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Old 01-28-2014, 06:55 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,502 posts, read 8,704,650 times
Reputation: 20786

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilCookie View Post
Funny, because I hang out around parenting forums often, and whenever a thread comes up with a parent concerned/looking for advice on teaching their 4-5-6 year old reading, writing, math, etc., they inevitably get flamed with a bunch of posters swooping in to berate them for pushing their kids, robbing them of their childhood, bombarding with statistics of how early literacy is useless/does not mean anything/is detrimental to future learning etc etc, and telling them to leave their kids alone, that all kids should be expected to do is play and run around, and that they'll learn everything they need to know at school.

Slightly hypocritical, isn't it?

Of course, in many parts of the US a culture of ignorance is alive and well, with generations of trash who are proud of being ignorant, illiterate, and dumb as a rock. There are probably still plenty of parents around telling little Billy to get his nose out of the book and go kick a football outside. Just look at the thread about the "My kid beat up your honor student" bumper sticker
I've said it before, and it clearly bears repeating: to be a parent is to be under continual assault. No matter what one does, somebody will find fault with it. I've spent too many years trying to comply with expert advice, only to find that I usually already knew what was best for my children. So much wasted time feeling guilt over supposed missed opportunities because I failed to latch on immediately to the latest parenting advice. Frankly, I'm over it.
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Old 01-28-2014, 07:00 PM
 
2,902 posts, read 3,327,290 times
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The $100 I spent buying Hooked on Phonics was one of the best things I ever did. Both of my kids used it when they were three and they both read above grade level when they started school. By the time they started high school, they were reading at college levels.

A little time and money teaching your kids to read is the best investment a parent could make.
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Old 01-28-2014, 07:50 PM
 
11,613 posts, read 19,680,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankeemama View Post
My husband and I taught our daughter how to read and was reading several grades ahead at age five and she still is reading and writing several grades above her grade now.
I assure you that when the kids graduate from HS you will not be able to tell who read at age 5 and who read at age 6.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankeemama View Post
.....We continue to stay focused on what is important and we feel academics is more important than soccer. Tell that to a bunch of soccer obsessed, upper middle class parents who have their kids eat in the car and go to soccer practice two times a week and at least one game on the weekend. Then the parents think it's the teachers' responsibility to teach their struggling kids how to read once they are already behind. I know if my second grader could not decode words but could kick around a soccer ball six hours a week... I would have to look at my own priorities as a parent. The parents I speak of do not have poverty or lack of education as an excuse for their attitudes towards their kids' education.
You know that kids can do both right? My kids didn't need every minute of every day to work on reading when they were in elementary school. The oldest (20) played 4 sports when he was in high school and got accepted to a top university with an ACADEMIC scholarship. The middle (17) only plays one sport, but he takes lessons on two instruments and has been accepted to a top program in his chosen field with an ACADEMIC scholarship. My youngest (14) also plays 4 sports. He is an exceptional student and I am sure he will also get an ACADEMIC scholarship to college.

If your non special needs child is smart she does not need every second of every day to work on academics. If she needs to spend that much time on schoolwork in elementary school she will certainly have trouble in the upper grades. Children should learn good time management skills at an early age. High school is too late for that.
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Old 01-28-2014, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 69,786,597 times
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I work in low SES schools.
Some of these kids have never had a magazine or newspaper in their home.
Many have never seen the inside of the local library.
The only books they get are from the school library.
The few projects during the year that require them cutting pictures from magazines have to be done at school and we supply the old magazines for them to use.

Why does this happen ?
I can't answer because I don't know why parents don't avail themselves of FREE books and magazines at the library.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:05 PM
 
5,413 posts, read 4,801,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sj08054 View Post
If you thought it was tortue for you, think about the kid who is terrified when it is his/her turn? I remember being one of those kid. With English being my 3rd language, I would count the paragraphs and student to predict which paragraph I would end up reading (practicing while not listening to what currently being read).

A lot of parents don't know the meaning of parenting these days due to various reasons.
English was only my second language and my parents most certainly expect top marks from me...upon penalty of being beat if I didn't measure up......but I did the same thing...reading ahead, trying to figure out what I would be called on for...and the sheer panic it involved.

Honestly, I have little sympathy today for someone that doesn't get that not everyone is the same as they are...and though my daughter has always been a phenomenal student, I'd have quickly taken her to task if she had ever expressed impatience with those around her that are trying to learn. I
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:20 PM
 
15,279 posts, read 16,794,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
I work in low SES schools.
Some of these kids have never had a magazine or newspaper in their home.
Many have never seen the inside of the local library.
The only books they get are from the school library.
The few projects during the year that require them cutting pictures from magazines have to be done at school and we supply the old magazines for them to use.

