U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-04-2012, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Florida
1,074 posts, read 809,920 times
Reputation: 1415
I agree with the majority, and it's why we've chosen to homeschool our kids. They weren't pushed or prodded to learn to read and do basic math... they just did so when they were ready. My son read at 7 1/2, my daughter at 8 1/2. Now at 11, my son reads well above grade level, and at almost 9, my daughter reads on grade level (yes, she's only been reading for a few month and reads like a third grader!). It's been the same with math.

We're considering sending them to school again in the near future (they went to a debacle of a charter school that closed after 4 months... major, major problems there!), but I don't know if I want to bother, since it will be about high-stakes testing... I wish there were a happy compromise for parents who don't necessarily want their kids learning in 45-minute "chunks" and taking useless tests, but still want some learning to take place outside the home/away from mom. (They do take some outside classes, but I'm ready for them to spend several hours away from home on a daily or several-times-weekly basis.) We thought that the progressive charter school that we had found would be the answer but yikes, we were very wrong!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-04-2012, 01:51 PM
 
9,946 posts, read 7,270,701 times
Reputation: 8043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eresh View Post
I think most of us (including myself) agree that early teaching doesn't do much for the child and can even a detriment for a lot of kids, including my dd that I mentioned in an earlier post. The problem is that preschools (particularly state funded ones that are in a lot of states) are under a lot of pressure to get kids "reading ready" before they start K because of the high stakes testing that is making its way into earlier and earlier grades. For example, here in GA they start the testing in 1st grade. Not too many parents *want* their child held back in kindergarten, and they buy into the (what I firmly feel is a false) notion that earlier is better.
OTOH, many parents are keeping children out of Kindergarten for an extra year especially boys.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/22/fa...pagewanted=all

Quote:
In 2008, the most recent year for which census data is available, 17 percent of children were 6 or older when they entered the kindergarten classroom. Sand tables have been replaced by worksheets to a degree that’s surprising even by the standards of a decade ago. Blame it on No Child Left Behind and the race to get children test-ready by third grade: Kindergarten has steadily become, as many educators put it, “the new first grade.”

What once seemed like an aberration — something that sparked fierce dinner party debates — has come to seem like the norm. But that doesn’t make it any easier for parents.
There are no good studies about whether the practice is good or bad, but people are doing it. There are many states that are changing the cutoff date as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2012, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
74,430 posts, read 34,648,346 times
Reputation: 17832
My son's birthday fell in December so I didn't have to hold him back one year but I would have if his birthday was earlier in the year. He just wasn't ready.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2012, 03:11 PM
 
5,206 posts, read 4,953,942 times
Reputation: 5758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eresh View Post
I think most of us (including myself) agree that early teaching doesn't do much for the child and can even a detriment for a lot of kids, including my dd that I mentioned in an earlier post. The problem is that preschools (particularly state funded ones that are in a lot of states) are under a lot of pressure to get kids "reading ready" before they start K because of the high stakes testing that is making its way into earlier and earlier grades. For example, here in GA they start the testing in 1st grade. Not too many parents *want* their child held back in kindergarten, and they buy into the (what I firmly feel is a false) notion that earlier is better.
In our area kids are tested in 2nd grade. Those that "make the cut" have the option of enrolling in advanced academic courses. Those that don't make the cut stay in "regular" classes with their other "average" (or below average or merely above average) peers. After 2nd grade the kids are out of the advanced academic "screening pool". So at 7 years old, their academic track is set in stone.....

Or at least that's the way the whole process can make a parent feel.

And we wonder why 90% of the parents brag about their gifted preschoolers.



.

Last edited by springfieldva; 03-04-2012 at 03:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2012, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Space Coast
1,980 posts, read 2,489,900 times
Reputation: 2639
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
OTOH, many parents are keeping children out of Kindergarten for an extra year especially boys.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/22/fa...pagewanted=all

There are no good studies about whether the practice is good or bad, but people are doing it. There are many states that are changing the cutoff date as well.
I was referring to parents not wanting their child to have to do kinder twice.
Starting kindergarten a year late is becoming pretty common where it is allowed, and I wish more states would allow it. In my state, the cut off is Sept 1. While kinder is not compulsory here, they would then have to start 1st grade the following year. With all of the expectations our 1st graders have, including testing, I imagine that would make things even more difficult for the child. I like the idea of moving the cut off date to get around all that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2012, 06:05 PM
Status: "Happy Halloween!" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,219 posts, read 58,430,059 times
Reputation: 19733
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
OTOH, many parents are keeping children out of Kindergarten for an extra year especially boys.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/22/fa...pagewanted=all



