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Old 09-07-2015, 10:42 AM
 
Location: midwest
1,349 posts, read 954,168 times
Reputation: 800

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Make science interesting:

Worlds Within Worlds: The Story of Nuclear Energy, (1972)
Volumes (1,2 & 3 of 3) by Isaac Asimov
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/49819
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/49820
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/49821

Omnilingual (Feb 1957) by H. Beam Piper
Scientific Language: H. Beam Piper’s “Omnilingual” | Tor.com
Omnilingual - Henry Beam Piper | Feedbooks
http://librivox.org/omnilingual-by-h-beam-piper/

Badge of Infamy (Jun 1957) by Lester del Rey
http://librivox.org/badge-of-infamy-by-lester-del-rey/
Badge of Infamy by Lester Del Rey - Free at Loyal Books

1957 was the year of Sputnik, but it was launched in October. Both of these stories were published before the Sputnik launch. It was not until 1958 that the van Allen belts were discovered and 1965 that a probe sent to Mars discovered that the planet had no magnetic field and only one percent of Earth's atmospheric pressure. So this information changed our thinking about the chances of life developing on the planet and Mars stories from before 1965 would most likely have significant inaccuracies. But these are both decent and interesting stories nonetheless.

psik
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Old 09-07-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,736,370 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
And while they ingrain you to make sure you hit each and every tested standard they constantly say "But we don't teach to the test". The sheer hypocrisy of it all makes me want to laugh out loud.

Like if they say it enough times we'll believe it ?
I don't know about where you are but here in the great lakes state we don't hit all the standards. In fact we're encouraged not to. We're told to teach depth not breadth (which is kind of hard to do in chemistry because it's kind of like strip mining. You can't go deep until you go wide.). You see all of our standards don't make the test. The few that do are random and cannot be used to drive curriculum. Here there is no accountability for teaching the standards. It's up to each school to decide what they will teach and often up to each individual teacher. No one actually checks to see we're teaching them.

In chemistry I hit about 70% of the standards. I choose the ones that let me get to the higher level connections that I want my students to make in chemistry and the ones I know their professors will expect they have seen when they get to college and I am told I teach too much!!!! I fight teaching less because I know what kids need to go on. I have a degree in chemical engineering and I know where those who study chemistry in college are going to go. I do my best to prepare them but I get push back from administrators, parents and students.

That said I will say that I do teach to the test. I know my students will be asked to use graphical and table data to make decisions so I make sure we do that as much as we can. I know they won't be tested on particular content though so I don't worry so much about that. The way the questions are presented they will need to interpret data and I can teach that skill with many of the labs we do.
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Old 09-07-2015, 08:14 PM
 
24,760 posts, read 26,839,776 times
Reputation: 22799
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie1215 View Post
What changes would you make if you could?
The best way to change it is to abandon it completely with home schooling. It can't be saved.
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Old 09-08-2015, 08:02 AM
 
3,762 posts, read 1,678,332 times
Reputation: 5150
The best way is with school choice. Let parents pick out the school to sent the kids to; public (any public, not just the neighborhood one), private, parochial, charter, home school, anything else. As long as it meet some sort of certification. The school district or the state pays. The money goes with the student to the school he attends.
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Old 09-08-2015, 08:14 AM
 
174 posts, read 88,674 times
Reputation: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyfan View Post
The best way is with school choice. Let parents pick out the school to sent the kids to; public (any public, not just the neighborhood one), private, parochial, charter, home school, anything else. As long as it meet some sort of certification. The school district or the state pays. The money goes with the student to the school he attends.
If you're not paying for a school the next town over, you cannot go. Go to the school you OWN, or do something private on your dollar. You are just parroting hedgefunders interested in privatizing the school system. Like them, you're very obtuse and don't know what you're talking about.
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Old 09-08-2015, 09:57 AM
 
3,762 posts, read 1,678,332 times
Reputation: 5150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anchorhead1977 View Post
If you're not paying for a school the next town over, you cannot go. Go to the school you OWN, or do something private on your dollar. You are just parroting hedgefunders interested in privatizing the school system. Like them, you're very obtuse and don't know what you're talking about.
People have choice where to send their kids for college. Pell grants, aid goes with the student. There's no reason K-12 or at least 9 - 12 can't be run the same way. Aid isn't limited to public colleges. Notre Dame, Georgetown, Boston College students are just as eligible for government aid as kids at Michigan State or UCLA. And kids from Utah are perfectly free to sent their kids to Stanford. They don't have to go to BYU or Utah State.

