U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 12-03-2011, 05:35 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,173 posts, read 39,297,084 times
Reputation: 40671

Advertisements

Is this class going to be mostly a 9th grade offering? If so the adjustment may not be too bad. If your daughter is the only 9th grader, or one of only a few, it might take more thought to have her in the class. Ivory made me think of that.

My system has the 9th graders in our Science and Tech magnets take AP Bio. AP US History is also a 9th grade course (although I've argued against that at a policy level. I lost that argument.).

 
Old 12-03-2011, 06:08 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,454,643 times
Reputation: 10476
Most of the college bound freshmen at our high school take AP classes freshman year. For good students, they need the challenge. Also, colleges want to see you taking the most rigorous schedule possible at your school. One AP class freshman year is not going to be a big issue for a good student. We have 2 juniors in high school--one taking 4 AP classes one taking 5 this year. It's a lot of work but they prefer this. The one taking 4 AP classes is not taking an AP history class this year (they can chose from AP World or AP Euro) and is now regretting that decision because her honors AP Euro class is too easy.
 
Old 12-03-2011, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
4,703 posts, read 5,853,248 times
Reputation: 5385
It sounds like your daughters' school is a large academically oriented school. All schools don't treat AP classes the same. In some schools students must commit to taking the AP exam for that class. The AP classes in some of the large suburban affluent high schools are more difficult than the equivalent college classes at many colleges. In other schools the AP classes are called AP but are really academic classes. The majority of the students don't plan to take the AP exam. My philosophy is that students should be challenged but not overwhelmed. The students must be willing to work harder in an AP class than they would in a normal class. In many of the regular academic classes, students are not being challenged at all. From what you have said, I would lean toward letting her take the AP Human Geography. In all liklihood, she could switch back to the Civics and Geography class. The other question is whether she would be better off with the regular Civics and Geography? Will she pick up the civics that she missed in AP Government. Human Geography is rather specialized and I consider it less important than having a good grasp of civics and basic world geography.
 
Old 12-03-2011, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,754,018 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Most of the college bound freshmen at our high school take AP classes freshman year. For good students, they need the challenge. Also, colleges want to see you taking the most rigorous schedule possible at your school. One AP class freshman year is not going to be a big issue for a good student. We have 2 juniors in high school--one taking 4 AP classes one taking 5 this year. It's a lot of work but they prefer this. The one taking 4 AP classes is not taking an AP history class this year (they can chose from AP World or AP Euro) and is now regretting that decision because her honors AP Euro class is too easy.
This is a testimony to how badly we've dummied down education. 50 years ago, most college bound freshmen wouldn't have been capable of taking a class for college credit and they shouldn't have been. College was college back then. Now it's just an extension of high school. That 9th graders are, routinely, taking classes for college credit is really egg on our faces. It shows the world just how easy college has become here.

Seriously, what percentage of college bound students should be capable of taking a college level class (that's what AP is supposed to be) a full 4 years before they're old enough to go to college? Have college level classes really been dummied down to the point that most college bound freshmen are capable of taking them at the age of 13 or 14? No wonder this country is failing.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 12-03-2011 at 08:45 AM..
 
Old 12-03-2011, 08:58 AM
 
Location: GOVERNMENT of TRAITORS & NAZIS
20,598 posts, read 22,770,552 times
Reputation: 7630
I read (and I agree) that what is currently taught in the first 2-3 years of college can / should be taught to most students by the time they graduate high school and that college should essentially be a masters' program...Was it Johns Taylor Gatto?
 
Old 12-03-2011, 09:27 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,454,643 times
Reputation: 10476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
This is a testimony to how badly we've dummied down education. 50 years ago, most college bound freshmen wouldn't have been capable of taking a class for college credit and they shouldn't have been. College was college back then. Now it's just an extension of high school. That 9th graders are, routinely, taking classes for college credit is really egg on our faces. It shows the world just how easy college has become here.

Seriously, what percentage of college bound students should be capable of taking a college level class (that's what AP is supposed to be) a full 4 years before they're old enough to go to college? Have college level classes really been dummied down to the point that most college bound freshmen are capable of taking them at the age of 13 or 14? No wonder this country is failing.
I disagree. Our kids are using a newer version of the college textbook I used in college, same basic material (history). Sure, it's hard but they seem up to the challenge. I think more is the case that back when we were in school they didn't push us enough. Our kids are easily a year ahead in math and science from when I was in high school, and at the time, my high school was ranked one of the top in the nation. Even DH says, the guy that can do calculus in his head, that the kids are doing more challenging work in high school then he ever did--graduated at the top of his class in high school and in college.

