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Old 01-16-2014, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
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The one thing I don't like about the U.S. is the poverty. And the group of people this affects most is the children. One thing I hear over and over is that in this country is if your born poor you don't have to stay poor. But this is rare because if it were true our population in poverty wouldn't be so high. So my question is, How many poor school systems are actually good?
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:41 PM
 
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I think it has to do with the culture and emphasis on learning from the parents as much as the absolute income.

We were taliing in a local thread about the Oak Ridge City schools which are very good due the city's identity as a science city. But the wartime housing is getting old and cheap and poor(er) people from surrounding areas live there now. Of course there are plenty of upscale subdivisions so you wouldn't say it is a poor school system.

Is your question "is it possible to be poor and still have good schools for your kids?" I think the answer is yes for small towns and in some cities there will be low cost neighborhoods (or trailer parks) that happen to be zoned for highly rated schools.

Also Johnson City and Greeneville TN have some highly rated schools. These are small cities with incomes somewhat lower than the national average.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:57 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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In Ca you can't even have good schools in middle class areas lol.
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:43 PM
 
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Thomas Sowell - "The Education of Minority Children"
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Old 01-16-2014, 11:14 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
14,104 posts, read 9,854,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
The one thing I don't like about the U.S. is the poverty. And the group of people this affects most is the children. One thing I hear over and over is that in this country is if your born poor you don't have to stay poor. But this is rare because if it were true our population in poverty wouldn't be so high. So my question is, How many poor school systems are actually good?
I taught at a rural school with a free/reduced lunch (FRL) rate over 80%, they were ranked in the top 25% of the state. The two years before I went there I taught at an urban school with a 97% FRL rate that were ranked in the bottom 10% of the same state. Both were considered high poverty schools but they were worlds apart, especially culturally. They were different kinds of poverty and both the kids and parents had radically different attitudes towards schools and teachers. Honestly - I wasn't a better teacher at the rural school even though my students did better, I just had students and parents who didn't fight me when I tried to help the kids do better.
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Old 01-16-2014, 11:51 PM
 
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There are several "good schools" here in NE Portland with FRL over 75 percent but the yuppies are afraid to send their kids to school with the kids of the lower middle class and working poor. That's not the "kind" of diversity everyone in hipster Portland us talking about.
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Old 01-17-2014, 08:23 AM
 
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I agree that it has a lot more to do with culture than income. Individuals with higher incomes are more likely to be college educated and will place a greater emphasis on their child's education. Impoverished areas with a lot of parents who are high school dropouts are not likely to place as much value on a good education. I live outside of Detroit where the adult population has an illiteracy rate north of 50%. Unsurprisingly, it is one of the worst school systems in the country.

I think the key is identifying the parents who are involved in their child's education and getting them the resources they need.
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Old 01-17-2014, 08:31 AM
 
2,612 posts, read 4,604,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
The one thing I don't like about the U.S. is the poverty. And the group of people this affects most is the children. One thing I hear over and over is that in this country is if your born poor you don't have to stay poor. But this is rare because if it were true our population in poverty wouldn't be so high. So my question is, How many poor school systems are actually good?
This assumes that school is both a cause and cure for poverty. I'm not sure there is any evidence to support that belief, as widespread as it may be.

In my experience at a poor school, the instruction and facilities were actually superior due to federal money aimed at low-income schools. However, it wasn't enough to compensate for the poverty of the students, which remained untouched.
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Old 01-17-2014, 10:58 AM
 
Location: midwest
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I went to what was regarded as a good high school. I don't even know if they had an accounting course when I was there. That would have been more useful than 4 years of English literature.

Is our real problem how we define education?

Schooling is not education.

Quote:
I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.
- This quote has been attributed to Mark Twain

psik
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Old 01-17-2014, 03:24 PM
 
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My mom often talks about teaching in poor rural Idaho in the 70s where some of her students didn't wear shoes. But the school was ranked in the top 10% or so in the state and parent/teacher conferences had a 98% attendance rate.

On the other end of the spectrum I worked as a tutor in the Bed Stuy neighborhood of Brooklyn in the late 90s. We couldn't even get parents to answer a phone call let alone attend a conference.
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