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Old 02-24-2012, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Houston
471 posts, read 1,297,637 times
Reputation: 337

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This thirteen part series made a huge impact on me when I first saw it back in my h.s. biology class and I still enjoy watching it today. While obviously some of its material is dated - it debuted 30+ years ago! - much of Dr. Sagan's series dealt with The Big Questions, which haven't changed.

Would it be allowed to be shown to kids nowadays or is it considered dusty & quaint and is now relegated to the back of the equipment closet?


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Some details about the series........

* Cosmos - also available in book form btw - is not just concerned with astronomy or physics or science in general but also how humans relate to those subjects and how they've affected us

* up to that time, the most expensive series ever produced by PBS....and it shows: beautiful photography, shot all over the world, along with SFX which (mostly) still look pretty good

* Sagan has a way with words and can explain complex subjects in a way everyone can understand but without talking down to anyone

* awesome music choices by different composers, not to mention the hauntingly beautiful opening theme by Greek electronic musician Vangelis - listen and watch here

* yes kids, this is where the line "billyuns and billyuns" originated

* dvd boxset available at The Carl Sagan Portal

* Cosmos at the Internet Movie Data Base - includes all thirteen episodes you can watch, along with commentary by many fans

Last edited by Lije Baley; 02-25-2012 at 12:27 AM..
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Old 02-25-2012, 09:55 AM
 
654 posts, read 879,101 times
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Why wouldn't they be allowed to show it?
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Old 02-25-2012, 11:01 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,457 posts, read 16,416,956 times
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I can't imagine why they wouldn't--Rick Santorum isn't our president you know. I always did love Carl Sagan--I know people made fun of him, but he did a better job than anyone ever did of making the science accessible to the average person and I love how he intertwined his story with bits about history. You can get the entire of series on netflix and it's free streaming if you're a member.
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Old 02-25-2012, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Houston
471 posts, read 1,297,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleur66 View Post
Why wouldn't they be allowed to show it?
I just figured with the emphasis so many districts seem to place on using the newest technology in the classroom, and the emphasis on science in general, that showing a 30 year old documentary would be seen as something negative & damage their image at being on the cutting edge of education.
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Old 02-25-2012, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,779,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lije Baley View Post
I just figured with the emphasis so many districts seem to place on using the newest technology in the classroom, and the emphasis on science in general, that showing a 30 year old documentary would be seen as something negative & damage their image at being on the cutting edge of education.

I understand your point and you may be correct for the simple reason that there may be many other very good documentary/science programs out there. In fact, with all the cable and internet media sources, there might be way more. I guess another question would be if Cosmos would fit into a classroom schedule, 13 episodes, for example. It was good but there may be even better stuff, higher tech stuff out there.
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Old 02-25-2012, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Houston
471 posts, read 1,297,637 times
Reputation: 337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I understand your point and you may be correct for the simple reason that there may be many other very good documentary/science programs out there. In fact, with all the cable and internet media sources, there might be way more. I guess another question would be if Cosmos would fit into a classroom schedule, 13 episodes, for example. It was good but there may be even better stuff, higher tech stuff out there.
But what makes Cosmos special is that unlike so many other docs, then and now, it's not just a collection of facts - NOT that I am against the teaching of facts, so please keep reading! - but how it presents those facts and relates them in a manner "Regular Joe" people can relate to and without the candy-coated pandering style so many new docs and other science programs use now with their garish graphics & cutesy "hip" language (watching the Science Channel makes me cringe for that reason, and I am close to deleting it from my U-Verse favorites. The Discovery Channel was deleted 2 years ago for that same reason).
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Old 02-25-2012, 06:55 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 5,909,915 times
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We are not allowed to show any videos of any kind.
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Old 02-25-2012, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Houston
471 posts, read 1,297,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hey teach View Post
We are not allowed to show any videos of any kind.
Ouch!

Why not?
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Old 02-25-2012, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,713,317 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lije Baley View Post
I just figured with the emphasis so many districts seem to place on using the newest technology in the classroom, and the emphasis on science in general, that showing a 30 year old documentary would be seen as something negative & damage their image at being on the cutting edge of education.
You haven't been in a classroom lately, have you? The latest technology only includes the latest videos if they're on discovery streaming and are free. I use the world of chemistry video series made in the 1980's that Annenberg puts up for free (www.learner.org for those who are interested. You do need to register but they rarely contact you. When they do, it's just to tell you the site is down or just came back up.) It's kind of hokey for today's more sophisticated crowd but the content still works.
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Old 02-25-2012, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Space Coast
1,989 posts, read 4,469,114 times
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Some districts are very strict about showing videos. Back when I was teaching high school, I had to get approval from my department chair first. To do that, it had to be under a certain amount of minutes, and I had to explain in detail how it met the standards.
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