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Old 08-23-2013, 09:23 AM
 
5,563 posts, read 7,642,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
I usually pair up the Rhode Scholars with the Gomer Pyles.

1. It helps the Gomer Pyles to learn it from others.

2. It tends to deflated the egos of the Rhode Scholars just enough to keep them grounded.

Each student is evaluated on their contribution. I am confident the scholars will do well, I am anticipating the Gomer Pyles to do better.
This for sure! Not to mention a lot of times kids learn more from other kids than adults because they are more likely to listen to the kids.
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Old 08-24-2013, 02:50 AM
 
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Oh, thanks for starting this thread! A kid who's grades are usually a C, D, or F in the class isn't going to make an A on the project.

I hated situations like this. There have been situations where I didn't put certain member's names on the project because they didn't do anything.

There was once a partnered Powerpoint presentation that we had to do. As usual, I got paired up with a slacker and I picked up the slack for them. Right before I presented the Powerpoint, I decided to delete the work that I did for the slacker. The teacher gave me a 50%. It didn't do much damage to my A-average, nor did I care.
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Old 08-24-2013, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
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And this team work done in school is not the same as team work in the real world.

In the real world you're not working (or not working) for a grade.
You have a product to get out. And other people have their piece of the project to get done. And if they are holding up waiting on you to finish you can betcha that management has been made aware of that and all focus goes to that person who is behind.

Oh there are still "I's" in teamwork out in the real world.

Real world teams do not behave at all like teamwork in school.
Yet teachers tell the students that teamwork will prepare them for their future in the job market.
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Old 08-24-2013, 09:07 AM
 
Location: San Diego
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Right, work done in school is not the same but all of the activities contribute in the overall development of a student. It teaches team work and enhances leadership qualities which, you know very well, are required for any kind of professional work.
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Old 08-24-2013, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheeeen View Post
Right, work done in school is not the same but all of the activities contribute in the overall development of a student. It teaches team work and enhances leadership qualities which, you know very well, are required for any kind of professional work.
But it is not easy to find the sweet spot of teams. You may match the right slacker with the right A-student but what if you don't? Then you deal with the parents of the A student if they have a failing mark for that project which brings down their GPA and may limit what college offers them a merit scholarship.
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Old 08-24-2013, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheeeen View Post
Right, work done in school is not the same but all of the activities contribute in the overall development of a student. It teaches team work and enhances leadership qualities which, you know very well, are required for any kind of professional work.
I rarely see "leadership qualities" emerge in 11-12 year olds and when I do it's usually the A student trying to get the slackers doing something. Then they usually give up and just do it themselves.

I think the better place is mid-high school and college where team projects bring out those qualities.

In elementary/middle/early high school most kids don't look at it as leadership but being bossed around.
And none of them want to be bossed around by their peers.
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Old 08-24-2013, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Denver area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
I rarely see "leadership qualities" emerge in 11-12 year olds and when I do it's usually the A student trying to get the slackers doing something. Then they usually give up and just do it themselves.

I think the better place is mid-high school and college where team projects bring out those qualities.

In elementary/middle/early high school most kids don't look at it as leadership but being bossed around.
And none of them want to be bossed around by their peers.
Trust me - this is exactly what happens in High School as well. Both my kids (who tend to be strong leaders) absolutely hated team projects if they were assigned teams. Because the kid who never shows up and is failing is failing because he/she does not care. Putting them on a team with hard workers doesn't change that.
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Old 08-24-2013, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
Trust me - this is exactly what happens in High School as well. Both my kids (who tend to be strong leaders) absolutely hated team projects if they were assigned teams. Because the kid who never shows up and is failing is failing because he/she does not care. Putting them on a team with hard workers doesn't change that.
At that age though they are more mature and understand "leadership" vs "bossing around".
I do agree though that it happens a lot and there's not much kids can do about it.
They can't kick that person off the team.

Might work better if they could and that person then needs to do all the work themselves.
That would teach a bigger lesson IMHO about "team".
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Old 08-24-2013, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Liberal Coast
4,271 posts, read 4,985,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
Trust me - this is exactly what happens in High School as well. Both my kids (who tend to be strong leaders) absolutely hated team projects if they were assigned teams. Because the kid who never shows up and is failing is failing because he/she does not care. Putting them on a team with hard workers doesn't change that.
It works that way in college, too. I don't know anyone who learned anything about leadership or teamwork by doing a group project at school.
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Old 08-24-2013, 02:40 PM
 
15,294 posts, read 16,844,720 times
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Some possible solutions:

First, reframe the conversation by using the terminology of teams rather than group work. Think of your favorite sports team and now call them a group. Have the students especially those who play team sports explain why and how the team works together and how it makes for a winning strategy.

Have team members share their individual strengths.

Have the students actually think about and discuss the meaning of teamwork.

Set the rules *and* do think about making special arrangements for kids who cannot for some reason work with a team.

Prepare for failure and restructuring.

See conflict as an opportunity and have kids practice resolving conflict before they start a project.

Allow time for brainstorming.

Teach focused communication.

Reward innovation.

Reflect after the project is done and have students evaluate what could have been done to make the team more successful.

Does this take more time? Yep, but it pays off.
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