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Old 02-02-2012, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,250 posts, read 6,125,547 times
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Hi All,

I will definitely post back with what we hear.

As for this week, I started leaning on the sprout big time. Regardless of the cause, he needs to get with the program. Seems like he can learn pretty well to me. Just this week, with some incentives and praise, and nightly timed reading, he has shot from 55 words per minute up to 84, which is the standard for the end of 2nd grade. Comprehension is 3rd grade level. Math too. Seems to pick things up real fast with the evil eye or a video game as reward. Unfortunately, I cannot be there every day, so extrinsive rewards are only part of the equation. He is on nightly reading and writing detail until everything is up to snuff. He whipped out a written paragraph (4 sentences) in under 5 minutes, and Mom and I carried on like he had won the Super Bowl (he spiked his pencil and moonwalked across the kitchen....). He loved all the praise and good attention for once. And we enjoyed it too.

It will be interesting to see where all this ends up.
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Old 02-03-2012, 07:13 AM
 
2,594 posts, read 2,444,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbill View Post
Do not let them put your son in special education. The special education population is mostly boys. Why is that? Because elementary school teachers will diagnose boys based on their behavior and maturity. Boys want to play, wrestle and be outside. The schools now demand that these children sit on their butts and do dittos, listen to an adult talk, and read about stuff that is really boring. This scares a mostly female staff that want nice little boys to be in their classes. Secondly, schools get paid more money by the state and federal government for special education students. Lastly, the school district special education staff; teachers, speech and language, psychologists and so forth need job security and numbers. You do not have to let complete strangers label you child as having a learning disability, emotional disability, autism or any other medical term they want to call your child.
While the point about boys being overdiagnosed has merit, the overall attitude is completely wrong. Spec ed is not generally for too-active boys. That's adhd and meds. Adhd alone actually does NOT get you into spec ed, at least in my district, so those are two separate issues. As I said before, spec ed usually just means extra services in the classroom and a plan that the parents work out along with a school committee, so those active boys are not leaving the classroom anyway. Teachers don't recommend spec ed for over-activity (they might recommend, incorrectly, meds, but not spec ed). The crap about money also doesn't make sense - large spec ed numbers do not look good for a school, and the money the school gets is usually far removed from the people making the placement, who have no control it or even an understanding of how that money is obtained or spent. In my experience spec ed is a money-coster for a school, not a money-maker. So most likely whatever money they get doesn't come fast enough or sufficient enough to cover costs. Finally, spec ed teachers have more job security than probably any other profession I know of - they are the one specialty that is considered a "critical need" and a shortage no matter what the economy is like. And I know from personal experience that adding another kid to the roster is just more work for over-worked people, hardly a cause to celebrate. Just try getting your kid into spec ed and see how happy they are to sign him up.

Last edited by toobusytoday; 02-03-2012 at 08:37 AM.. Reason: Removed rude comment
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Old 02-03-2012, 06:59 PM
 
31,950 posts, read 37,975,429 times
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As a parent with 2 children that have been diagnosed as being on the spectrum, I thankful for things like this: Jowonio School

Syracuse Autism Developmental Evaluation Center Margaret L. Williams

Seek out as many professional opinions as you can.
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Old 02-03-2012, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Middle America
18,245 posts, read 15,702,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
Hi All,

I will definitely post back with what we hear.

As for this week, I started leaning on the sprout big time. Regardless of the cause, he needs to get with the program. Seems like he can learn pretty well to me.
Autism (whether or not your kid has it) doesn't necessarily occur hand in hand with learning delays, of course. I work with kids every day with serious academic skills, but who struggle due to maladaptive behavior brought on by their sensory processing deficits. Some of my kids have autism and intellectual impairments. Some don't.

Quote:
Just this week, with some incentives and praise, and nightly timed reading, he has shot from 55 words per minute up to 84, which is the standard for the end of 2nd grade. Comprehension is 3rd grade level. Math too. Seems to pick things up real fast with the evil eye or a video game as reward. Unfortunately, I cannot be there every day, so extrinsive rewards are only part of the equation. He is on nightly reading and writing detail until everything is up to snuff. He whipped out a written paragraph (4 sentences) in under 5 minutes, and Mom and I carried on like he had won the Super Bowl (he spiked his pencil and moonwalked across the kitchen....). He loved all the praise and good attention for once. And we enjoyed it too.
Positive reinforcement is the best thing you can do, all around.
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Old 02-05-2012, 10:27 AM
 
898 posts, read 729,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
My school has asked for the second time that we have our 8 year old, second grade child "evaluated" for Austistic spectrum disorders. He is a bright boy with a big interest in dinosaurs, pokemon, and dragons. He is very articulate with a large vocabulary, but he is prone to meltdowns in which he claims the world is out to get him, when he does not get his way. Major drama. However, he is very sweet and affectionate most of the time. He is falling behind in his schooling because (I just learned today) he does not do his writing or his math assignments. Because he is willful and volatile, his teacher does not confront him, and he slacks or daydreams.

The school wants to put him in Special Ed to get some additional funding to help him with some learning and coping. My wife heard this and is outraged. She thinks this is a life sentence, and that he will never be able to gainfully support himself. She also thinks ASD is catch all for far too many kids. Frankly, he does not fit the descriptions very well, being social, verbal, and quite empathetic.

