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Old 03-26-2015, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Texas
41,672 posts, read 47,510,225 times
Reputation: 65307

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Three year olds don't have to be in school, but they often enjoy preschool because they get to play with other children their age. My kids went to preschool at 3 because everyone in their neighborhood was going. It was half days for 2.5 hours a day. They could go 3 or 5 days a week.

At 4, they went to half day preK 5 days a week. It isn't a *cattle call* unless the classrooms are too big. Ours were small and had more than one teacher. The kids did have some *learning* activities - story time for about 15 minutes, a few special art activities and reading and math readiness, but that was not the point of preschool for us. Note that the time allowed me to run errands without kids along (once the younger one went to preschool or with only the toddler when her brother was in preschool). They also went to the playground every day, weather permitting. And they did art activities that were messy and moms didn't have to do the clean up. It was partly for the kids and partly for the parents.
You hit the nail on the head.
Those places aren't about advantage for kids but for parents. The "learning" part is simply a feel-good sentiment as the "learning" is at the least efficient under those circumstances.

We let our kid decide when and what he wants to learn and then encourage, add to, make up games, etc, to reinforce and expand. In a matter of minutes, the concept is grasped and he will actually come to us to "play math game" (where we add and subtract blocks or stones or acorns or whatever is handy where we are) or "letters game" (where we spell words or he reads) with him.

My son has a standing Tuesday play date with one friend, plays with kids in his gymnastics class (outside of class), plays with kids at the park, made friends at swim class, and goes on random play dates...next week, we have a trip to the lake beach with one friend and a trip to the museum the next week with another friend.

Fact is kids go to 6 hours of school to learn 45 minutes worth of material and have the love of learning choked out of them while not being encouraged to develop critical thinking skills or apply what they learn to useful real life situations.

Silly.
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Old 03-26-2015, 04:06 PM
 
483 posts, read 389,083 times
Reputation: 933
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
My friends ask why we don't send our 3 year old to "school." He just turned 3.

What are they learning at school?
Oh, ABCs, numbers, shapes, etc.

He can read. He can add and subtract. He can tell you not only colors, but shades. He can tell you how many sides an octagon has. He can tell you the ingredients of a chocolate chip cookie, make you a cup of coffee, and feed the dogs.

He can name each type of construction vehicle (excavator, backhoe, backhoe loader, the difference between grader and scraper, etc) and its parts (boom, shovel, gripper, wrist, etc).
He can name pretty much any fruit or berry. He has been doing 12-16 piece puzzles for almost a year. Different dinosaurs, all the animals, and the difference between carnivores and herbivores. He does tricks on a scooter and rides a balance bike. He does various sports.

Why? Not bc he is some genius or anything. But bc 4 adults routinely take their time to educate him instead of send him off to some dumb ass cattle call.

They aren't all "cattle calls".
What about the single parents who have to have childcare? Or the parents who both work because they live in a high cost area but have low paying jobs? What about the parents who one works and the other is going back to school to finish a degree? I worked in a small childcare center and we had several families of each scenario. We also had 2 children who had some learning disorders and the support we could offer at a half day of school was specialized and was more then what the parents could do.

In addition to the academic side of childcare we took field trips, we did art, cooking, music. The kiddos had an awesome playground for outside play, water play in the summer and loads of special visitors at school(a petting zoo, a parrot lady, hands on science etc). All of it built in, and we took care of all the scheduling.

I understand that childcare doesn't work for some, but you can't just assume that the adults at home don't want to participate in the care, more then 75% of parents in our program couldn't afford to not work/attend class.

You just have to be sure to find the center that offers the best care at a price that doesn't take up a whole paycheck. No sense in paying for childcare if it takes all of one low paying salary. I will agree that that doesn't make an sense.
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Old 03-26-2015, 09:37 PM
 
7,875 posts, read 6,695,764 times
Reputation: 7448
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post

Ummm....recapping--
No need to recap.

I misread one line in that post of yours as "I never really learned any subjects that mattered [in college]." Yes, not what you stated, my mistake & apologies.

Quote:
1. My contention throughout this thread is that homeschooling is perfectly doable by most parents. College or no is irrelevant. If you're devoted to the success of your kids, you're good to go.
Yes, I know. Your contention is obvious.

Your insinuations are also loud and clear:

Quote:
My response has always been that homeschooling has far more in common with parenting than it does with teaching.
Quote:
If you don't have the patience to teach your own kids, by extension, you don't have the patience to parent them either.
Then you say:

Quote:
I mean, if one has the time, resources, temperament, desire, and knowledge to be a good parent they're already pre-qualified to homeschool.
Quote:
I mean, I agree it's highly unlikely it'll ever hit 50%, simply because it IS easier to send them to public school.
You fluff it up a little, but IMO? You're pretty crystal clear.