There are no good studies about whether the practice is good or bad, but people are doing it. There are many states that are changing the cutoff date as well.
As you probably know, this has been going on for decades. It seems that every time the cutoff date is changed, it just results in people holding back a different subset of kids. For ex, if the cutoff date is Sept. 30 (as in my district), people hold back kids with "summer birthdays", which sometimes means May as well. If you bump the cutoff back to July, parents start holding back kids with spring birthdays.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 03:20 AM
Status: "Desperately searching for the grading fairy...." (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Whoville....
21,939 posts, read 16,271,152 times
Reputation: 11507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
As you probably know, this has been going on for decades. It seems that every time the cutoff date is changed, it just results in people holding back a different subset of kids. For ex, if the cutoff date is Sept. 30 (as in my district), people hold back kids with "summer birthdays", which sometimes means May as well. If you bump the cutoff back to July, parents start holding back kids with spring birthdays.
It's all part of the momolympics. You don't win of your child doesn't perform and if he's older, he has a better chance at performing. Too bad this logic doesn't actually work. Being the oldest kid in the class can leave them bored and bored kids aren't paying attention.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 06:38 AM
 
5,206 posts, read 4,953,942 times
Reputation: 5758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
As you probably know, this has been going on for decades. It seems that every time the cutoff date is changed, it just results in people holding back a different subset of kids. For ex, if the cutoff date is Sept. 30 (as in my district), people hold back kids with "summer birthdays", which sometimes means May as well. If you bump the cutoff back to July, parents start holding back kids with spring birthdays.
When it comes to making decisions like this, it's probably better to look at the individual child rather than their birthday.

A kid whose birthday falls right before the cut off date might be socially, emotionally and academically prepared to start Kindergarten. A child with a spring birthday might not be quite ready.

Readiness has less to do with being able to read and do math problems and more to to do with being able to adjust to a classroom/group environment. For many kids, it's more a maturity thing than anything else. If a child is immature, a parent might elect to wait a year to start K. The schools will work with children at all levels of readiness, of course.

That said, I personally wouldn't delay the start of K just to give my child an edge on ability testing.

Last edited by springfieldva; 03-05-2012 at 07:12 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 09:06 AM
 
346 posts, read 469,442 times
Reputation: 59
Default Redshirting for Kindergarden?

I have a 4 1/2 yr old daughter with a june 1st B-Day. She has been so sensitive and in the daycare that she has been in it was always a challenge moving up in classrooms.

I saw a program on redshirting on 60 minutes last night that go me thinking. They laid out pros and cons...

it seems with summer B-days it is a good idea if you have a child that needs more than the other kids - if they are a year older that helps them.

I took 2 kindergardens and I turned out pretty good. Do you think repeating kidnergarden instead of waiting for a year is a better recourse?

just wanted thoughts and opionions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 09:17 AM
 
3,244 posts, read 6,094,335 times
Reputation: 1926
Quote:
Originally Posted by blakeas View Post
I have a 4 1/2 yr old daughter with a june 1st B-Day. She has been so sensitive and in the daycare that she has been in it was always a challenge moving up in classrooms.

I saw a program on redshirting on 60 minutes last night that go me thinking. They laid out pros and cons...

it seems with summer B-days it is a good idea if you have a child that needs more than the other kids - if they are a year older that helps them.

I took 2 kindergardens and I turned out pretty good. Do you think repeating kidnergarden instead of waiting for a year is a better recourse?

just wanted thoughts and opionions.
Sounds like it would be a good idea in your case. We red-shirted one of our kids (late summer bday) and it was the best thing ever for him. He was shy and awkward when he "should" have gone but has turned into such an outgoing leader type with that extra year to develop. I have never heard anyone say they regret holding their kid....but I have spoken to plenty that say they wish they did. I held back and paid for another year of pre-school because I didn't want his friends to go ahead....but others just repeated K and the kids I know seem seemed OK either way.

I would advise to really focus on your own kid and what is best for her. If she needs another year to be ready - do it. Plenty of people will tell you "it's not fair" or "I was the youngest and I turned out OK"...who cares. Do what is right for your kid.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:15 AM.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top