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Old 02-03-2015, 01:03 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 44,894,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psikeyhackr View Post
Yeah, like The Catcher in the Rye, dumb White boy keeps getting kicked out of prep school. So exciting.

Heinlein's Citizen of the Galaxy totally blows it away.

psik
I was thinking more along the lines of yawners such as Ethan Frome or A Separate Peace.

Hell, my seventh grade son hated to read. Then I introduced him to Vonnegut. So he wants to do a report on Slaughterhouse Five. His eighth grade teacher WOULDN'T LET HIM. Because it wasn't on the approved (Read: Safe) list of books.
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Old 02-03-2015, 01:47 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,118 posts, read 8,499,816 times
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I'm happy to report being pleased with the way our schools teach reading in the early and middle grades. My kids' teachers were incredibly creative in encouraging reading, particularly in middle school. It went way beyond DEAR. I had my youngest pegged as a reluctant reader, but his sixth and seventh grade teachers worked a miracle. They assigned the classics, for sure, but it was how they approached independent reading that really lit a fire in him for books. I wish all kids were so lucky. BTW, he doesn't care for science fiction, so they're not necessarily the key for all middle school boys.
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Old 02-03-2015, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
10,812 posts, read 11,270,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bishwhat View Post
I'm not gonna sit down and read a thick book. There's nothing in the world that interests me enough to sit down for long periods of time and read endless pages about it.

I'll read long news articles that get my attention but that's about it. I physically can't sit still for long enough to read an entire book. I've tried audio books as well, but it's the same thing.

People say I have ADHD, which may be the case, but I don't personally feel at a disadvantage simply because I can't read books.
It's unlikely you have ADHD, though you may suffer from some form of ADD. It's more likely you have just never learned the trick of reading big books. Those of us who read a lot don't read straight through. Instead, we read for a while and put it down. The nice thing about a book is that it is right there waiting for you, even if it takes a week to get back to it.

I'm a serious reader, and read some pretty dense stuff, not just fiction. The more difficult the material, the quicker reading fatigue sets in. I often put a book down and take a nap, because that is how I learn and retain information. Sometimes I will put a book down and do something physically active, for the same reason. A third technique is to read something and then discuss it with someone who knows the material. This is why the classic collegiate reading, lecture and recitation pattern works so well.

In any case, don't try to absorb a huge book at one sitting. Your brain will choke on it. The exception might be an absorbing story, which I think of as light reading. There are many topics that require reading multiple books and articles, watching videos, and consulting experts to master. If you plug away at it part time for 2 or 3 years, you will be astonished at how much you can learn.
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Old 02-03-2015, 03:50 PM
 
3,447 posts, read 1,663,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
It's unlikely you have ADHD, though you may suffer from some form of ADD. It's more likely you have just never learned the trick of reading big books. Those of us who read a lot don't read straight through. Instead, we read for a while and put it down. The nice thing about a book is that it is right there waiting for you, even if it takes a week to get back to it.

I'm a serious reader, and read some pretty dense stuff, not just fiction. The more difficult the material, the quicker reading fatigue sets in. I often put a book down and take a nap, because that is how I learn and retain information. Sometimes I will put a book down and do something physically active, for the same reason. A third technique is to read something and then discuss it with someone who knows the material. This is why the classic collegiate reading, lecture and recitation pattern works so well.

In any case, don't try to absorb a huge book at one sitting. Your brain will choke on it. The exception might be an absorbing story, which I think of as light reading. There are many topics that require reading multiple books and articles, watching videos, and consulting experts to master. If you plug away at it part time for 2 or 3 years, you will be astonished at how much you can learn.
Bookmarks have been around an awful long time. I second your advice, and I think it equally applies to fiction--at least, to more advanced fiction.
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Old 02-03-2015, 04:12 PM
 
Location: SC
8,298 posts, read 4,897,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustmaker View Post
What kind of friends do you have that they think they can bother you with all of their minor computer problems again and again??

Good thing you aren't a pediatrician or any type of MD and your friends had children as opposed to computers.
It is a common thing actually. I am a do-it-your-self-er. I have a large library of reference books and I am constantly learning what I need to know. When I have a problem with anything, I research and figure it out myself. Doesn't matter if it is cars, boats, computers, investing, or any other subject. People I know, know this about me.

I don't mind someone asking for help every once in a while because they are ignorant of a subject. I will give them the help they ask for if I can. But as I indicated, I will also point out what information they are lacking and tell them where to get it. Once I give them helpful direction, if they refuse to avail themselves of that helpful information, then I don't care to spend a lot of my time helping any longer.