Quote:
5. To which I replied:
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred
You clearly have no idea what is required for an elementary ed. major.
Seriously, it has nothing to do with subject matter, no matter where you go. I mean really, are they going to teach you long division again? In college?
Your general studies teach subject matter (Bio101, WesternCiv, etc) but that's not unique to education majors. Everyone has to take generals. There's a reason they're "general" studies
Courses specific to education will be things like methods classes, differentiation, classroom management, exceptional learners, child psych, etc. and again, these things are for teaching rooms full of varied learners, not your own kids.

I clearly don’t. I’m only certified to teach K-6th in my state.

Quote:
I hope you're up to speed now.
Probably not, I wasn’t homeschooled.

Last edited by Informed Info; 03-26-2015 at 11:02 PM..
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Old 03-26-2015, 11:01 PM
 
7,875 posts, read 6,695,764 times
Reputation: 7448
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
You hit the nail on the head.
Those places aren't about advantage for kids but for parents. The "learning" part is simply a feel-good sentiment as the "learning" is at the least efficient under those circumstances.

We let our kid decide when and what he wants to learn and then encourage, add to, make up games, etc, to reinforce and expand. In a matter of minutes, the concept is grasped and he will actually come to us to "play math game" (where we add and subtract blocks or stones or acorns or whatever is handy where we are) or "letters game" (where we spell words or he reads) with him.

My son has a standing Tuesday play date with one friend, plays with kids in his gymnastics class (outside of class), plays with kids at the park, made friends at swim class, and goes on random play dates...next week, we have a trip to the lake beach with one friend and a trip to the museum the next week with another friend.

Fact is kids go to 6 hours of school to learn 45 minutes worth of material and have the love of learning choked out of them while not being encouraged to develop critical thinking skills or apply what they learn to useful real life situations.

Silly.
First and only kid?
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Old 03-27-2015, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Florida
3,345 posts, read 2,686,577 times
Reputation: 6786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustmaker View Post
First and only kid?
Eh, I have two, one teen and one preteen, and I agree. They did spend a year in a charter school last year. It was okay, but probably half of the instruction/work was actually just prepping for and taking a ton of standardized tests, to be honest. Both of my kids saw it as a waste of time and asked to come back home because learning is much more efficient here.
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Old 03-27-2015, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,005,066 times
Reputation: 2381
Sawdust, I really have no idea what you're after here.

Are you looking to be offended?
Because if so, I think you're probably WAY off base using my comments to create it...
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Old 03-27-2015, 11:17 PM
 
7,875 posts, read 6,695,764 times
Reputation: 7448
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Sawdust, I really have no idea what you're after here.

Are you looking to be offended?
Because if so, I think you're probably WAY off base using my comments to create it...
Are you purposely being obtuse?

You said what you said.
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Old 03-27-2015, 11:38 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
3,485 posts, read 2,655,790 times
Reputation: 9823
There are a lot of great homeschooling families out there.


There are also plenty of people who shouldn't be homeschooling (some who currently aren't, some who currently are). Even if one allows that a homeschooling parent doesn't need broad content knowledge, they do at the bare minimum need to know how to read well.



Quote:
The U.S. Dеpartment of Education, Institute of Education Sciences has conducted large scale assessment of adult proficiency in 1992 and 2003 using a common methodology from which trends could be measured. The study measures Prose, Document, and Quantitative skills and 19,000 subjects participated in the 2003 survey. There was no significant change in Prose or Document skills and a slight increase in Quantitative attributes. As in 2008, roughly 15% of the sample could function at the highest levels in all three categories. Roughly 50% were at either basic or below basic levels of proficiency in all three categories.

[...]

The study, the most comprehensive study of literacy ever commissioned by the U.S. government, was released in April 2002 and reapplied in 2003 giving trend data. It involved lengthy interviews of over 90,700 adults statistically balanced for age, gender, ethnicity, education level, and location (urban, suburban, or rural) in 12 states across the U.S. and was designed to represent the U.S. population as a whole. This government study showed that 21% to 23% of adult Americans were not "able to locate information in text", could not "make low-level inferences using printed materials", and were unable to "integrate easily identifiable pieces of information."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literac..._United_States
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Old 03-27-2015, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,005,066 times
Reputation: 2381
Generally speaking, these aren't the people who are homeschooling though. Or, if they are, they've figured out how to compensate. Because the fact still remains that, despite education or lack of of the parents, homeschoolers are more successful academically than their more typically schooled peers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustmaker View Post
Are you purposely being obtuse?

You said what you said.

Ummm. OK

I did indeed say what I said lol

Last edited by itsMeFred; 03-28-2015 at 12:11 AM..
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Texas
41,672 posts, read 47,510,225 times
Reputation: 65307
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustmaker View Post
First and only kid?
First.
Not only.
BTW, just got a text that he scored back to back goals at his soccer game right now.
I am missing it bc at conference.
Then he is going to his grandfather's house to bake a cake.
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