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Old 12-11-2011, 02:17 PM
 
9,965 posts, read 11,828,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatRoy1 View Post
According to my parents, in the past a HS diploma meant that you had acquired certain academic skills. For example, if you hired HS graduates as store clerks/cashiers you could reasonably assume that they knew how to figure out what 10% off would come to, could read labels, and, perhaps most important of all, could hope they would show up for work regularly and on time as they had demonstrated the ability to do this in order to graduate. Employers were willing to train young employees because they could expect that they had a good grounding in the basics and they could build on that.
Your parents are right.
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Old 12-11-2011, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,020 posts, read 98,892,281 times
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Quote:
One of the jobs that requires limited training beyond high school is Certified Nursing Assistant. HS diploma, couple month's of CNA training, and pass the written and hands on test and you could probably get a part-time job and work your way up to full-time w/benefits.
Oh, you could probably get a full time job right on. But I wouldn't wish that work on my worst enemy. It's hard, it's a lot of responsibility, and it doesn't pay well. There is virtually NO opportunity for advancement, either w/o going on to further education.
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Old 12-11-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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CNA work is pretty thankless and grueling, particularly in elder care facilities (i.e. where most CNA jobs are). Most people who are doing it fall into one of two camps...those who are doing it temporarily and will be working toward moving up the ranks of nursing, and those who don't intend to do any further schooling and have few other job prospects.
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Old 12-11-2011, 03:28 PM
 
701 posts, read 1,480,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
CNA work is pretty thankless and grueling, particularly in elder care facilities (i.e. where most CNA jobs are). Most people who are doing it fall into one of two camps...those who are doing it temporarily and will be working toward moving up the ranks of nursing, and those who don't intend to do any further schooling and have few other job prospects.
And to make it even worse, many CNA's end up with back injuries.

To reduce costs, facilities often hire primarily part-time so that they do not have to pay benefits. As a result, many CNAs work a couple jobs to make ends meet. But this is not all that unusual for those in lower paying jobs these days.
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Old 12-11-2011, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Arkansas
1,229 posts, read 2,769,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
You don't need a high school diploma for some jobs today.

You can be a trash collector, a garbageman, a janitor, a retail salesperson, a construction laborer, a delivery driver, a short order cook, a cosmetologist (working in a hair salon), a funeral assistant, a garment worker, etc. These are jobs that certainly did not require a degree years ago.

Some jobs require a high school diploma, but not much more - library technician, fire fighter, police officer, plumber/electrician (may require training beyond the hs diploma though), appliance repair (again may require training beyond HS). There are jobs that don't require college, certainly.

You are wrong about plumbers and electricians in MOST states. I can't speak of what all the regulations are in all of them but in my state both are required to go to trade school for 4 years and obtain on the job training while going to school (electrician's here are required to have 8000 hours of on the job training) before they are even allowed to test for their license. My husband is an electrician and licensed in multiple states which all have similar requirements.

http://www.state.ar.us/labor/faqs/faqs_p2.html#1 (broken link)

Last edited by sherrenee; 12-11-2011 at 07:16 PM..
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Old 01-13-2012, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Brazil
234 posts, read 717,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
Economic influences. More folks with degrees without jobs, the less likely a high school diploma is good enough. Employers will high a person with a degree quicker than a high school diploma, most of the time..
Today people who goes to college not necessarily mean they will end up with a job. I can give you one example a Teacher. What a waste of college time and money.

SAD i know.
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