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Old 05-18-2015, 09:39 AM
 
14,982 posts, read 16,053,265 times
Reputation: 14563

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
Speaking of which, I think all students should have IEPs in place. We should have education teams whose sole job is to meet with parents and teachers through out the school year to ascertain each student's academic career is on track. These teams could be central to a tracking based system as well. Alluding to my previous post, there could be a "safety" in the tracking system whereby students who show promise and work ethic could be moved to a higher track, if they so choose.
My experience (anecdotal, I know) with this is that kids are almost never moved to a higher track although some kids are moved to lower tracks. We had a girl scout who really wanted to take advanced English, but the counselors and teachers were totally against it. She was bright, but was a black student and I was amazed at the racist supposition that she could not succeed (and this was in a diverse school). She requested and requested and they finally let her take the class and she did quite well.
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Old 05-18-2015, 11:55 AM
 
5,791 posts, read 4,336,253 times
Reputation: 7771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Back to the 50s! Seriously, this has not been the case in the US for decades.
Yep, in the 19th century there were eight learned professions. Doctor, lawyer, clergyman, architect, dentist, accountant, and I forget what the other two were. Everyone else went into business, farming, or the trades. I guess we could go back to that system but it's hard for me to see how - when a factory is run by a few engineers and cars drive themselves.
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Old 05-18-2015, 12:02 PM
 
Location: The analog world
13,030 posts, read 7,639,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
My experience (anecdotal, I know) with this is that kids are almost never moved to a higher track although some kids are moved to lower tracks.
I've had it done twice: once in elementary math at the school's initiative, and once in middle school language arts at my request.
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Old 05-18-2015, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Middle America
34,642 posts, read 37,038,726 times
Reputation: 46001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
Speaking of which, I think all students should have IEPs in place. We should have education teams whose sole job is to meet with parents and teachers through out the school year to ascertain each student's academic career is on track. These teams could be central to a tracking based system as well. Alluding to my previous post, there could be a "safety" in the tracking system whereby students who show promise and work ethic could be moved to a higher track, if they so choose.
Apart from the number of IEP case managers you'd need to employ to keep on top of this extremely exhaustive and highly specific legal paperwork (I used to manage an obscene caseload working in a special needs school, I know how long a single, solid, IEP takes to collaborate on produce, meet on, finalize, revisit, amend, etc. when the legal order of things is appropriately followed), I agree with the sentiment that more individualized attention is more beneficial. But realistically, you'd need a literal army to handle the paperwork alone, and more hours in a day, days in a week, and weeks in a year to hold all the legally required meetings to draft and redraft each plan. And, really, the team would have that as their full job. I don't have any idea when any instruction, let alone the planning for it, would get done around the byzantine maze of bureaucracy/red tape that is IEP paperwork if it were in place for every student.
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Old 05-18-2015, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Powers/Dublin
212 posts, read 616,054 times
Reputation: 117
I do not work in the schools or districts, so I don't see that side. I am a parent with kids in school.

1. I really don't think there should be homework. It's just too much. I don't have the time in the evenings to figure out the homework to help with it. I have no idea how the teacher has taught the lesson for the homework. It's frustrating!

2. I like how the schools are moving to technology based instructions, keep that going, improve it, assignments on ipads, video lectures, books on ipad, etc.

3. Having a student with a disability and IEP, I can see that it's still very difficult to keep teachers following this. They seem to hate that my child gets assigned, graded, differently. I don't like feeling this way. It's not his fault that he learns differently, takes longer to understand, is dyslexic. He wants to learn, but some teachers don't want to teach my child because he's not the same as the others. Something needs to change with IEPs and Common Core.
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Old 05-18-2015, 01:42 PM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,227,108 times
Reputation: 4326
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie1215 View Post
What changes would you make if you could?
1. Everyone will learn the same things regardless of location, income and demographics.
2. I'll have the Gov pay for everything these kids need & stop wasting tax dollars on their salaries and overseas wars!
3. Every kid enrolled will wear the same uniform in every state.


It's called "The "United" States, but at street level were anything but "United".
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Old 05-18-2015, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Middle America
34,642 posts, read 37,038,726 times
Reputation: 46001
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristie73 View Post
I do not work in the schools or districts, so I don't see that side. I am a parent with kids in school.

1. I really don't think there should be homework.
Independent practice is essential to mastery. There is some time in class for a small degree of independent practice, but not enough.

Quote:
2. I like how the schools are moving to technology based instructions, keep that going, improve it, assignments on ipads, video lectures, books on ipad, etc.
There is quality instruction making solid use of technology, and there are instructors who use technology terribly, and learning opportunities are fewer and further between.