I'm not parroting anything. My ideas are my own. Unlike many here, I do not have an vested interest in the status quo (i.e, pension, salary, benefits). Our daughter was done with school years ago. We sent her to public, private, parochial as the circumstances seemed best.

My only interest is effective education at reasonable cost. Right now we have many school systems with neither. Nothing that has been suggested by the education establishment has even marginally improved these systems. Everything they suggest is concerned first and foremost with their preserving their control and perquisites.

Until things are changed they will never change.
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Old 09-08-2015, 11:29 AM
 
174 posts, read 88,674 times
Reputation: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyfan View Post
People have choice where to send their kids for college. Pell grants, aid goes with the student. There's no reason K-12 or at least 9 - 12 can't be run the same way. Aid isn't limited to public colleges. Notre Dame, Georgetown, Boston College students are just as eligible for government aid as kids at Michigan State or UCLA. And kids from Utah are perfectly free to sent their kids to Stanford. They don't have to go to BYU or Utah State.

I'm not parroting anything. My ideas are my own. Unlike many here, I do not have an vested interest in the status quo (i.e, pension, salary, benefits). Our daughter was done with school years ago. We sent her to public, private, parochial as the circumstances seemed best.

My only interest is effective education at reasonable cost. Right now we have many school systems with neither. Nothing that has been suggested by the education establishment has even marginally improved these systems. Everything they suggest is concerned first and foremost with their preserving their control and perquisites.

Until things are changed they will never change.
No. Schools are the center of the community and owned by the very people who live there. You may have jumped around for whatever reasons, but people still do well in public schools. Your claim that teachers are only interested in pensions, benefits, and a status quo is disgusting. But that's not surprise that you want to kill education for most of America.
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Old 09-08-2015, 02:38 PM
 
3,762 posts, read 1,678,332 times
Reputation: 5150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anchorhead1977 View Post
No. Schools are the center of the community and owned by the very people who live there. You may have jumped around for whatever reasons, but people still do well in public schools. Your claim that teachers are only interested in pensions, benefits, and a status quo is disgusting. But that's not surprise that you want to kill education for most of America.
Hey, don't take it personal! I'm not making personal attacks, just suggesting improvements for a system that fails many and has for generations. Another season of failure starts tomorrow in Troy, Schenectady and Albany. 4 years from now, or 2, these freshmen will be wandering the streets with 50 more years of wandering to look forward to.

Suburban districts work fine in most or many cases. City school districts are another matter and it is in these that a new approach is needed. More of the same, another generation or two or wasted lives just to preserve the status quo is unacceptable.
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Old 09-08-2015, 03:13 PM
 
Location: San Marcos, CA
674 posts, read 403,575 times
Reputation: 792
Letting kids move around for school is a bad idea.

For universities, it's okay, because we don't have local universities everywhere (or even most places), nor should we. Plus, by that point, it's okay for the kid to be away on her own. Not everyone goes to university, either.

At the high school level, kids live with their families, and we need to education everyone. Putting disproportionate resources into some schools would just widen the gap between the haves and the have-nots. Eventually, a few elite schools would get everyone (surprise, surprise, but they'd be the kids of the people who are already elite), and everyone else would be locked out of the system forever. It's already sort of like this, with rich kids going off to expensive boarding schools.

As things are, kids can still go to the local public school and maintain a reasonable chance of getting into a top university. At least, their chances aren't so much worse than the chances of kids going to stronger high schools. Further stratefying the system would destroy that.
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Old 09-08-2015, 06:30 PM
 
174 posts, read 88,674 times
Reputation: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyfan View Post
Hey, don't take it personal! I'm not making personal attacks, just suggesting improvements for a system that fails many and has for generations. Another season of failure starts tomorrow in Troy, Schenectady and Albany. 4 years from now, or 2, these freshmen will be wandering the streets with 50 more years of wandering to look forward to.

Suburban districts work fine in most or many cases. City school districts are another matter and it is in these that a new approach is needed. More of the same, another generation or two or wasted lives just to preserve the status quo is unacceptable.
Sorry if I'm getting overly passionate. I'm just tired of everyone trying to make money by circumventing what truly needs to be done - working with at risk kids and parents. Anyway, community schools are important. Charters and even magnets usually create horrible logistics for families. It's hard for parents (especially poor ones) to be involved when the school is too far away. It's hard for kids to maintain friends and afterschool activities when much of their time is spent on transportation. A good neighborhood school enhances the community. That's what we should be working on.
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