, has some of the highest average ACT/SAT scores in the nation. Part of the issue is the number of low income/non-English speaking families you have in your state--and Florida has a high percentage of both. You do need "enough" money to do the job right though so cutting funds is never the answer.
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Old 12-04-2011, 09:32 AM
 
16,565 posts, read 14,001,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MovedfromFL View Post
Teacher salaries do vary widely by state. In FL, you can teach for 10 years and only make $38,600. In NJ, you would be over $55k for that same level. (and a lot more if you have advanced degrees)
A lot more? A PhD in my district nets 3k more. Maybe that is "a lot" to you but considering how much money it costs to get that degree it is not "a lot" more.

Additionally you are ignoring the cost of living. It is FAR more expensive to live in NJ that almost any place in Fl. Additionally, it is easier to be a teacher (at least in terms of science certification) in Fl than NJ.

Quote:
A big factor is also teacher benefits. In many states, teachers still get a pretty good (ok, great!) benefit package (health insurance, dental, etc). In FL, teachers get much less (my SIL teaches in NJ and she was paying basically nothing for family medical coverage, while we would pay over $800 a month for that, and we get a much worse "plan" that covers very little.) She had a baby on her plan and paid zero. I had a baby on my plan and paid over $3,000 out of pocket back when I was a teacher.

I'm astounded at how high the per student costs are in other states. FL is rock bottom (and sinking). Georgia does manage to pay teachers a lot more compared to FL, and offers much better insurance (all GA teachers are on the state program).

The education portion of our property taxes actually declined this year in FL. Lawmakers are pandering for votes. Meanwhile, teachers got zero raises, and health insurance premiums increased by$50 a month. Many of my former co-workers are either no longer in FL or no longer teachers. Many went to GA and some even to NJ!
Then move to NJ, work on your certifications and try to get a job here. You really should think about why a race to the bottom is bad for EVERYONE including the students. Compare scores of almost any parameter for NJ to Fl and you will see why.
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