I think the SpEd may help him through the rough patches, since he has many obvious strengths. But I worry if he will be stigmatized or treated with lower expectations. Can anyone tell me what Special Ed really is? Examples of people who went into SpEd and went to college and graduate school, or othewise to fully successful lives? Cinderella (or CinderFellah!) stories needed!
She might be on to something. Your child not paying attention, or "slacking and daydreaming" maybe be due to other problems like maybe he's being bullied or his friends are influencing your child to fall behind, like peer pressure or something. Maybe his activities like Pokemon is distracting him, Lord knows it's so much easier to want to have fun than to do homework.

I normally don't respond to posts involving children, but this bought back bad memories when my school tried to put me into SpecEd when I was in grade school. My grades were good, but for some reason the school considered me "special" and once your child gets labeled that way there's some serious social ramifications later on in his/her life that might be very hard to shake off. Part of also why my school work did suffer at some point was because I was also bullied alot which my parents were very useless into helping without fighting amongst each other which can also be very traumatizing for a child, losing even more concentration in school so it just becomes one downward spiral.

Don't let your school do that for your child because some physician uses a catch phrase for a diagnosis, you know your child deserves better than this. Your wife is on to something, trust me.

If I were you, I'd fight the school on this.
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Old 02-05-2012, 12:41 PM
 
10,461 posts, read 16,967,522 times
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Crackpot - Perhaps you should have read this whole thread. Many of us have pointed out that getting an IEP does not mean that a student is automatically put in "Special Ed" and there is no special ed like there used to be. At least not in any of the school districts that I know about. What it means is that together a team of people, including the parents, go over a diagnosis and figure out a particular plan to help the student. I never understand when people think that schools somehow stay the same for even five years. Just like every other part of our lives, schools and education change and evolve quite quickly.
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Old 02-06-2012, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Middle America
18,245 posts, read 15,702,316 times
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What special education entails is something many people assume they are well-versed on due to past experience (often in the quite distant past), versus what it is today...very few people are aware, for instance, that the designation also covers gifted students. Special education is not synonymous with disabled (although one can certainly be disabled AND gifted). All special education does is assure that the student's education is individualized, regardless of the reason such individualization is necessary.
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Old 02-07-2012, 06:34 AM
Status: "NO MORE TURNING AWAY" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Heart of TEA country--Livingston County, MI
7,714 posts, read 10,525,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
What special education entails is something many people assume they are well-versed on due to past experience (often in the quite distant past), versus what it is today...very few people are aware, for instance, that the designation also covers gifted students. Special education is not synonymous with disabled (although one can certainly be disabled AND gifted). All special education does is assure that the student's education is individualized, regardless of the reason such individualization is necessary.

There is a provision in IDEA for gifted? Is that covered in sectioon 1400?
Has the goverment allocated funds for gifted under IDEA? Some states fund a gifted program, but as far as I know there are no states that mandate funding and there are no legal requirements like an IEP.

SpEd, IDEA (Americans with Disabilities) generally addresses tha needs of people with a disability. We need to overcome the notion that disabilities are evil. I wear glasses because I cannot see straight. I have a vision disability. I need modifications in the way of eyeglasses to see.
The same is true for education. Some students learn diferently (LD) (I prefer this to learning disabled) and the system has to provide education in a way that is meaningful and beneficial to the student.
While there is no shame in having an IEP (there shouldn't be) there is no connection between SpEd and TAG / AIG students other than the pace at which they eacjh process information.
We as a society really need to understand the SpEd program and the students which receive services. The real problem is allowing the perception that SpEd students are some how inferior is ludicris. The problem is the system CANNOT fix what has been done outside the school during all the previous years, nor can the system fix it in just 5-6 hours a day when the students have to return to a less than stellar environment.
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Old 02-07-2012, 07:06 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,687 posts, read 9,024,773 times
Reputation: 9359
Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
There is a provision in IDEA for gifted? Is that covered in sectioon 1400?
Has the goverment allocated funds for gifted under IDEA? Some states fund a gifted program, but as far as I know there are no states that mandate funding and there are no legal requirements like an IEP.
No I don't believe it's mandated but some gifted do have IEPs--after all, IEP stands for individualized education program. Every kid needs one really, but they can be such a legal and paperwork nightmare that I hope the idea doesn't catch on. Gifted is not one of the 13 IDEA categories but there is a special subgroup of those called twice exceptional (2-e) where the child may be gifted and have learning disabilities at the same time--not uncommon, as 1/6 of those with LD may also be considered gifted.
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Old 02-07-2012, 07:48 AM
 
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In our school district (maybe all of PA, I'm not sure) gifted and LD students all get an IEP. The controversy here, sometimes, is that being classified gifted is done in the very early years, very subjective. I've often thought that if you tell a young child that they are gifted and then put them in a small group, all told the same thing, that they will perform better.

However, for the truly gifted, this is an extremely helpful label in MS and HS where they get an enriched education that I'm sure helps them. There are standards and many kids will not take advantage of those extra classes and do not use the IEP pull that they could. The IEP's for LD and gifted students also helps in elementary school when kids are pulled out for numerous things all day so that becomes the norm. Some kids get extra help for math, some for reading, etc.
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