Having tech alone does not guarantee that it is being used appropriately, or to its fullest, most beneficial extent. It's also best when used as a tool, not a sole means of instruction, or as a means for an instructor to simply become a proctor and data assembler.

Quote:
3. Having a student with a disability and IEP, I can see that it's still very difficult to keep teachers following this. They seem to hate that my child gets assigned, graded, differently. I don't like feeling this way. It's not his fault that he learns differently, takes longer to understand, is dyslexic. He wants to learn, but some teachers don't want to teach my child because he's not the same as the others. Something needs to change with IEPs and Common Core.
What do you think needs to change with IEPs? As a special education teacher with a lot of experience and knowledge of the ins and outs of IEP legalities, I'm genuinely curious to know. Is it the IEP format you wish to change or is it regular ed teachers' reactions and attitudes toward being legally obligated to follow the provisions of an IEP?
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Old 05-18-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Middle America
34,642 posts, read 37,038,726 times
Reputation: 46001
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
1. Everyone will learn the same things regardless of location, income and demographics.
What about according to ability? A student with cerebral palsy and traumatic brain injury, for instance, may not learn all the same things as a nondisabled student.
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Old 05-18-2015, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Powers/Dublin
212 posts, read 616,054 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Independent practice is essential to mastery. There is some time in class for a small degree of independent practice, but not enough.



There is quality instruction making solid use of technology, and there are instructors who use technology terribly, and learning opportunities are fewer and further between.

Having tech alone does not guarantee that it is being used appropriately, or to its fullest, most beneficial extent. It's also best when used as a tool, not a sole means of instruction, or as a means for an instructor to simply become a proctor and data assembler.



What do you think needs to change with IEPs? As a special education teacher with a lot of experience and knowledge of the ins and outs of IEP legalities, I'm genuinely curious to know. Is it the IEP format you wish to change or is it regular ed teachers' reactions and attitudes toward being legally obligated to follow the provisions of an IEP?
1. Some homework I think would be fine, finishing up an assignment not completed in class, studying for tests, but if the student is clueless on what to do in the homework, then it's not good. How does the parent know how to help? Homework should be for practice of concepts learned, but how does the teacher know the student has learned the concept before assigning the homework? It's also knowing the expectation of the homework.

2. I agree, ipads, laptops, technology is important and a great tool to be included in the education. I think some recorded lectures are helpful. It's getting better. Learn more about note taking, recording assignments, turning in work. All material in one place. Include the parents.

3. I feel like teachers look at IEP's as a pain, maybe they don't even read them for each student. Or they don't believe the student needs one. They have the same expectations for all students. Parents rely on Special Ed to help formulate the IEP and enforce it but it only works if the teachers are willing to help. I think there should be constant communication with the teachers, special ed, and the parents. I think teachers may be uneducated or at a loss on how to teach some kids. There are a lot of disabilities and not all with ADHD are the same. There is not enough teacher time to devote to the student that needs it. A lot for my child is figuring out how to organize themselves to learn, to follow the steps, the "rules" to turn in their work on time, to complete their assignments, to remember details, to understand what is being taught, etc. I don't generally feel compassion from the regular ed teachers. I don't think they understand my side or my child. My child wants to learn, but is frustrated because he can't learn how teachers are teaching it. Or they went too fast and he processes slower. Or he needs it repeated, or broken down into steps. There is a lot that these kids need from their teachers. Some teachers are willing to accommodate and understand that their needs are valid. Every kid is different and so is every teacher. I feel like I'm explaining my child's needs over and over every year. Executive Functioning is a big one that comes along with Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia, ADHD, Aspergers, Autism but I don't think teachers realize it's not laziness or them choosing not to put forth effort, it is a real disability. But they don't know how to help them cope with it in class. Kids have to learn how to cope, figure out strategies for learning, then learn the assignment. There's just a lot more than legal paperwork.
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Old 05-18-2015, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Northern NJ
6,767 posts, read 6,897,844 times
Reputation: 9824
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
1. Everyone will learn the same things regardless of location, income and demographics.
2. I'll have the Gov pay for everything these kids need & stop wasting tax dollars on their salaries and overseas wars!
3. Every kid enrolled will wear the same uniform in every state.


It's called "The "United" States, but at street level were anything but "United".
1) Preposterous, we are teaching people to think, not programming robots.

2) There is no government. You are taking money from people who earned it and own it. It is not yours to give.

3) NO UNIFORMS! Everyone is not the same, and clothes are a part of personal expression.
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