Also, kids here in 9th grade are 14, almost 15 since the kindergarten cut off is 5 on Sept 1st.
 
Old 12-03-2011, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,754,018 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
I disagree. Our kids are using a newer version of the college textbook I used in college, same basic material (history). Sure, it's hard but they seem up to the challenge. I think more is the case that back when we were in school they didn't push us enough. Our kids are easily a year ahead in math and science from when I was in high school, and at the time, my high school was ranked one of the top in the nation. Even DH says, the guy that can do calculus in his head, that the kids are doing more challenging work in high school then he ever did--graduated at the top of his class in high school and in college.

Also, kids here in 9th grade are 14, almost 15 since the kindergarten cut off is 5 on Sept 1st.
If it's typical for 14 to 15 year old college bound students to be able to do college level work, is it really college level work???? I don't think so. If 14 year olds can do the work, it's really high level 9th grade work not college level work. I find that a sad testimony to the quality of education in this country.

So they're almost 15 .. do you really think that makes this more palletable??? What that means is that what is passing for college level work is really work higher performing 14 or 15 year olds can handle. Still very sad.... I think there should be a difference between what a college bound 9th grader can handle and what an actual college student can handle. IMO, there is something really wrong here. College has, obviously, been dummied down to 9th grade and that is sad.

This is just more proof that a college degree is nothing more than a high school diploma in disguise.
 
Old 12-03-2011, 10:42 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,454,643 times
Reputation: 10476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
If it's typical for 14 to 15 year old college bound students to be able to do college level work, is it really college level work???? I don't think so. If 14 year olds can do the work, it's really high level 9th grade work not college level work. I find that a sad testimony to the quality of education in this country.

So they're almost 15 .. do you really think that makes this more palletable??? What that means is that what is passing for college level work is really work higher performing 14 or 15 year olds can handle. Still very sad.... I think there should be a difference between what a college bound 9th grader can handle and what an actual college student can handle. IMO, there is something really wrong here. College has, obviously, been dummied down to 9th grade and that is sad.

This is just more proof that a college degree is nothing more than a high school diploma in disguise.
Again, it hasn't been dumbed down, the kids are accelerated. They certainly could not do upper level college math (well most of them anyway) at this point but these are 100 level college classes-the AP classes are.
 
Old 12-03-2011, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,754,018 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
I read (and I agree) that what is currently taught in the first 2-3 years of college can / should be taught to most students by the time they graduate high school and that college should essentially be a masters' program...Was it Johns Taylor Gatto?
If it's typical for college bound 9th graders to be able to do college level work, there is something VERY WRONG HERE. College isn't college at all if this is the case. It's high school in disguise and high school is middle school in disguise. Reality is, for the average graduate who doesn't take AP classes, high school would be the equivalent of an 8th grade education of yesteryear.

Interesting, the education level appears to be the same as it was back when most kids didn't go past 8th grade. It just takes us 4 more years to teach the material now. I'd say we're coddling our children BIG TIME!!
 
Old 12-03-2011, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,754,018 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Again, it hasn't been dumbed down, the kids are accelerated. They certainly could not do upper level college math (well most of them anyway) at this point but these are 100 level college classes-the AP classes are.
The kids aren't accelerated if it's typical for a college bound 9th grader.... It's TYPICAL of a college bound 9th grader!!!! You said that MOST college bound 9th graders are capable of AP classes. That makes AP classes classes that MOST college bound 9th graders are capable of taking in 9th grade. That makes it typical!!!!

You aren't talking about a select few (like my dd and the other two kids who are on track to graduate with up to 2 years of college done in our district of over 5000 high school students). You're talking what MOST college bound 9th graders are capable of. My dd and the other two students (in her "grade" - our district identifies 2-3 kids in every grade capable of this program)) won't be taking AP classes. They will be bussed to the local community college for classes. I'm starting to understand why. AP, apparently, is what most college bound students can do at whatever age. These kids need college classes.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top