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Old 02-03-2013, 03:43 PM
 
3,764 posts, read 7,209,805 times
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Originally Posted by MCGINNIS2000 View Post
Yes, had a meeting at the school yesterday. The school is definitely on our side but it is up to the school board whom we don't meet with until Feb 12th. He started alternative school today (which happens to be in the same school he already attended). He is being allowed to make up all of his work he missed and the teachers are being very supportive. We were told though that even if he was expelled, since he is special eduction because of his IEP, they must provide him an education. That would mean them paying a teacher to come to our house daily to bring his work. It is in his IEP that his graduation exams be read to him so they woud also have to have someone read those to him at home. The assistant principal said right now he is on track to graduate next year (he is a junior) whether expelled or not. Hope he is right.

I've very happy to hear no criminal charges & that the transition to the alternative program is right within his school... what luck!

I'm a strong advocate for kids & for locked gun cases. Thank goodness some silly little kid didn't get a hold of that rifle.

And thank goodness the principal is so supportive. He must really believe in the goodness of your kid.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:30 PM
 
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Thanks for the positive comments. It has definitely been hard. He is 17 years old and should be more responsible. I also should have been more proactive. I hope they allow him to stay in alternative school but it is ultimately up to the school board. We don't go in front of them until Feb 12th. The principal has been great. They just know nothing is on his record so they are being suppotive. And he hardly ever misses school. I think he has missed two days in high school. I hope they will be as supportive in front of the school board.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Exeter, NH
5,204 posts, read 4,210,338 times
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The laws are in place to stop school shootings, not to stop hunting. Consequently, when it has been determined that no ill intent existed--combined with the fact that your son is a minor and has not fully developed the adult ability to foresee consequences--I would think the just thing to do is a warning, along with educating all the kids in the school about the incident.

Of course, our so-called "justice system" is far from just, and no longer even attempts to claim it is. Instead of following the spirit of the law and making just decisions, the emphasis is on following the letter of the law even if it results in unjust decisions.

It is an unfortunate side-effect that pretty much any law seeks to control the actions of the 99% decent Americans, in the hope of making crimes harder to commit for the 1% who are criminals. Too bad that the 1% who are criminals could care less what laws you pass.
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Old 02-03-2013, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,661 posts, read 2,984,857 times
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That was the best post ever. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:18 PM
 
Location: A little corner of paradise
689 posts, read 1,181,347 times
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Hi McGinnis. I'm a little late to the party here, but I may be able to offer some insight. I taught alt ed for 12 years, with the last 4 being in our district's "suspended expulsion" program. I'm in California, so I'll tell you how it works here. I imagine it will be somewhat similar where you are. When a student is expelled, they do not lose their right to an education. In our county, they would be sent to "community school," run by the county, to serve the term of their expulsion. As budget cuts got worse, our district established the suspended expulsion program to keep students in the district, and not have to pay the county for their services. Students being expelled for the "big 5" were automatically sent to community school, and the rest were sent to me. I had grades 6-9, and another teacher had 10-12. Among the big 5, unfortunately, is bringing a gun or knife to school.

Our expulsions were generally for the remainder of the current semester, plus one additional semester. In a case like your son's, as a teacher, I would request "early release" at the end of this semester, since it has only just started. In the case of an IEP, it only comes into play if the documented disability contributed to the behavior. For example, I got quite a few students from special ed, who came to me for having marijuana on campus. A student with, say, an auditory processing disorder, would not escape expulsion based on his IEP.

Our administrators worked very closely with the district office to make sure kids got as close to the correct placement as possible. Districts really don't want to expel students unless they are chronic behavior problems, or there is no way around it. Find out from the helpful administrator who exactly they speak to at the district office. Call that person and discuss the case with them prior to the expulsion hearing. Those hearings are usually a formality, the decision has been made, and you are just there to be officially informed of the decision. By getting in front of it, you may be able to have a hand in the final outcome. You can even talk to his alt ed teacher to see what possibilities are available. Our school staff was very flexible, and we would finesse things to create specific programs to meet students' needs. Kind of like knowing the secret menu at In N Out.

Because our program had the "bad" kids, there were occasionally parents of kids like your son, who did NOT want their kids in my class. I fully supported that. If a kid made a one time big mistake, it's not cool to put them in a room with angry, high, gangster, chronic fighter kids.

The most common choice was opting into independent study. With our district, students would come to school one day per week to pick up/drop off assignments. All work was done at home. How that worked with an IEP depended on the nature of the disability. We had a set independent study curriculum, but I never had a problem deviating from that for specific students. It sounds like your son's teachers are very supportive. It could be that your son is officially enrolled in independent study/home schooling, but his special ed teachers provide him with his assignments. They wouldn't be required to do this, but they may choose to.

If I were you, I'd speak to your son's regular teachers first and ask if they would be willing to provide hm with his work during the course of his expulsion. If they can, great. At that point, you call the district office and ask their expulsion person if they would allow that to happen. Again, if so, great! There may be some hoops to jump through, which is why you want to have the conversations before your hearing. Your son will continue to follow his established curriculum, just at a slightly different location, with a non-special ed teacher. That means you may have to fill in some gaps at home.

If you can't keep him tied into his special ed curriculum, ask to meet with the alt ed teacher and see how they run things in their classroom. Our school was set up like yours, where our alternative campus was on the same campus as the high school. Because I had 4 different grade levels, with students of widely varied ability, I taught everybody pretty much independently, anyway. While it may not have been "official," I had no problem asking for text books, workbooks, whatever a student had been working on, so I could continue with them in my class. For example, the majority of my students couldn't multiply, so as a class we spent a lot of time on basic skills like that. Occasionally, I would get a student who had been in Geometry, and I would allow them to work independently on that, with help from me, so they would not fall behind.

I appreciate that as a parent you are holding your son accountable, while still looking out for his education. I hope this has been helpful. If I can clarify anything for you, or provide any other info, let me know. Good luck!
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Old 02-04-2013, 12:12 PM
 
29 posts, read 41,259 times
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Wow!!! Thank you so much for this information. I will definitely start making some phone calls.
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Old 02-04-2013, 02:34 PM
 
Location: A little corner of paradise
689 posts, read 1,181,347 times
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I know it was a lot of info. I hope it was clear. Let me know if I can help.
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Old 02-04-2013, 07:37 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
1,137 posts, read 1,144,939 times
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After reading about your situation Mcginnis one would hope cooler heads would prevail but anyone who knows anything about the public education system knows that far too often it's run by reactionary self-righteous liberal blowhards.

If I were you I'd definitely seek legal counsel. This can often be quite costly. You may want to reach out to the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ) I'm sure that they would be very sympathetic to you case as well as your financial situation. There website is:

American Center for Law and Justice ACLJ

Best of luck and please let us know how this thing unfolds.
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Old 03-03-2013, 08:33 PM
 
29 posts, read 41,259 times
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I wanted to give an update. He was expelled for 365 days. The school board said they really did not have a choice. One thing that made me feel better was the fact that one board member told us that he had had multiple calls from teachers and coaches on my son's behalf. He will be fine. He is considered homebound and a teacher is coming to our house twice a week bringing him his work and administering his tests. She is a great lady who really seems to care. We are at least going to try to finish the 11th grade this way to finish his credits. We will see how it goes before we decide what we will do for his senior year.
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Old 03-03-2013, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,661 posts, read 2,984,857 times
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Jeez, that's really extreme for a first time thing. In this country kids have a right to an education, and that gets taken away if they do one idiotic thing.
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