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Old 10-22-2012, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,472 posts, read 43,558,753 times
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Actually I don't even remember if I was ever taught about the Holocaust in school but it seems like I have known about it forever. I remember watching documentaries about it, seeing films of liberating armies and seeing photos of bodies and shoes. Is it even taught in school and how?

Today I was looking at a news story about the oldest survivor of Auschwitz passing at age 108 and my 10 yo daughter was right beside me. She had some questions and i tried to be as truthful as I could without giving her more info than she could handle. Are there any *childrens books* on the topic? Any information would be appreciated.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Are there any *childrens books* on the topic? Any information would be appreciated.

Use your library's search tool to search for Holocaust filtered to juvenile literature.

Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Is it even taught in school and how?
Probably not in Iran.
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:02 PM
 
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I've long been fascinated with WW2 as my posts in the history forum would suggest, but you got me thinking. I honestly don't remember when the topic of the Holocaust itself was first taught/mentioned in school. Throughout the elementary years history was always taught as part of the general social studies curriculum and beyond basic facts, WW2 wasn't much more then a footnote. In middle school we touched on US History again for the WW2 period and it was at that time I remember a lesson about the Holocaust, though still mainly just factual that it happened. It was probably not until my junior year of high school in AP US History when the topic of the Holocaust was actually discussed in any level of detail. Even then it was mostly confined to a more factual presentation that it happened and the common reasons why, not really a total study of it. My sophomore year in college I took a class on the Holocaust that was much more indepth and specific and taught by an actual survivor, that was probably the time that shaped my understanding the most.

I did find this link, which describes how Holocaust education is presented in the US:
United States - Holocaust Education Report

Overall it is a topic that the states generally say should be covered, but as of 2004 only five have an actual curricula established on how it is taught. Even then the decision to cover the material and how in depth is often made at the local level. The site references that most kids only get around 20-40 hours of instruction on the Holocaust. The site says that most kids will gain some knowledge of it when they study US History at 10, 13 and 16. That generally fits with my experience on when the topic may have come up, but I definitely don't remember it being a topic when I was 10.

There are three books I have been aware of that are generally considered good reading on the topic for a child your daughters age:

1. No Pretty Pictures: A Child of War by Anita Lobel

Quote:
Few admirers of Lobel's sunny picture book art (On Market Street) would guess at the terrors of Lobel's own childhood. Here, in beautifully measured prose, she offers a memoir that begins in 1939, when the author was five, as German soldiers march into her native Krakow; Lobel's adored father, the owner of a chocolate factory and a religious Jew, flees soon after, in the middle of the night ("He had kissed me in the night, and I did not know it"). Deportations begin, and before long the author and her younger brother (who is dressed as a girl) are sent to the country, in the care of their Niania (nanny).
2. Behind the Bedroom Wall by Laura Williams

Quote:
Melodrama substitutes for conflict in this heavy-handed novel set in Nazi Germany. At 13, Korinna Rehme is just like the other members of her girls' youth group: besotted with the Fuhrer ("Hitler is the most wonderful man, Mother. Don't you think so?") and rabidly anti-Semitic. When she discovers that two Jews, a mother and young daughter, are hiding in her very own house, she is horrified at her parents' calumny.
3. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Quote:
The evacuation of Jews from Nazi-held Denmark is one of the great untold stories of World War II. On September 29, 1943, word got out in Denmark that Jews were to be detained and then sent to the death camps. Within hours the Danish resistance, population and police arranged a small flotilla to herd 7,000 Jews to Sweden. Lois Lowry fictionalizes a true-story account to bring this courageous tale to life. She brings the experience to life through the eyes of 10-year-old Annemarie Johannesen, whose family harbors her best friend, Ellen Rosen, on the eve of the round-up and helps smuggles Ellen's family out of the country. Ages 10-14.
Of course, I would be remiss to not mention Anne Frank's diary. That is still the seminal personal work most people read on the Holocaust. There are multiple editions, each geared to a slightly different audience age. I know there are versions out there that would be good for someone your daughters age. Just be cautious though as some of the more recent editions have taken to publishing less edited versions of Anne's diary that include her thoughts on her awakening sexuality and shows her more "teen angst" moments and anger with the people around her.

