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Old 04-04-2015, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,128,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Because the unsuccessful homeschoolers return to the public school and are counted against the public schools when the stats come out.

Also, we don't know the real stats on homeschooled kids because there are plenty who don't ever get tested and certainly some who never go on to college or to a successful career. The ones we hear about are the successful ones, but that does not mean there are not others.

I do have anecdotes about some of those, but I can't really post about individual kids.
Indeed. OTOH, my homeschooled kids have gone on to public high school, and will be counted as school successes (S is in line for val/sal) despite the fact that public school is not responsible for their work ethic, their sense of honor, their intellectual curiosity-- or for simple things like teaching them negative numbers or the capital and chief industry of Luxembourg.

And I daresay I could match your anecdotes with a number of my own-- if only the plural of anecote were data!
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Old 04-04-2015, 03:36 PM
 
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I imagine many people need the mental break from their role as a parent for at least a couple hours a day. It's easy to get burnt out when the responsibility is on you 24/7. (Ask me how I know!!)

The other thing is, I would gladly send my kids to school if we had one around here that was a good fit for them. They have special learning needs that don't fit easily into the public school classroom, nor the one private school option we have here. They went to a Montessori kindy which we loved. If they were more traditional learners, I would be happy to send them to school. We live in an area with good schools, so I don't really wonder why the parents here tend to send their kids. Most of the kids in our HS groups come from surrounding towns which don't have the same schools we do.
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Old 04-04-2015, 10:47 PM
 
8,064 posts, read 7,054,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Generally speaking, these aren't the people who are homeschooling though. Or, if they are, they've figured out how to compensate. Because the fact still remains that, despite education or lack of of the parents, homeschoolers are more successful academically than their more typically schooled peers.




Ummm. OK

I did indeed say what I said lol
Why do you insist on being so coy?

What you said spoke volumes about what you really think of parents who don't homeschool. No matter how involved they are.

There are no definitive facts or studies that state, let alone prove, homeschooled kids are more successful at anything than their "more typically schooled peers" from the same background/income level, etc.

Parents who care about their kids & the education their kids receive will always have kids who do well - no matter what environment they are schooled in.
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:01 PM
 
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I think most homeschool because of the environment at schools and the poor results a so many. From grade school to college schools are no longer the places they use to be especially the safety factor.
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Old 04-05-2015, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
9,624 posts, read 5,155,085 times
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No, I don't really wonder why more people don't home-school. Home-schooling can be expensive and takes a serious commitment (both time and money-wise). Many parents just can't do it. Not to mention many parents whose children could benefit from a solid home-school don't have the educational attainment necessary to serve as effective home instructors. Most of my siblings and I were home-schooled and we are all better for it, IMO. But, then again, our home-school instructor (our mother) really knew her stuff. We were only home-schooled up until high school, which we all excelled at, qualifying for honors and AP courses. Post high school, we were all college bound, being accepted to and/or attending Ivy League schools and schools of similar caliber like Georgetown, the University of Chicago, etc. Our parents made sure that we were kept up to the standard and we, through an agreement with the local education board, took all of the city and state-wide exams, performing very well on them.

On the other hand, and going back to my point about whether one's parent/custodian is capable of home-schooling (of course, there are other home-schooling relationships, but I'm just referring to the most common, which, from my experience, seems to involve a parent(s) as instructor), we have a family friend who was and is a complete disaster as a home-school instructor. She was and is completely incapable of effectively home-schooling her children. Even with the problems with the public school system where I am, her children would have been far better off attending public schools from the beginning. Thus, now the family friend's youngest two daughters (one is 19, the other is 21) cannot perform basic reading, writing, and math tasks (I kid you not, its really sad). The family friend's youngest child, who is turning 14 this year, can barely read and is terrible at math (he still has to add on his fingers when doing basic math). There is nothing "wrong" with these children . . . they just were never properly taught.

Last edited by prospectheightsresident; 04-05-2015 at 03:22 PM..
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Old 04-05-2015, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Florida
3,893 posts, read 2,982,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustmaker View Post

Parents who care about their kids & the education their kids receive will always have kids who do well - no matter what environment they are schooled in.
I tend to agree with this statement, generally speaking. This is probably why homeschooled kids tend to do well; by their very nature, their parents are involved and care about their children's education. The majority of these kids would probably do fine in a public school program, if that was what their parents chose.

On the other hand, if a school environment is really just not working for a particular kid, then he or she is not likely to do very well. The classroom is full of distractions, and the instruction is geared toward where most of the kids are. For those who are easily distracted or who learn more quickly or more slowly than the majority of the kids, things can be very difficult, even with a lot of parental involvement and concern.
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Old 04-05-2015, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
9,624 posts, read 5,155,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustmaker View Post
Parents who care about their kids & the education their kids receive will always have kids who do well - no matter what environment they are schooled in.
I don't know how true that is. Yes, I see where you're coming from, but some parents simply don't have a feasible way out. They are themselves the fruit of a cycle of poor schooling and parenting and, so, wouldn't serve as effective home-school instructors, let alone effective parents. Additionally, due to this cycle, many of them do not earn enough (as they are not educated/formally skilled enough) to move/send their children to better-performing schools. And its even harder on some parents vs. others as many parents who find themselves in these unfortunate situations are single parents.
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Old 04-05-2015, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,137,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustmaker View Post
Why do you insist on being so coy?

