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Old 01-28-2008, 10:46 PM
 
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Curious what the opinion is on gifted education in the public school system. Is charter better? Is private better? What do you think? Like you here any experiences, good or bad.
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Old 01-29-2008, 11:50 AM
 
Location: The Big D
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My oldest is gifted. In our public school system we have gifted & talented magnet schools. The students have to be tested in order to apply and then get accepted. They take the top of the top 90%. She has been there since kindergarten and now we are in middle school. I would not trade it for ANYTHING!! There is not a private school around that can touch what she has been exposed to. Since all of the students are the cream of the crop they are all on the "same page" basically. Even in private schools you get a wide variety of learning capabilities so the teachers there can be just as restricted in their content as a normal public school. Look around in your area and see if any of the school districts offer some kind of program for gifted students.
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Old 01-29-2008, 11:54 AM
 
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In my experience, Public Schools offer a wider variety of experiences and social interactions. While there might be a misconception Private school kids are somehow "smarter", the actuality of it is that they are simply more priviledged--which says nothing for their actual intelligence or learning ability. As matter of fact, many children who need extra help are put into private schools specifically for that and it in turn slows the progress of others in the classroom.

Public school kids are usually well rounded and more comfortable with the spectrum of social situations that can come up after leaving the educational environment.

Just my opinion, of course. I'm sure there are exceptions
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Old 01-29-2008, 01:27 PM
 
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By private school, I was not talking about private school in general. It was in reference to a gifted school, one you have to test into. Sorry for the mix up.
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Old 01-29-2008, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Both my children tested in the gifted range with MAP and IQ testing. I don't really like labeling them as "gifted" but I sometimes do in order to gain access to special services.

In our last town, they were admitted into a selective, private "gifted" academy. Although academically challenging, I felt there were some serious shortcomings in social skill development. It seemed that many kids were sheltered and socially inept compared to their public school counterparts. And many parents felt that sports/P.E./recess programs (anything "non-academic") were irrelevant; whereas I feel they are very important to building social and leadership skills.

One benefit of private is that, because the classes are usually smaller, it is easier for the teacher to offer individualized curriculum tailored to various gifted ability levels.

I do feel though that the "best world" would be in a good, well-funded gifted program at a public school where a child can learn from a diverse group of peers and teachers. Unfortunately, with budget cuts and "no child left behind," these programs are becoming rare.
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Old 01-29-2008, 07:57 PM
 
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It depends on the specific school and what they have to offer.
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Old 01-29-2008, 08:38 PM
 
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I was put under "GT" when I was in elementary. I went up through the gt program at my intermediate school also.. I ended up dropping out of the program and Im kinda glad I did. I really felt they "shelter" you from the other children trying to help you... but in actuality end up hurting you socially. I would really recommended keeping your kids in public school and ya let them do the GT program but make sure its not anything secluding them from everyone else like they did to me... it was no good.
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Old 01-29-2008, 10:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornwell View Post
I was put under "GT" when I was in elementary. I went up through the gt program at my intermediate school also.. I ended up dropping out of the program and Im kinda glad I did. I really felt they "shelter" you from the other children trying to help you... but in actuality end up hurting you socially. I would really recommended keeping your kids in public school and ya let them do the GT program but make sure its not anything secluding them from everyone else like they did to me... it was no good.
Yes, I do have concerns with that. And the labeling as "gifted" as well. It is a bit segregating. I just want to do whats best. Thanks for the replies. They are really eye openers.
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Old 01-29-2008, 10:38 PM
 
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Haha Im 18 now a senior... and Even without staying in the "GT" classes I've done fine. High SAT, team captain for tennis, decent gpa, I've never been much into busy work keeping me from a perfect one haha, and Im more integrated into the school then many kids that stayed in.
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Old 01-30-2008, 03:42 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
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I took GT classes from 1st grade until 10th grade in public schools in MO and TX. Since the only GT classes offered were math and English, I had a lot of interaction with other students and didn't feel segregated at all.

A lot of my GT classmates left for college early; I ended up leaving for college after 10th grade.
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