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Old 01-09-2015, 11:43 AM
 
220 posts, read 272,458 times
Reputation: 66

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
So now you want to tell the teacher how to grade her course?
And will you truly be happy if your child gets an F (60%), while the other kids' grades ARE curved?

Uhh. Yeah........because he " earned" the "D", he didn't " earn" the "A". If he didn't tell me what happened, I never would've known that he wasn't doing well and so now we can do something about it
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Old 01-09-2015, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Mount Laurel
4,146 posts, read 8,251,823 times
Reputation: 3409
He actually earned the "A". It's just that an "A" has a different meaning for this class.

This is the reason why when I am talking to my kids about school, I always want to know about their friends.

Again.. you just need to communicate with the teacher in understanding the way she run her class. If you are unsure or not in agreement with it, you go to the next level.
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Old 01-09-2015, 11:55 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,315,329 times
Reputation: 38816
Quote:
Originally Posted by sj08054 View Post
He actually earned the "A". It's just that an "A" has a different meaning for this class.
Yep.
He got the highest score.
That would make many a parent overjoyed....
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Old 01-09-2015, 12:55 PM
 
237 posts, read 425,977 times
Reputation: 242
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fancy4 View Post
I would like to talk to his teacher (this is Advanced Algebra). I do not want any future grades curved, if he doesn't honestly earn that grade. Would his teacher abide by my wishes? Because curving will not help him in the next class, if he doesn't understand what he's learning. Also a catch 22, the teacher most likely doesn't know that my son told me this, so how do I go about talking to her about it?

Thanx
I teach at the college level and there is no way that someone who isn't teaching the course or writing the test should be determining what a grade "means". The truth is, grading scales are arbitrary. Do you want me to write a test where everyone in my class gets above a 90? I can! But it sure won't help me distinguish between the students who are doing better and worse in the class. Can I write a test where no one gets above a 50%? Sure thing! In terms of actually spreading out grades and getting a nice bell curve for your grade distribution, writing an exam with a low average is much more effective than writing one with, say, an 80-85% average. The advantage of writing an exam with a low average is that you really challenge even the top students and can distinguish between their work, as opposed to having everyone near the top do roughly equal work. Why don't more people do it? Students (and apparently parents too!) misunderstand low grades and get demoralized. But you should aware that at some of the nation's top colleges and at many graduate programs low exam averages that get curved up are the norm in terms of grading.

So I think the approach you are suggesting here is a little crazy. I certainly hope that the teacher has enough sense to ignore your wishes (and severely harm your son's grades for no reason). Your son's teacher is a professional, please treat her as such.

Last edited by ytlh; 01-09-2015 at 01:08 PM..
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Old 01-09-2015, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,094 posts, read 69,382,480 times
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If he truly got a 60% and the test was curved, does the teacher plan to reteach that lesson ?
He may go into college thinking he knows this stuff when really he doesn't.
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Old 01-09-2015, 01:20 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,315,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
If he truly got a 60% and the test was curved, does the teacher plan to reteach that lesson ?
He may go into college thinking he knows this stuff when really he doesn't.
I think the student (or anybody for that matter!) is aware that he does not know "this stuff" when he gets 40% of the answers wrong...
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Old 01-09-2015, 01:37 PM
 
1,808 posts, read 1,954,369 times
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IN the education process there are often failures. We know of the failures of students. But teachers fail too, by failing to teach or by failing to test correctly. If 60 is an A then clearly there was a gross failure in the class and the curve is the response. It may not mean a failure of the student to learn the material only.
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Old 01-09-2015, 01:45 PM
 
5,394 posts, read 6,026,058 times
Reputation: 13742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fancy4 View Post
I would like to talk to his teacher (this is Advanced Algebra). I do not want any future grades curved, if he doesn't honestly earn that grade. Would his teacher abide by my wishes? Because curving will not help him in the next class, if he doesn't understand what he's learning. Also a catch 22, the teacher most likely doesn't know that my son told me this, so how do I go about talking to her about it?

Thanx
As you can see from the post below, it is in large part not about your son, nor you. Teachers are under a LOT of pressure to make sure everyone gets a "A". Dumb down the exams; give take home tests; curve the grades. Do whatever you have to so "we" can report that our school produces "well performing" students.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern Star View Post
Speaking from over 4 decades of teaching on every grade level from k - 12 , if you teach a certain concept and many of the students can't pass the test, it's the teacher's fault. They do not blame it on the students at all. It is the teacher's fault.
If you fail the number of students who actually fail, your job is on the line. You are immediately hauled into the offices of the administration and the scenario worsens from there. It does not matter what the problem is, it only matters that you push the students through and get them out of the school where they become someone else's problem.
This very thing played out several years ago on some standardized tests as well. Not only that, when city administrations change, the people on the marking teams for the math and reading tests are told exactly what grade is minimum. Since the teams of markers are paid to do the marking in the first place, they are told that if they do not follow the formula they will be immediately dismissed.
The entire system of curving grades leads directly to failure. Education needs to be taken out of the hands of business people and put back into the hands of educators.
All you need to do is look around America and you can see the results of this process. We are dumbed down to a point where critical thinking, let alone a body of knowledge, escape the majority of people. Our society is geared toward everything being a "process". Not much thinking, analysis, or critical decision making involved.

As such, the "A" students, who are really C/D students, never suffer any consequences of being ignorant. Schools "look" like they are performing well; house prices hang in there; communities are perceived as being desirable because "they have good schools". And everyone lives happily thereafter.....

Until we have to import math and engineering talent from overseas to build our products. Next time a program is on about the effort to put a man on mars, and the scientific effort behind it, look at the number of (non-US) nationalities who are doing the work.

(But we pour resources into the football team so we can brag about that...and isn't it delightful to brag about how junior is in AP classes and has a 4.7 cumm???)

Last edited by Ted Bear; 01-09-2015 at 01:59 PM..
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Old 01-09-2015, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,094 posts, read 49,267,318 times
Reputation: 66665
I once got 36/200 on an organic chem test.

It was curved to a B+. Bc there were negative points for guessing, 0/200 was not failing.

That is merely a sign of a really sh***y test.

Crappy tests should be curved if the whole class fails.

However, no curve if someone truly gets an A.
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Old 01-09-2015, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,438 posts, read 14,172,771 times
Reputation: 8782
"He may go into college thinking he knows this stuff when really he doesn't."

It's even worse than that. Under Common Core, a student begins a test. As the test progresses and the student is doing well, the test gets harder while he is taking the test. If he is doing poorly the test gets easier. No two students in the class actually takes the same test and the teacher does not know who answered which questions correctly.

It's even worse that that!. Common Core wants a certain number of students to fail the test. It is rigged because Common Core gets $30 each for the re-tests. It's a money scam and the company in Oregon is taxing your local taxpayers.
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