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Old 05-28-2014, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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We've discussed this here several times. Parents of college bound kids should not put their own financial security in retirement on the line to pay for their kids' education but I think, IF THEY CAN they should help. This is an interesting piece on this topic.

Is college the answer to income inequality? | MSNBC
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Old 05-28-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Whether or not parents can afford to provide financial assistance isn't really the same discussion as whether or not obtaining a degree is "worth it."
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Old 05-29-2014, 05:26 AM
 
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Interesting article. I think the most important statement is:

"The benefits of a college education have never been greater. But only in comparison to the people who lack one"

I think that much of the discussion about college not being worth it centers around the fact that recent college graduates are not doing as well as college graduates from prior generations. However, if you compare the earnings/job security of those with a degree to those without a degree it is clear that college is certainly worth it. Since people cannot go back in time to 1990 they cannot say that a college degree isn't worth it because they cant do as well as their parents did. They have to look at the world they actually live in and see that college graduates have an unemployment rate 64% lower than that of high school graduates and average earnings that are 71% higher. Clearly it is worth it to have a college degree even if the premium for having one is smaller than it used to be.
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Old 05-29-2014, 05:29 AM
 
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college is worth it if you pick a major that gives you a higher chance of finding a job, like a nurse, doctor, lawyer, etc.. a lot of medical things have part of your collage as clinicals..and increase you job and salary..
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Old 05-29-2014, 09:34 AM
 
413 posts, read 552,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Dragon View Post
college is worth it if you pick a major that gives you a higher chance of finding a job, like a nurse, doctor, lawyer, etc.. a lot of medical things have part of your collage as clinicals..and increase you job and salary..
But all college students cannot pick the same majors/career paths. You still have to find a niche even in a growing profession. A student cannot look at their career as something that is needed now, but something that will be needed 4+ years from now.
College is still worth it you just have to be smart about it.
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Old 05-29-2014, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
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I'm starting to think that if the young person isn't already motivated to become a/an "X" and it's realistic for him/her to become (name of career or trade), then several adults (parents, relatives, teacher, employers, etc) might be consulted and a decision made from that input.

In most cases, youngsters will have to undergo further training after high school. The question now is what is the best fit for the young person's skill sets vs. his/her chances of making enough money to be independent. Given the immaturity of many youngsters, their desires may or may not be able to be taken into account.

Four-year degree programs are highly expensive and any worth pursuing require a high degree of motivation. I'd rather support a young person in an 18-month certificate program at the community college in something employable, let him or her go do that work, and then see what happens. In the case of something like a CNA, some will like it enough to want to start pursing higher nursing degrees. Others may hate it and want to go into something like accounting. In the meantime, they are earning money, not sleeping away the day in their parent's house.

So, yes, college is worth it if there is a specific, realistic goal in mind. Otherwise, it might be more economically prudent to pursue another course of training.

Added: and the same applies to older people returning to college or going for the first time -- if there is a clear, realistic goal that only that training will prepare the person to do the job (or advance in a career) (for example, getting a CPA), then it's worth it.
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Old 05-29-2014, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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but in reality how many 17 or 18 year old know what they want to be "when they grow up"? To ask somebody that age to lock in a career choice does not seem wise to me and would keep many talented folks away from potential awakenings once they have a chance to see what college is all about. I know not many of us can afford to send a kid to college to "find himself" but there ought to be some interim program or project to give them a chance to grow up and develop some interests. military service used to serve that purpose and for many young men I guess it still does but given the current atmosphere I would never encourage my daughters to join the military.
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Old 05-29-2014, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Ohio
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Im a SAHM so going to college would not have been worth it, though I did try.
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Old 05-29-2014, 11:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Dragon View Post
college is worth it if you pick a major that gives you a higher chance of finding a job, like a nurse, doctor, lawyer, etc...
Not really. Statistically any degree beats no degree. In this economy, you even need the degree to get the jobs HS only gradutes used to get. Even if the degree is in basket weaving.

Getting the degree is not the issue in terms of worthiness. If you want to work full time and you don't want to earn a trade certification or risk starting your own business, being a college graduate is the way to go. Period.

What you are talking about affects how much debt you should go into to get that degree IMO. They higher the likely payout, the more debt you can consider (within reason of course).
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Old 05-29-2014, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,029 posts, read 1,154,809 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohky0815 View Post
Im a SAHM so going to college would not have been worth it, though I did try.
I disagree that being a SAHM means college isn't worth it.

I knew one SAHM who had a master's degree. She said that she wanted the assurance that if something happened to her husband (death or divorce or disability) that she would be able to get into teaching.
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