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Old 01-12-2014, 10:38 AM
 
3,475 posts, read 4,236,729 times
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Funding is important, but only if those in charge are spending appropriately. I can't get on board with increases in funding because I know what my local district does with influxes of cash: add off-site administration.
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Old 01-12-2014, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,498 posts, read 15,429,477 times
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I just don't know what it will take for us to be led by people with common sense.
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Old 01-12-2014, 02:06 PM
 
24,511 posts, read 33,455,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
How truly discouraging.

I have long felt that a school board with the power to tax is more of a threat to me, personally, than any terrorist organization. The town where I live is overrun with "refugees" who have been literally forced out of their homes in New Jersey (for example) by property tax.
Which town do you live in?
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Old 01-12-2014, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
17,032 posts, read 25,616,358 times
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Too much babysitting in schools today. Let alone all the $$$ spent on special ed and ESL type programs. Separate these special interests out, I bet money could be saved and teachers would be happier.
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Old 01-14-2014, 09:53 PM
 
3,928 posts, read 3,520,369 times
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Originally Posted by Oildog View Post
Too much babysitting in schools today. Let alone all the $$$ spent on special ed and ESL type programs. Separate these special interests out, I bet money could be saved and teachers would be happier.
My son is in a spec ed program at the public schools in my city since he is autistic. I am so thankful for the teacher, aides and the program that is helping him at this early stage. Autism affects about 1in 80 children so I think everyone needs to realize society has to change to accommodate different people with special needs. I am so gad to hear you call my child's education " babysitting". Very encouraging.
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Old 01-15-2014, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Johnson City, TN
19,743 posts, read 14,219,987 times
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I remember my senior year of high school when NCLB was really coming on full force that we had a kid with down syndrome in one of my advanced classes. The boy was doing well to behave most of the time, had to have a minder take him to lunch and bring him back, and ended up taking a good amount of teacher time.

People who have special needs have special needs, but there seem to be a higher number of students with "special needs" today than there was ten or fifteen years ago. Someone with ADHD may be involved in a "special needs" class when they could be fine in a regular environment with more guidance. I certainly believe in special education for the truly needy, but often wonder if part of the resource diversion into special ed is partly due to wrong or poor diagnoses.
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Old 01-15-2014, 06:17 AM
 
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In Pennsylvania funding has changed dramatically over the last 40 years. In the early 1970's the bulk of funding for schools was paid for by the state. Today, it's up to the local school districts (and we have 500 of them!) to pay for the bulk of that spending. Of course, the mandates by the states and the federal government has not gone down.... Because of that, we have districts side by side with very different revenue and spending.

Yankeemama, I'm hoping that Oildog's two comments about babysitting and Special needs were not connected. I think he/she meant that 1) There is too much babysitting in schools and 2) Massive amounts of money are spent on programs such as ESL and Special needs, as opposed to purely academics. Not that I'm on board with either comment, but I think that was his/her intent.
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Old 01-15-2014, 02:50 PM
 
3,928 posts, read 3,520,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
In Pennsylvania funding has changed dramatically over the last 40 years. In the early 1970's the bulk of funding for schools was paid for by the state. Today, it's up to the local school districts (and we have 500 of them!) to pay for the bulk of that spending. Of course, the mandates by the states and the federal government has not gone down.... Because of that, we have districts side by side with very different revenue and spending.

Yankeemama, I'm hoping that Oildog's two comments about babysitting and Special needs were not connected. I think he/she meant that 1) There is too much babysitting in schools and 2) Massive amounts of money are spent on programs such as ESL and Special needs, as opposed to purely academics. Not that I'm on board with either comment, but I think that was his/her intent.
I can't speak for other states but here in Oregon, to be exact, the city of Portland, getting help for special needs is not handed out freely. I have a friend whose child is dyslexic but child does not receive any spec ed at public school because the child's scores on standardized tests are not low enough. I know other people who have children with more severe dyslexia so their students have IEPs and receive accommodations in mainstream classes. All of these children are intelligent but need help with learning. This is a smart use of district funds. We need to help all children learn and succeed. My son is learning socially and academically in his school. There is so much talent and giftedness amongst students who learn "differently". They are capable of learning and reaching their potential. I am glad that Portland Public Schools is making efforts to help children that need the help. It is not easy to get diagnosed with autism or severe dyslexia. Even if kids are diagnosed with ADHD, they are usually in mainstream classes and do not receive an abundance of extra services.
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Old 01-15-2014, 06:19 PM
 
12,387 posts, read 26,570,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankeemama View Post
I can't speak for other states but here in Oregon, to be exact, the city of Portland, getting help for special needs is not handed out freely. I have a friend whose child is dyslexic but child does not receive any spec ed at public school because the child's scores on standardized tests are not low enough. I know other people who have children with more severe dyslexia so their students have IEPs and receive accommodations in mainstream classes. All of these children are intelligent but need help with learning. This is a smart use of district funds. We need to help all children learn and succeed. My son is learning socially and academically in his school. There is so much talent and giftedness amongst students who learn "differently". They are capable of learning and reaching their potential. I am glad that Portland Public Schools is making efforts to help children that need the help. It is not easy to get diagnosed with autism or severe dyslexia. Even if kids are diagnosed with ADHD, they are usually in mainstream classes and do not receive an abundance of extra services.
I can't imagine it's easy in any state.
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Old 01-15-2014, 07:06 PM
 
3,928 posts, read 3,520,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
I can't imagine it's easy in any state.
I am just making the point that to receive spec ed services, a child has to be severely impacted by a disability so when people say ADHD is over diagnosed... that doesn't matter. ADHD students attend mainstream classes and many take medication. Even if autism is over diagnosed, that doesn't matter either because Spec Ed services are provided on a case by case basis. Most districts are not "over serving" the spec Ed community. We sure are some people's scape goat when complaining about school district budgeting, though.
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