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Old 10-22-2012, 03:16 PM
 
11,636 posts, read 20,430,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Thank you NJGoat. I will look into these books. Of course I thought about Anne Frank's Diary but I don't even know when that is discussed. I should look this up. These books you reference are just what I was looking for.

I sincerely hope it is taught in schools and never brushed under the rug as too unpleasant for our children. We need to let our children know how each individual can affect history. i remember some rather good children's stories about families who hid Jews during the Holocaust and about how so many were adopted to save their lives.
In my area there was a lot of controversy about teaching the Holocaust in school. Many high school teachers would assign Night and there were some parents who felt that it was to heavy for high school students. I disagree, but there has been controversy about what to teach and when.
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Old 10-22-2012, 03:27 PM
 
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Its taught in history classes almost universally in grade school, maybe 4th or 5th grade. I mean, they don't dwell on it, but it's covered. Really guys, as tragic as it is, world history is a collection of reading about massacres and wars. My daughter asked questions about it starting when she was about 10, and I gave her a copy of the Diary of Ann Frank (one I picked up in Holland).

Likewise, even growing up in the late 60's and early 70s, we were taught in grade school and as I remember in 6th grade at least we were aware of it - watching videos and little microfiche readers a bodies being collected by bulldozers. As kids - the girls would be grossed out and the boys would be horrifically curious. Children are more reselient and able to handle this then you think. It's not some horrific mystifying subject that will harm a child, but of course it must be explained in context. A child will draw their own conclusions. Any contraversy is silly, created by overprotective parents and authority figures.
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Old 10-22-2012, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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I can't answer this from my own personal experience, because when I was in third grade, the holocaust hadn;t happened yet.

But I can't think of any reason why it shouldn't simply be incorporated into the fabric of the history within which it took place. Just like Slavery, or the times of Jesus, or the discovery of America and the Conquistadors or the Vietnam War, or any other historical event.
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Old 10-22-2012, 05:20 PM
 
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My fifth grade granddaughter is reading Number the Stars by Lois Lowry in class.

I would say the topic is probably started in middle school and continues into high school history though I don't think it is covered in any great depth.

Some other books:
I Never Saw Another Butterfly by Hana Volavkova

We joined the Butterfly Project at the Houston Holocaust Museum by reading the book and making butterflies to send when my granddaughter was 8. Apparently, you can still participate as it ends June of 2013.

The Butterfly Project


The Shadow Children by Steven Schnur
The Night Crossing by Karen Ackerman
One Yellow Daffodil: A Hannukah Story by David A. Adler
Sheltering Rebecca by Mary Baylis-White
Hide and Seek by Ida Vos
We Remember the Holocaust by David A. Adler
I Was There by Hans Peter Richter
Life in the Shetetl; Scenes and Recollection by Ilex Beller
The Grand Mosque of Paris: A Story of How Muslims Rescued Jews During the Holocaust by Karen Gray Ruelle and Deborah Durland Desaix

There are many more.

For high school students, I recommend:
A Daughter's Gift of Love: A Holocaust Memoir by Trudy Birger and Jeffrey M. Green

One thing that we must do is remember. There are also documentaries and films. Shindler's List comes to mind.
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Old 10-22-2012, 06:02 PM
 
Location: The analog world
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Fourth grade: Number the Stars was read aloud to the class, but there was no specific unit on the Holocaust.

Seventh grade: Quarter-long unit on the events leading up to and including the holocaust. Literature included Night.
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Old 10-23-2012, 04:01 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,875 posts, read 42,076,783 times
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What passes for in-depth around 8th or 9th grade in US History. That's when The Diary of Anne Frank is a reading. Again in World History.

You have to remember that what's emphasized is whatever the curriculum writers say so you have that input. Also, with systems adhering to pacing guides and testing you don't get the depth.

The other reality is that so many topics have to be covered in any generalized History class that you can't really spend much time on anything.

An example would be AP World History. Textbooks are typically 40 chapters which means that you have roughly 30 weeks to cover them until the AP exam in May. That plays hell getting done when you only see the class every other day on an A/B Block schedule (some weeks you see them three times the next week twice).

Also, European events like the Holocaust have been deemphasized across the board in all general interest History classes. In AP World only 25% of the recommended curriculum is Europe.
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Old 10-23-2012, 07:27 AM
 
1,677 posts, read 2,056,854 times
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I read The Diary of Anne Frank probably around age 11-12, but didn't learn anything about the holocaust in school until my junior year of high school. A good book for children about the holocaust is a book called Daniel's Story, by Carol Matas. I read it as an adult, and was impressed with the simple yet accurate account of a Jewish child living in Nazi Germany. There are also several documentaries, but you will probably have to pre-screen those and decide if they are age appropriate for your 10 year olds.
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Old 10-23-2012, 07:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I can't answer this from my own personal experience, because when I was in third grade, the holocaust hadn;t happened yet.

But I can't think of any reason why it shouldn't simply be incorporated into the fabric of the history within which it took place. Just like Slavery, or the times of Jesus, or the discovery of America and the Conquistadors or the Vietnam War, or any other historical event.
Slavery is often glossed over too, at least it was when I was in school. I learned about the Civil Rights Movement in 11th grade...in fact, it was one chapter after the Holocaust. Wasn't taught about either one in any real depth until I took it upon myself to learn.
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:54 AM
 
14,780 posts, read 35,977,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
What passes for in-depth around 8th or 9th grade in US History. That's when The Diary of Anne Frank is a reading. Again in World History.

You have to remember that what's emphasized is whatever the curriculum writers say so you have that input. Also, with systems adhering to pacing guides and testing you don't get the depth.

The other reality is that so many topics have to be covered in any generalized History class that you can't really spend much time on anything.

An example would be AP World History. Textbooks are typically 40 chapters which means that you have roughly 30 weeks to cover them until the AP exam in May. That plays hell getting done when you only see the class every other day on an A/B Block schedule (some weeks you see them three times the next week twice).

Also, European events like the Holocaust have been deemphasized across the board in all general interest History classes. In AP World only 25% of the recommended curriculum is Europe.
All excellent points. Unfortunately in most public school history courses you aren't getting much more then Monty Pythons "History of the World" out of the class. You will get a basic timeline understanding and memorize some critical facts, enough to "know what happened and when", but not anything approaching an understanding of the topic. It would be nice if more schools offered some elective history courses to explore some topics more indepth. In my high school, seniors were allowed to take a semester long course solely on Vietnam. It still didn't cover "everything" but was far more indepth then the 2 day footnote it was treated as in the regular US History courses.
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Maine
2,270 posts, read 5,738,128 times
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My daughter did a report on Anne Frank's Diary in 5th grade. That seemed like a good age for her to read it. She actually really got into that project.
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