Last edited by toobusytoday; 10-23-2012 at 08:42 AM.. Reason: link and SNIPPET - three sentences please
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,472 posts, read 43,558,753 times
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Thank you NJGoat. I will look into these books. Of course I thought about Anne Frank's Diary but I don't even know when that is discussed. I should look this up. These books you reference are just what I was looking for.

I sincerely hope it is taught in schools and never brushed under the rug as too unpleasant for our children. We need to let our children know how each individual can affect history. i remember some rather good children's stories about families who hid Jews during the Holocaust and about how so many were adopted to save their lives.
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Old 10-22-2012, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
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It is taught here starting in the upper elementary grades. It seems like every reading list has some book about the Holocaust on it. One Yellow Daffodil, Number the Stars, Lisa's War and The Shadow Children are just two that they read in elementary school. It's taught as part of an integrated social studies/language arts curriculum.

They read The Diary of Anne Frank in 5th grade and saw a production of it in 6th grade.

I taught Night by Elie Wiesel to 9th-graders. It was a very moving unit about the Holocaust.

Honestly I think the Holocaust was taught more in the mid-90s, up to and after the opening of the museum in DC. Now I see more books with the Middle East conflicts as topics.
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Old 10-22-2012, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Volcano
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Although it is definitely not a children's book, perhaps the acclaimed and Pulitzer Prize winning graphic novel "Maus," might be suitable for a parent to read with a mature child. Wall Street Journal called it “The most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust.” And it's available at the Austin Public Library.

Maus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-22-2012, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Volcano
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
Honestly I think the Holocaust was taught more in the mid-90s, up to and after the opening of the museum in DC. Now I see more books with the Middle East conflicts as topics.
I think you're right... the pointing finger of historic emphasis keeps moving as populations age. The youngest of the actual survivors... the children who were born in the camps at the very end... are in their late 60s now. And their children, having heard all the old stories many times are respectfully, but naturally ready to move on to the events of their own lives. And outside of the Jewish community the Holocaust has begun to fade as Iran and the Trade Center and more recent events get stacked in front of it, just as the horrors of World War I faded behind it.

This is the dilemma. How do you keep the terrible warnings of the Holocaust alive and current for each new generation?
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Old 10-22-2012, 02:33 PM
 
14,780 posts, read 35,868,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Although it is definitely not a children's book, perhaps the acclaimed and Pulitzer Prize winning graphic novel "Maus," might be suitable for a parent to read with a mature child. Wall Street Journal called it “The most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust.” And it's available at the Austin Public Library.

Maus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It's a fantastic book, I've read it, but way too "heavy" for a ten year old, IMO. Maybe a very mature 12/13 year old read under the parents guidance; but there are concepts, issues and questions within that book that college students could spend entire semesters debating. I'd personally definitely put this one in the "teen" camp and then hold onto it so they can read it again a few years later and "get it".
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Old 10-22-2012, 03:03 PM
 
Location: USA
3,966 posts, read 9,390,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Actually I don't even remember if I was ever taught about the Holocaust in school but it seems like I have known about it forever. I remember watching documentaries about it, seeing films of liberating armies and seeing photos of bodies and shoes. Is it even taught in school and how?

Today I was looking at a news story about the oldest survivor of Auschwitz passing at age 108 and my 10 yo daughter was right beside me. She had some questions and i tried to be as truthful as I could without giving her more info than she could handle. Are there any *childrens books* on the topic? Any information would be appreciated.
4th grade around age 10 sounds about right. We read about Anne Frank and with heavily influenced Jewish culture for the rest of the year there after. It was almost like Christmas didn't exist that year at school. 5th grade with permission, would watch schindler's list and have discussions about it, but no Jewish culture influences beyond that.

I really think Anne Frank would be an awesome introduction. It's a really interesting story.
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Old 10-22-2012, 03:13 PM
 
11,636 posts, read 20,378,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Actually I don't even remember if I was ever taught about the Holocaust in school but it seems like I have known about it forever. I remember watching documentaries about it, seeing films of liberating armies and seeing photos of bodies and shoes. Is it even taught in school and how?

Today I was looking at a news story about the oldest survivor of Auschwitz passing at age 108 and my 10 yo daughter was right beside me. She had some questions and i tried to be as truthful as I could without giving her more info than she could handle. Are there any *childrens books* on the topic? Any information would be appreciated.
My kids read Anne Frank's diary in 5th grade. My son also read Number the Stars on his own. My older boys learned about the Holocaust in high school history classes.
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