But let me say this too...

Through this thread, you and others are only exposed to one of the many dimensions of my friendship with these and other people. And although this aspect may be frustrating, there are other things that I value in my friends.
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
4,551 posts, read 5,734,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Darned if I know. All I can really tell you is this. I *think* I am what would be described as a "heavy-duty" reader. I shocked my parents when they learned in 7th grade that I was already reading at a college level. I don't think there has ever been a time in the last fifteen years that I haven't been in the middle of reading some book or another simply for recreation.

I can't really explain it. It just came naturally. I had a thirst to learn things and I knew I could learn by reading books. When I was 14, I checked out a 600 page book on the Battle of Stalingrad in World War II from the local library. Weird kid huh?

Some poor souls suffer from learning disabilities that turns reading into a huge chore for them.

Others just simply don't enjoy reading or books because its too inactive for them.

I knew one guy who believed any extensive reading was totally unnecessary and a waste of time. He read the James Bond story "Gold Finger" and told me that everything you needed to know about life and human nature could be found in that one book.

I think one key to getting people to read is to find books that deal with subject matter they are interested in. It doesn't matter if its a murder mystery or a love story to start out. Use those books to get them to read and then try and get them to read things of more importance. Some people might respond to "how to" books. Others would respond to "self-help" and "pop-psychology". I've always felt that kind of reading was beneath me, but honestly--for someone who doesn't read--any book is a good book.

Its a great challenge. At the end of the day, though, many will choose not to read, despite everything you do to encourage it.
My experience was somewhat similar and I agree with your suggestions on getting people to read.

I started reading anything I could get my hands on in elementary school. The teacher would give an assignment and I would finish before my classmates. Out of boredom, I would read any available books. I remember reading a biography of Hitler when I was in 3rd grade. I was soon reading enclyclopedias because there was nothing else available

The summer before 4th grade (1964), I remember reading all of the newspaper articles about the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. Around this time, my mother bought a Hardy Boys book for me. I eventually read most of the books in that series.

My elementary school didn"t even have a library until 4th or 5th grade. The library that was created was basically an oversized closet that they managed to fill with books for kindergarten through 6th grade. I started going to a local community library between 6th and 7th grade. After reading the Hardy Boys, I moved to books on sports and science fiction. My problem was I never had anyone to recommend other books and I was afraid to leave the room where the young adult books were located. I was the only reader in my extended family and we had very few books in my home.

I think reading came natural to me and since I read everything I could find, it kept getting easier at a young age. For some people, reading never gets to be easy and something they do for pleasure. I disagree with some of the posters who blame the schools for kids dislike of reading. Schools do so much more today to encourage reading then when I was in school in the 1960s. We can argue about certain classics being boring but there are so many more and better books that have been published in the past 40 years. The key is to encourage kids to read and finish something that interests them. Schools are doing this but it is a difficult task since how do you force someone to read when there are so many other distractions, especially their cell phone.

I have noticed an overreliance on videos in English class. I've seen too many English classes spend much of their class time watching the movie version instead of actually reading the book. I think it is OK to supplement the book but not replace all of the reading.

Quote:
Originally Posted by psikeyhackr View Post
Yeah, like The Catcher in the Rye, dumb White boy keeps getting kicked out of prep school. So exciting.

Heinlein's Citizen of the Galaxy totally blows it away.

psik
Yes, I agree with The Catcher in the Rye. There is so much praise for this book and I'm forcing myself to finish it. I'll add The Great Gatsby to the list. I don't like the book or any of the movie versions.
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Old 02-05-2015, 11:17 AM
 
5,411 posts, read 4,234,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blktoptrvl View Post
This is partially a rant, but also an honest question. How do you get people to learn to help themselves?

There are many discussions here on CD about what makes people smart or dumb; successful or failures. Usually people try to relate this question to the all encompassing CD catch alls of "liberal or conservative", the equally condescending "rich or poor", and who can forget the other CD favorite "Black or White." I think it crosses all these classes and comes down to one thing. Those who read vs. those who do not.

As a person in the community who is known to be a computer professional, I get calls from friends (and friends of friends) who ask for help solving some problem on their computer. Most of the time it should be a simple 5 minute Q&A and they should be on their way. For Example, trying to get someone to do a print screen, paste it to paint, and send it to me. More and more, I find that it takes hours for me to explain these simple things because they don't know what "print screen means", they don't know how to paste into a document, and they don't know how to save to another folder - or find the saved file from the mail attachment dialog. I usually have to give in and go fix the problem for them, or send them to the local geek squad if they are located too far away.