What you said spoke volumes about what you really think of parents who don't homeschool. No matter how involved they are.

There are no definitive facts or studies that state, let alone prove, homeschooled kids are more successful at anything than their "more typically schooled peers" from the same background/income level, etc.
Actually, there are. If you're genuinely interested, a few minutes with google will find them easily.
(Frankly, I don't think you actually want your assumptions challenged though, which is why I'm not interested in doing your research for you)

And I have no complaints whatsoever with parents who don't homeschool. I AM one.
You did manage to catch that already, right?
I'm also a public school teacher and enjoy my job. But you've picked up on that already, too, yes?
I've been pretty forthcoming for someone who is "coy."
Or maybe you just don't read very well...

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherTouchOfWhimsy View Post
.On the other hand, if a school environment is really just not working for a particular kid, then he or she is not likely to do very well. The classroom is full of distractions, and the instruction is geared toward where most of the kids are. For those who are easily distracted or who learn more quickly or more slowly than the majority of the kids, things can be very difficult, even with a lot of parental involvement and concern.
I agree. And of course that's why it's not terribly unusual to find kids who are doing each, within the same family.

Last edited by itsMeFred; 04-05-2015 at 09:10 PM..
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Old 04-05-2015, 10:31 PM
 
8,064 posts, read 7,054,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Actually, there are. If you're genuinely interested, a few minutes with google will find them easily.
(Frankly, I don't think you actually want your assumptions challenged though, which is why I'm not interested in doing your research for you)

And I have no complaints whatsoever with parents who don't homeschool. I AM one.
You did manage to catch that already, right?
I'm also a public school teacher and enjoy my job. But you've picked up on that already, too, yes?
I've been pretty forthcoming for someone who is "coy."
Or maybe you just don't read very well...


I agree. And of course that's why it's not terribly unusual to find kids who are doing each, within the same family.
Why don't you ever actually address a point as opposed to replying with snark and without a point?

I know you are a public school teacher - this is why my kids go to private as opposed to public schools….no need for them to ever have to deal with teachers who can't follow along/deflect when challenged/make things up to prove themselves smarter than everyone else in the room. And still keep their job.


Last edited by Informed Info; 04-05-2015 at 10:41 PM..
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Old 04-06-2015, 05:04 PM
 
891 posts, read 546,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuck's Dad View Post
I think you are misrepresenting the vast majority of home schoolers (and I agree they are a significant minority) with this statement. Most choose homeschooling because for a wide variety of reasons the public school system in their area did not meet the needs of their kids. If we lived in a middle or upper middle class suburb of a major metropolitan area, with a well funded high performing school district (and there are a fair number that meet the criteria), there would only be a few unique situations where parents would opt to home school. However, most start the home school journey with a lot of fear and trepidation, not religious zealotry, and usually it is a last resort to solve a particular need for the kid, or a systemic failure in the particular school that has an adverse (and somewhat significant) impact the the children that the parents opt to home school.

Food for thought from your quote "...its another to belittle other tried, tested and proven methods of education." So how do you account for the academic hostility in the education schools/departments to phonics and other tried and true teaching methodologies that work exceptionally well?

Why did Education Departments (with a focus almost exclusively on pedigogy) replace the traditional liberal arts degree with an education minor for teaching qualification? We lost subject matter experts and replaced them with pedigogical experts with limited expertise in their actual feild.

I think the issue is not that homeschoolers are "belittling tried and true education methods," they are more often than not reacting to the wholesale abandonment of those tried and true methodologies in many school districts across the nation.



I think that is why you are seeing significant increases in home schooling, but for a variety of reasons, I think it will remain a minority movement (numbers, not race) rather than at some point morphing to a mainstream standard option.

And while I've seen some snark in a few posts, it is hardly a "snarky" thread, and most of the posts have been well reasoned and rather pedestrian IMO. Not sure where the comment "Screaming at the the top of ones lungs about how much better it is.... " comes from based on the posts I've read. Is there an outside event or group that has you feeling this way, or did I misread/misunderstand some of the posts in the thread? Sincere question, because the debate has been relatively open in the thread IMO.



This is an odd comment, that is at once saying homeschooling is a valid option, and in a left handed way, insulting homeschoolers, while playing the victim card for public school parents being unfairly judged, while you are actually casting a negative judgement about homeschoolers. This is one of the more convoluted statements I've read on the thread.

If there's anything i try not to do is double speak. I go out if my way not to. Now when writing certain things may get lost in translation or misconstrued.

Make no mistake, I have no issues with homeschooling, it is something i considered doing and decided against. I have no issues with the idea, just the execution. I have no issue with private or public schooling ideas either. I have issues with with their cost and execution respectively. I have no issues with families that homeschool... i have issues with some of their reasons for doing so... But to each his own. One size does not fit all. Everyone picks whats best for their kids and family and hopes for the best.

What i dont get is why some of you feel the need to amplify what you are doing... Like its somehow better or superior to other peoples choices... Some have blatantly equated not making the same choice to inferior parenting. Call a spade a spade. Bucking the trend comes with a feeling of pride over being different or enlightened or having knowledge others do not posses. I get it...But lets not kid ourselves, it does not a better parent make.

I think homeschooling is the best choice for many families. But that does not make it the best choice for ALL families neither has it proven itself to be. That is ALL im saying.( while calling out some extremos on this topic)

Last edited by BLDSoon; 04-06-2015 at 05:25 PM..
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