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Old 02-20-2014, 08:13 PM
 
Location: NoVA
7,329 posts, read 3,475,792 times
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Question from Pearson's FIRST grade math book, designed to be aligned with the core content.



How is this remotely developmentally appropriate? To answer it, a person must be capable of abstract reasoning, something a lot of middle school students can't even do.
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Old 02-20-2014, 08:17 PM
 
1,030 posts, read 621,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Question from Pearson's FIRST grade math book, designed to be aligned with the core content.



How is this remotely developmentally appropriate? To answer it, a person must be capable of abstract reasoning, something a lot of middle school students can't even do.
Where is 8 + 6 = 14?
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Old 02-20-2014, 08:27 PM
 
Location: California
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Is this one of those "grouping" math problems? Then D?

I don't know. I showed some of these kinds of things to my 23 year old and he figured them out and reminded me that nobody is seeing a question like that in a vacuum, and that they would obviously be taught this stuff a go over it in class, so it wouldn't be like me just seeing this with no context. And that thinking this way would come in handy when you get to higher level mathematics. I wouldn't know, I never got past beginning algebra.

My mind is old, his is younger and sharper, so I can't really say.
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Old 02-20-2014, 08:43 PM
 
Location: NoVA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceece View Post
Is this one of those "grouping" math problems? Then D?

I don't know. I showed some of these kinds of things to my 23 year old and he figured them out and reminded me that nobody is seeing a question like that in a vacuum, and that they would obviously be taught this stuff a go over it in class, so it wouldn't be like me just seeing this with no context. And that thinking this way would come in handy when you get to higher level mathematics. I wouldn't know, I never got past beginning algebra.

My mind is old, his is younger and sharper, so I can't really say.
Yes, the answer is D. It requires the child mentally bump one number up to the nearest ten and reduce the other number by that same amount. It is a useful skill to be able to quickly estimate answers, especially when you start dealing with larger numbers. However, this is a question given to FIRST graders. First, as in 6 & 7 years old. It is not within the realm of how first graders think, which is concretely. It simply defies everything we understand about child development.
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Old 02-20-2014, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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Oy vey. I fear we'll be seeing lots of this type of stuff. And when kids struggle with it, the reformers will pounce on public school teachers and push the privatization agenda.
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Old 02-21-2014, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Space Coast
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My daughter does the 8+6=14 in her head then chooses the choice that has 14 for an answer.
They're supposed to be 'adding by tens' or something like that.
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Old 02-21-2014, 05:08 AM
 
1,439 posts, read 739,408 times
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It just looks incorrect to me.
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Old 02-21-2014, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
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I guess those in charge don't believe in Piaget's stages of development anymore.
Looks like we're going to skip the concrete stage and go right to the abstract.

Just wait til those students get to adding fractions.
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Old 02-21-2014, 05:27 AM
 
20,797 posts, read 36,343,628 times
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I don't see the issue IF the kids had been working concepts like that. To toss it out in a random assignment is a different story. Our kids did a lot of abstract thinking work in 1st grade, but they had examples in class so they knew the kinds of things to look for...which may or may not defeat the purpose .
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Old 02-21-2014, 06:14 AM
 
10,534 posts, read 12,878,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Question from Pearson's FIRST grade math book, designed to be aligned with the core content.



How is this remotely developmentally appropriate? To answer it, a person must be capable of abstract reasoning, something a lot of middle school students can't even do.
What is the right answer? I realize there are 14 toys in total, but none of the choices given seem to be the best way to represent the total number of toys. If you have 8 in the chest and 6 in the box I would say the correct mathematical expression is 8+6=14. However, the only choice that adds up to 14 is 10+4. How does that work?

I agree that this type of problem is developmentally inappropriate for 6 year olds. However, I don't even understand what the right answer is and I completed math through differential equations.
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