I tell most of these folks that the problems they are having are happening because they do not know how to use their computer and that they need to take time to learn them better. I suggest that they go get a copy of "Windows for Dummies" or the "Idiots guide to Window." (This really extends to almost any subject and not just computers.) "Read the book, and if there is anything you don't understand call me and I will explain it to you."

I tell them that they would be able to solve their problems on their own - or that it would just take a few minutes on the phone for me to explain things if they would just learn the basics -- if they just get and read these books. But A few months later, they will call again with the same or a similar problem. When I ask them if they got a copy of the book I suggested, "what book" is usually the answer. This will repeat over and over until either they get frustrated with me telling them to read, or I tell them "Sorry, I can't help you with that."

I find this to be the same for many of my friends and it does not really matter what their background is. And it really doesn't matter if we are talking about computers, cars, home repair, woodworking, or gardening.

What is it that makes it so difficult or undesirable for people to get a book and read. I know that many people would rather just ask someone else to fix their problems for them, but how do we get more Americans to just read?
  • Do we need a PSA, that says "Most of the solutions to your problems are in a book?"
  • Instead of just teaching reading and math, should we have kids spend a lot of time in a class devoted simply to RESEARCH?
How do you get people to read?
What you need to do is concentrate on what talents these people have. Maybe they don't like messing with their computer, but are a genius at sewing or gardening or XYZ.

There might be something that you/I can't do that would irritate them.
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Old 02-05-2015, 11:25 AM
 
5,411 posts, read 4,234,805 times
Reputation: 10493
Quote:
Originally Posted by RegalSin View Post
1. You will only read if have want to read it. 2. Reason why jocks do not wear glasses is because they do not read workout. They are shown the workout. 3. Reason why computer people and writers have glasses is because they damaged their eyes reading. 4. While reading is good for information it also damages the eyes to force the user to see the context. With computers we can zoom in ( or even nowadays have the words read to us ). 5. If I had the money I would just give it to somebody who reads over me and my dumb self.
I found that out about computers messing with your eyes after I had to renew my driver's license. I had not been able to pass the vision test for years. Well, after being retired 8 years - I PASSED! No glasses required!

The lady said that all those years of NOT looking at a computer screen helped.
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Old 02-05-2015, 03:53 PM
 
12,429 posts, read 26,881,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
I found that out about computers messing with your eyes after I had to renew my driver's license. I had not been able to pass the vision test for years. Well, after being retired 8 years - I PASSED! No glasses required!

The lady said that all those years of NOT looking at a computer screen helped.
^^ That's your reference for computers messing up your vision?

You can certainly get eyestrain from staring at computer screen for too long, but it's not going to affect your vision. Eye Fatigue: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:19 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
8,777 posts, read 4,709,424 times
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When I was in early grade school, some of the educational films we saw had Jiminy Cricket hosting a subject. It would open up and very soon, Mr. Cricket would talk about where he learns about things, by reading books, and the camera would pan by his bookshelf, where among others, there was always the book, "Where Teachers Get Their Answers".

Okay, for me, that was back in the 60's and I would imagine, the educational flicks for the young have changed since then. Given this subject, however, I have to wonder if such suggestions about reading have been removed from the way we teach?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
More and more information these days can only be found on videos. New gadgets these days no longer come with an instruction booklet, but with a built in video or instructions to go to a website.......
Which gadgets are these? My DVD/VHS deck has a book in several languages as does my dive computer. My 35mm slide to digital unit came with an instruction book.

Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
........I can't really explain it. It just came naturally. I had a thirst to learn things and I knew I could learn by reading books. When I was 14, I checked out a 600 page book on the Battle of Stalingrad in World War II from the local library. Weird kid huh?
.......
Wouldn't surprise me if we have the same book.

A bargain buy book I picked up, "Into the Minds of Madmen" http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...4,203,200_.jpg
is rather so dull, I can understand why it was on clearance.

Still, I bought it, it is an area of interest, I should read it, but I am going to regulate it to my world of extremely high speed reading, where I can go through a decent size book in about 2-3 hours. I won't be able to tell you that afternoon what I read, however, for it takes about a month or two for that ability to process what was seen into memory. The Stalingrad book mention above is on the same table to be processed as such.

Perhaps that is one reason why people don't read more because they only have one mode of reading.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandalorian View Post
Schools ruin reading for kids. Make them do boring and stressful graded stuff. The hate continues in life from age 12 until age 65.
Perhaps. Mom said that it was being made to read aloud in school that wrecked her speed reading ability.

Last edited by TamaraSavannah; 02-06-2015 at 12:38 AM..
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