Why does this happen ?
I can't answer because I don't know why parents don't avail themselves of FREE books and magazines at the library.
There could be many reasons:

1. There may be no library with hours that work with the parent's work hours.
2. The library may be in an unsafe neighborhood.
3. Parents may have several children, no car and no way of actually getting to the library.
4. The parents may be uneducated and illiterate themselves and embarrassed about their own reading skills.
5. The parents may never have been read to or had books at home when they were children.

My friend who taught first grade for years in a Chicago inner city school, had all of these happen. She did several things. She took the class to the local library and got all the children their own library cards. We would go to the biggest rummage sale and buy books for her and she would level the books and give each child one to take home with them as their very own.

After many years, she began to have the children of the first classes she taught. Their parents bought books and went to the library and read to their children. The kids still needed help, but she now teaches the children of those children and they are closer to leaving the ghetto than their parents were. It takes generations sometimes to break the cycle.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:20 PM
 
3,932 posts, read 3,630,208 times
Reputation: 3044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
I assure you that when the kids graduate from HS you will not be able to tell who read at age 5 and who read at age 6.




You know that kids can do both right? My kids didn't need every minute of every day to work on reading when they were in elementary school. The oldest (20) played 4 sports when he was in high school and got accepted to a top university with an ACADEMIC scholarship. The middle (17) only plays one sport, but he takes lessons on two instruments and has been accepted to a top program in his chosen field with an ACADEMIC scholarship. My youngest (14) also plays 4 sports. He is an exceptional student and I am sure he will also get an ACADEMIC scholarship to college.

If your non special needs child is smart she does not need every second of every day to work on academics. If she needs to spend that much time on schoolwork in elementary school she will certainly have trouble in the upper grades. Children should learn good time management skills at an early age. High school is too late for that.
I respect your situation and I think you may have misinterpreted my situation. I am no tiger mom, really. I just have noticed families in my upper middle class area with two parents in the home, who have second graders who cannot decode words. This is a reason to be concerned. My point is that many of these families expect the schools to do the job of parents. Many of these parents are more concerned with after school activities than the BASICS. Reading is a basic as well as getting to sleep at a reasonable hour and eating at home. It may sound harsh but it is the parents responsibility to prepare their kids for school.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:28 PM
 
15,279 posts, read 16,794,260 times
Reputation: 15003
I would suggest that if we look at the countries with high literacy rates, we will find that children are NOT pushed to read early.

Let's Talk Books And Politics: Education in Finland: Are We Pushing Children Too Early?

Quote:
"The focus for kindergarten students is to "learn how to learn", Ms. Penttilä said. Instead of formal instruction in reading and math there are lessons on nature, animals, and the "circle of life" and a focus on materials- based learning."

"Reading for pleasure is actively encouraged (Finland publishes more children's books than any other country). Television stations show foreign programs in the original languages with subtitles, so that in Finland children even read while watching TV."
Research Finds No Advantage In Learning To Read From Age Five | Voxy.co.nz

Quote:
A University of Otago researcher has uncovered for the first time quantitative evidence that teaching children to read from age five is not likely to make that child any more successful at reading than a child who learns reading later, from age seven.
Kids should be encouraged if they want to learn to read, but they should not be pushed to learn before school age.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:31 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,502 posts, read 8,704,650 times
Reputation: 20786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankeemama View Post
Many of these parents are more concerned with after school activities than the BASICS. Reading is a basic as well as getting to sleep at a reasonable hour and eating at home. It may sound harsh but it is the parents responsibility to prepare their kids for school.
And if Mom (or Dad) has contacted the school and arranged for academic support, has she also shirked her parental duty? All kids need a balanced life, and some kids with learning issues also need a place to feel successful, like on a sports field, when they are struggling with academics. Please, people, put down your rocks. Raising children is hard enough without the constant stream of criticism from other parents.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:40 PM
 
3,932 posts, read 3,630,208 times
Reputation: 3044
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
I would suggest that if we look at the countries with high literacy rates, we will find that children are NOT pushed to read early.

Let's Talk Books And Politics: Education in Finland: Are We Pushing Children Too Early?



Research Finds No Advantage In Learning To Read From Age Five | Voxy.co.nz



Kids should be encouraged if they want to learn to read, but they should not be pushed to learn before school age.
My kids' school district has a goal that all first graders are ready to read at the beginning of the year and by the end of third grade are reading to gain knowledge in a variety of subjects. This sounds reasonable to me.
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