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Old 09-22-2013, 05:12 AM
 
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DH and his siblings were products of private religious boarding schools (in their case, Seventh Day Adventist). DH hated it and vowed never to send our kids to one of those schools (it was never really an issue anyway, because our kids weren't raised SDA). Teenage kids need to see/touch base with their parents every day, and living in a dorm at age 15 to 17 under the supervision of a "house parent" is no replacement for a real parent. Those kids were so sheltered and isolated from the "real" world that many of them found themselves ill equipped to handle a lot of every day adult stresses and situations (i.e. drunk and pregnant).
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Old 09-22-2013, 01:16 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
6,394 posts, read 7,616,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Skeffington View Post
DH and his siblings were products of private religious boarding schools (in their case, Seventh Day Adventist). DH hated it and vowed never to send our kids to one of those schools (it was never really an issue anyway, because our kids weren't raised SDA). Teenage kids need to see/touch base with their parents every day, and living in a dorm at age 15 to 17 under the supervision of a "house parent" is no replacement for a real parent. Those kids were so sheltered and isolated from the "real" world that many of them found themselves ill equipped to handle a lot of every day adult stresses and situations (i.e. drunk and pregnant).
I don't understand the idea of a boarding school like you mentioned. Why have kids if you're going to send them to a school like that. This bolded part is why I don't like the idea of religious schooling. I have seen many people come from those who are not able to cope. The point is, sheltering your kids for religious reasons is not going to do them any favors in the long run. What are they going to do when they work with (or for) someone who is not the same religion they are?
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Old 09-22-2013, 03:40 PM
 
24 posts, read 23,504 times
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Go watch the movie "waiting for superman" then ask yourself that question again...

Public school is garbage. I should know, I am a public school idiot. If it was not for Google I would be a moron.
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Old 09-22-2013, 03:48 PM
 
12,701 posts, read 19,048,442 times
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Originally Posted by neaters View Post
Go watch the movie "waiting for superman" then ask yourself that question again...

Public school is garbage. I should know, I am a public school idiot. If it was not for Google I would be a moron.
That may be true of your school, but it certainly is not the case nationwide. It was because he attended public school that my youngest was able to dual enroll in GA Tech for his junior and senior years. I don't know of any private school in the area that matches that level of instruction.

My eldest was in private school in FL. He also dual enrolled, but with a community college.
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Old 09-22-2013, 04:13 PM
Status: "One more semester" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Northern VA (for now)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
So the general crowd is bad? That sounds like the bad points others and I have pointed out. Only half of school is academic. The other half is learning how to socialize. Those "distractions" from academia I like to call making friends and learning how to function.
I agree. I went from one of the best (test-score wise) high schools in Virginia to one of the worst (test-score wise) high schools in Virginia. As far as social preparation, the worse high school better equipped me to deal with different classes of people since it was the only public high school in the city, which is a large DC suburb, there were kids from all sides of the economic spectrum. As far as education, I think the schools were roughly at the same level based on my track.

As far as my opinion on private schools, I think it depends on your situation. If you are living in a place where your only other choice is an awful school system I.E. Washington DC proper, definitely do private school if it is available to you. I'm not having children, but if I had kids and lived in an area that had a solid, though not spectacular public school system I.E. Prince William County, Virginia, I personally would be wary of going private since I think a big part of this world is learning how to interact with people of very diverse backgrounds, even those who come from rough or otherwise imperfect homes.
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Old 09-22-2013, 04:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
So the general crowd is bad? That sounds like the bad points others and I have pointed out. Only half of school is academic. The other half is learning how to socialize. Those "distractions" from academia I like to call making friends and learning how to function.
Sounds great in theory but not all public schools do a good job of both. The public high school I attended was satisfactory academically but it lacked in promoting cultural development. The social "distractions" were centered around sports, cheerleaders and pep rallies. Subsequently I have an admittedly weak appreciation for the cultural elements of society.

If I was to have children I would strive to utilize the private schools or charter schools. I know there are better public schools out there than what I dealt with but I would feel more confident seeking out private or charter options for any future children. They would deserve better.
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Old 09-22-2013, 04:56 PM
 
Location: New Albany, IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
So the general crowd is bad? That sounds like the bad points others and I have pointed out. Only half of school is academic. The other half is learning how to socialize. Those "distractions" from academia I like to call making friends and learning how to function.
I went to a private religious school and I made friends. My classmates made friends. How did that happen?

Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
I don't understand the idea of a boarding school like you mentioned. Why have kids if you're going to send them to a school like that. This bolded part is why I don't like the idea of religious schooling. I have seen many people come from those who are not able to cope. The point is, sheltering your kids for religious reasons is not going to do them any favors in the long run. What are they going to do when they work with (or for) someone who is not the same religion they are?
I was not "sheltered" from other religions. I have made friends with Jehovah's Witnesses, atheists, Hindus, Muslims, Jews and various types of Christians (some of them are even related to me! ). I was not apprehensive to go to a university where the majority of my peers were not my religion. I have worked with (and for) many people who were not my religion. I did not have some sort of "mental meltdown" while staying in a country where 99% of the citizens were not my religion, and that religion was the official religion with the head of state also being the head of that religion.

If you're thinking a religious school means a cult, then I might understand where you get your opinions.
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Old 09-22-2013, 06:08 PM
 
Location: South Minneapolis
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Not all private schools are alike. The snootiest school in this area is a public high school in a fairly well-to-do suburbs where people tend to act better off than they really are.
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Old 09-22-2013, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
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Smile Looking back.....

When my parents moved to Florida, I was in elementary and we were then enrolled in the public elementary which was fine. Imagine my surprise after a couple of days that my parents were told they would have to find another school for me since I had a disability (vision) and my parents had only asked for me to have a front seat!

I wound at a wonderful private school. Even though it was middle school, those were great years. I learned so much; learned to study and I loved the way negative behavior was handled. Well, I was there 3 1/2 years and then, my dad lost everything and I went to public high school which I was (kind of) excited about. Huge school but I found out quickly that getting straight A's was not the coolest thing in the world. The first year was really hard; after that, I did make friends and all OK.

My own father felt really bad about taking me out of private; he had gone to a boarding school in MA when he was in high school so he understood.

Fast forward so many years - first child (girl) - she wound up at the same private school I went to but in a different city. She excelled there and was there from Pre-K to 8th. She did extremely well academically and I should have done things differently after that. First of all, she was invited to attend the high school (same location) as I went to but things were hard for me then and the public school in our district was superb. There was also another school (private/Catholic/but all welcome now) that encouraged athletes and she could have gone on scholarship.

Dumb bunny that I was, I didn't realize those options (2) would have been better than the public high school especially the one furthest away. She did graduate from HS in the top of her class and again, with a great recommendation from her principal, should have gone to Brown (his alma mater) but I thought that was too far away. It would have set her up for better life experiences. She did graduate but, IMO only, has not applied herself to her full potential.

Our son went to a Christian school from Pre-K to 8th and then to the public high school. As far as his heart and willingness to help us in our time of need, he is more willing to do so. He is still going to college and has a full time job; is almost to buy his first home and just is more serious about life.

What I would do differently:
(My own life) I would have not believed what my father told me and would have gone away to college and gotten it done. (I had to stay home, support my parents, not obtain any student loans etc).

(My daughter) Public elementary, private middle, public high school. They all find each other anyway but she would have picked up the good study habits in middle school. As it stands now, intelligence wise, so smart but around super wealthy people and I know that - some of which parallels my own life. She does have some very good friends but I know I made some mistakes. Should have looked for better fit even if it meant moving to another area.

(My son) I would not have done anything differently with him. He ended up with a learning disability but a smaller school setting was way better for him.

When our daughter attended the public high school, she had all advanced classes so the classes were smaller, great teachers, etc. Our son did not have the same experience but still had some very good teachers and he and I would work together due to his learning disability - he has now learned to compensate for it and does very well.

END RESULT - What my children tell me
My husband and I both worked - both self employed. I did have a grandma for hire who was with us for 20 years. She did not live in but came early and stayed late during the week. She was part of our family. Both say they are very independent because of us. They know how to do everything - change a tire, know how to play every sport, well versed in a lot of different things. They say they liked where they went to school and happy in their lives. (We just spoke about all this recently).
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:31 AM
 
Location: California
29,148 posts, read 30,834,659 times
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I went to public school starting in Kindergarten but when I got to high school I spent the first 3 years in a tiny (like..16 kids total all in one room tiny) Baptist Church/school a few blocks from our house because my parents thought it was "safer". They wanted to shelter me from the crap that was the 70's, at least that's how they saw it, and I can't deny that some of my friends and cousins were getting into tons trouble and didn't all live to tell these kinds of tales. I can't say it was a good thing or a bad thing, but he culture shock was hard, the fact that we were not religious and I'd never set foot in a church made it harder. I convinced them to let me go to public school for my Senior Year. It wasn't the HS I was supposed to go to, it was in another town, but again they thought it was "safer". I had a good time there but didn't really BOND with anyone or make lifelong friends or anything. Looking back I think I would have been better off in public school all along. I've always had a strong sense of self and had no desire to do anything that would get me into trouble. In fact, some of those 15 other kids in the Baptist school were there because they got kicked out of public school! I also got a sad education and wasn't at all prepared to go to college so I didn't. Who's to say if I would have, but I know the opportunities would have been there at least!

Moral: Not all private schools are worth their salt.
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