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Old 04-01-2013, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
39,046 posts, read 37,675,762 times
Reputation: 73658

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
So all parents that send their kids to public schools rank money and relaxation first? That stupid statement disqualifies your opinion.
Yes, so many generalizations against public schools in that post that it's hilarious that the poster's username could be "Neutral."

My local public schools are in NO WAY becoming "more unsocial and unsafe" every day, and public schooling is an incredible ROI where I live.

If my local public schools were indeed dangerous, I would move before I would home-school. In fact, we chose our home based in large part on the school system. I could easily have a larger house in a nearby town if i wanted to sacrifice that, but I don't.

Last edited by BirdieBelle; 04-01-2013 at 02:20 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 04-01-2013, 02:28 PM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
1,202 posts, read 1,606,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
So all parents that send their kids to public schools rank money and relaxation first? That stupid statement disqualifies your opinion.
That's not even what the poster said. He/she just said he/she would have more free time and money if he/she sent his/her kids to public school. The poster is not accusing non-homeschoolers of anything. The reality is that people who send their kids to public school get 180 days a year, give or take, where they have at least 6 or 7 or more hours to do other things while their kids are in school. That adds up to a lot of time that could be spent doing other things, including earning some more income or relaxing. If you send your kids to public school, that is your choice, no one is accusing you of valuing money or relaxation above other things. But the reality is that you have more of an opportunity/time to earn money or relax than a homeschooling parent.
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Old 04-01-2013, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,751,010 times
Reputation: 17411
I can't even get my kids to brush their teeth and clean up their rooms with out trench warfare. I don't know how I'd be able to homeschool four girls 5, 9, 11, and 13.

Also, the kids in our district are high functioning students whose parents are themselves highly educated and proactive. There's a value in socializing and team building with upwardly mobile and motivated peers.

I would consider home schooling or private schools if our kids would be at risk of doing poorly in government schools.

Homeschooling may work for some people (who don't mind wasting the tax dollars they paid for government schools) but they wouldn't work for us and we are satisfied with our government schools.
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Old 04-01-2013, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,081 posts, read 3,062,520 times
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We homeschool. For our family, it is the better way. Presumably those who send their kids to public school also evaluate all of the options and have come to a different conclusion. Factors to consider include: the education, what type of socialization you want your kids to have, how old the children are, how the schools in your area are, your educational philosophy, what programs are offered to public schoolers/home schoolers, whether one parent can stay home or work an opposite shift in order to make it work, whether you want to be with your children pretty much constantly, whether you have the money and time to homeschool them, how confident you are in your ability to educate your children.... and the list goes on and on.

To answer questions:

Quote:
I took very intensive computer science classes in High School up to AP computer science 2. I also competed on the programming team in the tri-county programming competitions. How do you replicate such advanced tech learning enviroments in a home school setting?
Speaking only for my state (Florida), homeschooled kids can take classes at the community colleges for free through dual enrollment. Also, they can, for free, take middle school and high school classes through FLVS, which is Florida Virtual School. My son is taking 6th grade math now.
Quote:
My school offered a number of programs to take advantage of: computer science, criminal justice, NJROTC, vocational training, etc... How can a home school environment ever expect to replicate the sheer number of opportunities there are in a public school?
See answer above. Many homeschooled kids also do an apprenticeship when they're in high school in order to get vocational training.
Quote:
I believe that public school teaches you a lot about how the real world/social groups work.
I believe that spending time in the real world, which homeschooled kids do every day, teaches you a lot about how the real world works. Spending all day in a room where there is one adult in charge and the rest of the people were all born in the same calendar year and all live in the same zip code, where everyone is doing the exact same thing, and where a child drawing a picture of a knife or shooting another child with a bubble gun is worthy of a social worker's immediate interference, is not really preparing for the social realities of the "real world" unless that person is going to be a schoolteacher. Where else do you live or work under such conditions?

