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Old 08-11-2015, 05:58 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Quote:
Originally Posted by futureATLien View Post
I grew up in Maryland, I took Algebra in the 7th grade, then Geometry, Algebra II, PreCalc, then AP Calc and Stats. But I'm an exception.

Yes you are, even for Maryland. How many kids were in your class?
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Old 08-11-2015, 06:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Yes you are, even for Maryland. How many kids were in your class?
Just about everyone in our kids' high school (and most of the better schools around us) that were college bound took that courseload, it's certainly not an exception. Head over to the college board websites and you will see that, especially for any STEM oriented kids. Most did not take stats though I guess, most took multivariable instead.
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Old 08-11-2015, 06:42 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qwerty View Post
Just about everyone in our kids' high school (and most of the better schools around us) that were college bound took that courseload, it's certainly not an exception. Head over to the college board websites and you will see that, especially for any STEM oriented kids. Most did not take stats though I guess, most took multivariable instead.

It certainly is an exception in most schools. And yes, I know what the College Board says. The reality on the ground is different in most places.

Most regular high schools are lucky to put a Calc A/B class together let alone have almost all the kids take it. The same way with a lot of the advanced courses.

When the average 9th grader is entering high school 2 years behind grade level in Reading and a comparative, or larger, deficit in Math it's kind of hard to offer advanced courses that required Alg I in 7th grade.

But what do I know? I only taught high school for almost 32 years.
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Old 08-11-2015, 08:03 AM
 
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A lot of this is because the schools are pushing the curriculum to earlier grades, but that does not mean the students are ready for it.
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Old 08-11-2015, 08:38 AM
 
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In the sixties where I went, Algebra 1 & 2 were 9B, 9A; Algebra 3 was 10B; Geometry 1 & 2 were 10A, 11B; Algebra 4 was 11A, Trig was 12B, Calculus 1 was 12A. This coincided with 9th grade Biology, 10th grade Chemistry, 11th grade Physics and Qualitative Analysis; 12th grade Quantitative Analysis and other science electives like Physics 3, Microbiology, Physiology and Anatomy, Computer Math, Organic Chemistry etc. This was a public school system no less, this school attendable by any qualified kid in the system, for free (you pay your own bus fare, student discount).

We had school years that began in Sept or started at the end of January. Good system. Double promotions a half grade were doable and gifted students often were (including me, twice).
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Old 08-11-2015, 09:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
It certainly is an exception in most schools. And yes, I know what the College Board says. The reality on the ground is different in most places.

Most regular high schools are lucky to put a Calc A/B class together let alone have almost all the kids take it. The same way with a lot of the advanced courses.

When the average 9th grader is entering high school 2 years behind grade level in Reading and a comparative, or larger, deficit in Math it's kind of hard to offer advanced courses that required Alg I in 7th grade.

But what do I know? I only taught high school for almost 32 years.
At your school maybe....teaching for 32 years doesn't make you an expert on every school...but from my experience, most college bound kids are taking at least AP Calc AB and the STEM focused ones taking BC Calc and more. Our school had 3 sections of BC calc and I don't know how many, 8 or so of AB. Classes are about 550 kids. Just about every school around us has similar. Sure, some of the really small schools with 100 or less in a class might only offer AB but you also have to remember that kids that go to schools like that often take classes at a community college or online now to fulfill the requirements.
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:00 AM
 
14,754 posts, read 15,017,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qwerty View Post
At your school maybe....teaching for 32 years doesn't make you an expert on every school...but from my experience, most college bound kids are taking at least AP Calc AB and the STEM focused ones taking BC Calc and more. Our school had 3 sections of BC calc and I don't know how many, 8 or so of AB. Classes are about 550 kids. Just about every school around us has similar. Sure, some of the really small schools with 100 or less in a class might only offer AB but you also have to remember that kids that go to schools like that often take classes at a community college or online now to fulfill the requirements.
Not all AP calculus classes are equal though.

Do the math: too much calculus? - The Washington Post

Quote:
I donít want to alarm students who think taking calculus in high school is the key to a brilliant future. But leaders in math education are warning that, in many schools, that course is a mess, causing bright students to forsake, rather than embrace, their dream of a career in math and science.

This is not true for students who take Advanced Placement calculus and score at least a 3 on the 5-point exam, but they make up only a third of the 600,000 students who take high school calculus each year. The rest are in trouble, because colleges donít know what to do with them.
Kids who take it and don't do well enough on the exam are a real problem.
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:18 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
28,010 posts, read 33,718,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qwerty View Post
At your school maybe....teaching for 32 years doesn't make you an expert on every school...but from my experience, most college bound kids are taking at least AP Calc AB and the STEM focused ones taking BC Calc and more. Our school had 3 sections of BC calc and I don't know how many, 8 or so of AB. Classes are about 550 kids. Just about every school around us has similar. Sure, some of the really small schools with 100 or less in a class might only offer AB but you also have to remember that kids that go to schools like that often take classes at a community college or online now to fulfill the requirements.
And yet you keep ignoring the references I posted which had the numbers. What was it? 16% if I remember. So, your schools and your close ones, are outliers.

Sorry, that's the way it is.

And yes, teaching 32 years, with my "additional duties as assigned" does make me somewhat of an expert on "what other schools are doing".
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:49 AM
 
4,982 posts, read 4,434,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Not all AP calculus classes are equal though.

Do the math: too much calculus? - The Washington Post



Kids who take it and don't do well enough on the exam are a real problem.
I can second that from experience. The problem is they think they are more prepared than they actually are. This is especially true if they got an "A' in the course but a 1 or 2 on the exam. Those students will often think the test was the problem, or that they have "test anxiety" or something... not realizing that whatever their school was calling AP Calc was pure crap that didn't actually cover all the material, or that all the math classes they took leading up to AP Calc actually left them under-prepared and they are in no way ready for college math. Then they get to college and tank it, believing that THEY are the problem.

This is especially true for kids who came from underperforming schools, or schools that serve mostly low income/first gen kids that call themselves "college prep" high schools. Sometimes those schools find they cannot catch kids up who have been in a crap system since kindergarten, where even the best and most motivated students have been severely under-prepared. So, they slow the curriculum down accordingly but don't change the names of the classes because if they told the truth they'd lose funding.
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Old 08-11-2015, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Mount Laurel
4,106 posts, read 7,196,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qwerty View Post
At your school maybe....teaching for 32 years doesn't make you an expert on every school...but from my experience, most college bound kids are taking at least AP Calc AB and the STEM focused ones taking BC Calc and more. Our school had 3 sections of BC calc and I don't know how many, 8 or so of AB. Classes are about 550 kids. Just about every school around us has similar. Sure, some of the really small schools with 100 or less in a class might only offer AB but you also have to remember that kids that go to schools like that often take classes at a community college or online now to fulfill the requirements.
That is certainly not the norm. What school district is this that over 50% of kids are in AP. Sure, there are school within each states that has school with the high percentage but certainly not the norm like the one below.

http://www.state.nj.us/education/pr/.../071900050.pdf
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