Quote:
Majority of homeschooled kids that I met (very small sample size) were not well adjusted socially. Is this a 50/50 thing or is this just a small minority?
LOL, probably half of the high school kids I meet are not well-adjusted socially. I think it's more of a teenager thing and not really anything having to do with being homeschooled. A public school kid can be as weird, normal, obnoxious, quiet, shy, outgoing, fat, thin, pale, tan, good at math, bad at math, good at reading, bad at reading, bratty, good, smart, dumb... or a million other adjectives, and it's just considered normal because "he's a kid." When it's a homeschooled child, though, any and all of those are attributed to the fact that he's homeschooling. Homeschooled kids are just kids, and they're just as annoying/awesome as the kids who go to public school.
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Old 04-01-2013, 02:47 PM
 
15,744 posts, read 13,171,628 times
Reputation: 19636
Quote:
Originally Posted by JennieAmber View Post
I know awhile back homeschool was almost a dirty word because everyone freaked out over their opinion of it being a non-social environment but now with public schools becoming more and more unsocial and unsafe every day (my opinion), has the opinion of homeschooling stayed the same or are there more people who would be inclined to homeschool their kids? If you have kids, did you end up homeschooling them when you thought you wouldnt? For those who dont have kids, would you be into the idea of it?

What do you think are the pros and cons for homeschooling and public school? Which is better in your opinion?
I am a teacher, I would absolutely never home school I high school aged student. I used to think I wouldn't homeschool any child, but having had a few homeschooled kids over the years who were pretty good I think it is possible to homeschool and do it well. Based on my experiences though those are the minority.

But like most things, I think a parent who is highly motivated, intelligent, and has good resource can homeschool the typical child. At least until high school.
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Old 04-01-2013, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,081 posts, read 3,062,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
I am a teacher, I would absolutely never home school I high school aged student. I used to think I wouldn't homeschool any child, but having had a few homeschooled kids over the years who were pretty good I think it is possible to homeschool and do it well. Based on my experiences though those are the minority.

But like most things, I think a parent who is highly motivated, intelligent, and has good resource can homeschool the typical child. At least until high school.
Why would your experiences be in the minority? As a teacher, you're getting the kids for whom homeschooling is no longer working for whatever reason. If those kids are "pretty good," then why on earth would you think that those for whom homeschooling IS working to the point that they continue homeschooling through high school are doing worse?

What magically happens between 8th grade and 9th grade that makes the highly motivated, intelligent and resource-seeking parent suddenly unqualified to teach her own child?

Most homeschooling parents, at least the MANY that I know, choose to use a rigorous homeschooling curriculum, participate in the state's virtual school, or else send their kids to the community college for dual enrollment by the time they get to the high school level... it's not like they're making up their own learning games for high school chemistry like they did when they were teaching their six-year-old to read, LOL.
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Old 04-01-2013, 03:05 PM
 
1,092 posts, read 2,762,526 times
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It really depends on what your school district (or one within driving distance) has to offer. There are many ways to supplement an education and remain in a traditional classroom for at least some of the day. There are also excellent homeshooling options that are offered by some districts that have students attend 1 or 2 days per week, or one's that have a teacher supply a curriculum geared just for your child and they come to your home once a month. John Hopkins CTY has an excellent Math and Writing online program for gifted students, and Stanford has a similar math program. There are a few other colleges that offer many different options as well, like BYU.

For high school, some community colleges have great concurrent programs as well. My son actually accelerated and graduate two years early and then spent two years at our community college because he was a bit too young (emotionally) to go to college out of state (his preference) until he was a little older. A neighboring city has an excellent high school attached to the community college I would have sent him to if we had lived there.

Your reasons for considering the option are important...
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Old 04-01-2013, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,751,010 times
Reputation: 17411
Quote:
Originally Posted by tercel95 View Post
Majority of homeschooled kids that I met (very small sample size) were not well adjusted socially.

Could be a cause/effect thing too. Maybe the kids had anxiety in the first place and didn't adjust well to government schools. The parents then resulted to homeschool. We knew such a family and home schooling appears to be working out great for them.
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Old 04-01-2013, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,432,439 times
Reputation: 7702
Quote:
Originally Posted by JennieAmber View Post
What do you think are the pros and cons for homeschooling and public school? Which is better in your opinion?
Homeschooling is for people who don't want their children to learn that the world wasn't created in seven days.

Public Schools are for everyone else.
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Old 04-01-2013, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,751,010 times
Reputation: 17411
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
Homeschooling is for people who don't want their children to learn that the world wasn't created in seven days.
Excellent.
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