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Old 10-23-2015, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
4,444 posts, read 4,944,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lae60 View Post
I have no idea where you got the cost per student, but I am guessing it is not correct for the actual homeschool cost across the board.

I am homeschooling 2 kids, both in 7th grade now. I expect the cost will go up as they need more science lab classes/supplies in high school, but this is what we incur as costs now:

Science book plus workbook $60 + $15

lab supplies, estimating $50

Field trip --Went on a one day whale watching trip $20

Field Trip --Went on a one day boat lab class--caught microscopic organisms in a net and viewed with a microscope, biologist teacher on boat $60

PE, weekly lessons (martial arts) at $15 a week = $645 for the school year

Surfing Lessons $60

Social Studies: Book $69, plus workbook $18

Living History Field Trips--3 - $50 each

Museum, $18

Mythology Book $35

Writing Book, Spelling Book $16, $12

Greek cards and book $33

Math Book $68

Math Computer License $99

Culinary Arts elective--Chef's academy for kids $30 / week = $1350

plus art and craft supplies and special interest

Plus general school supplies--paper etc.

So the total with out the general supplies or 'project' costs is $2778.
I just have to say that your kids are very, very lucky!

But yeah, the state should at least reimburse a lot of these expenses (as well as allowing access to school facilities, which we all pay for).
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
A wonderful compromise is a home school based charter school. A charter school is a public school and receives public monies. The money is used for curriculum, supplies, classes, and activity groups. The students have access to such things as science labs, p.e. classes, art classes, music classes, creative writing classes, foreign language classes, etc. The classes are taught by credentialed teachers. The students are free to enroll or not in the classes, as they choose. The "price" for this is becoming accountable to the charter school, including standardized testing and meeting regularly with an education adviser who is a credentialed teacher.

My daughter was a home school student for 3 years. We did one year independently, then two years with a local home school based charter school.
That sounds like a neat idea. Are kids able to take classes based on their progress, like if they're really good at math, they can take math classes higher than their grade level and so forth?
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:11 PM
 
9,447 posts, read 4,991,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbab5 View Post
No, we should not give incentives for homeschooling, and here's why.

I think homeschooling is terrific, but only when done correctly by invested parents. Right now the bar to get into homeschooling is pretty high, you have to register, do paperwork, keep records, etc, and it's not completely user friendly or cheap (one parent usually has to forgo paid employment). Which limits the current homeschoolers to MOSTLY the folks who take it seriously. The parents who research curriculum, plan, teach, track progress, and care about their kids' progress. This is why currently homeschoolers do so well.

But if you start giving people money to homeschool and to get kids out of public schools, what do you think is going to happen? Who is going to be motivated to take the money? And what do you think they're going to do with it? And what will happen to those poor kids who now can't even go to school because then their parents would lose their "beer money"?

Yeah. Very very bad idea.

This ^^^
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:16 PM
 
8,654 posts, read 5,566,275 times
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If you extended a credit to home school parents based on them taking responsibility for their child's education, wouldn't you have to do the same for private school parents? They are also removing their kids from the rolls of the public schools and saving the federal, state and local government money. And just like the home school parents, those with kids in private schools are paying taxes to support the public schools. Personally I don't have any problem with paying for my educational choices in addition to paying for public schools. It's a good use of money to educate kids. But if we're going to pay people to make other choices there are people other than homeschoolers who should also receive the benefits.
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:17 PM
 
Location: California side of the Sierras
10,154 posts, read 5,986,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
That sounds like a neat idea. Are kids able to take classes based on their progress, like if they're really good at math, they can take math classes higher than their grade level and so forth?
The students absolutely had the freedom to work at their own level.

It's been about 14 years now since my daughter was enrolled in this particular charter school. It remains very popular in my area. I do hope increased bureaucracy has not ruined their wonderful program.

The charter school had space on the grounds of a traditional public school. The traditional school and the charter school pooled some funds and built a modern science lab building. Students from both schools were able to benefit. Win-win.

Here is a link to the school, for any who are interested in this idea:

http://hcs.hickmanschools.org/
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:47 PM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,329 posts, read 3,914,111 times
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I don't think homeschooling should be encouraged, unless the child really cannot function (disability or gifted) in a public/private K-12 environment. A nice alternative could be one of the many online school programs. But those are really just a regular school, just done online from a computer.

A lot of homeschoolers only homeschool their kids because they don't want them attending school with non-Bible thumpers. Or because they are trying to shelter the kid.

Additionally, most parents aren't even qualified to teach material beyond basic concepts. Hiring private tutors for more complex concepts is another story.

As a teacher, I don't see how it's possible for one person to make lesson plans, design a curriculum, and give tests for 6 or 7 classes at a time unless you skimp on something.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:45 PM
 
Location: California side of the Sierras
10,154 posts, read 5,986,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
I don't think homeschooling should be encouraged, unless the child really cannot function (disability or gifted) in a public/private K-12 environment. A nice alternative could be one of the many online school programs. But those are really just a regular school, just done online from a computer.

A lot of homeschoolers only homeschool their kids because they don't want them attending school with non-Bible thumpers. Or because they are trying to shelter the kid.

Additionally, most parents aren't even qualified to teach material beyond basic concepts. Hiring private tutors for more complex concepts is another story.

As a teacher, I don't see how it's possible for one person to make lesson plans, design a curriculum, and give tests for 6 or 7 classes at a time unless you skimp on something.
Not everyone tries to recreate school at home.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,309 posts, read 8,991,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
Even if parents were offered a credit of $5000 a year per child, that would basically cut costs in half for public schooling for those children, and it would enable many more parents to educate their children at home (considering they're having to forego working at a job, etc.) Would this be a good idea or no?

Am I on the right track here, or am I barking up the wrong tree?
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbab5 View Post
I think homeschooling is terrific, but only when done correctly by invested parents. .
What everyone is forgetting, is WHY homeschooling is done...and why the gov't doesn't really care for it. It has nothing to do with money, or testing, or better grades/success for the child.

Homeschooling is done for a variety of reasons, but the most important one is parental control. Tickle any homeschooling parent, and you will soon enough find in most of them, a distrust of government, a dislike of the curriculum and ideas prevalent in public schools, and a desire to stress certain religious beliefs and moral behavior traits not known to be highly regarded in public schools.

In short, these parents feel that their children belong to them, not to the state, and they do not wish to have their kids exposed to sex education, theory of evolution, common core, or fill in the blank______________.

These parents feel that the government is trying to take over the minds, morals, politics, and lifestyles of their children, and thus are very motivated to bring them up as they see fit, not as the state sees fit.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,993 posts, read 5,625,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
I haven't found a thread that asks this question, so I thought I'd launch this as a discussion topic. I read recently that the average homeschooled child costs about $600 a year to educate, while a publicly-school child costs $9000-$10,000 a year to educate. And yet, there's a great deal of evidence which demonstrates that homeschooled children do just as well, if not better than public-schooled kids.

The question is thus - in the interest of saving money, shouldn't local and state governments do all they can to promote the homeschool movement, seeing how it's so much cheaper and quite possibly more effective?

Even if parents were offered a credit of $5000 a year per child, that would basically cut costs in half for public schooling for those children, and it would enable many more parents to educate their children at home (considering they're having to forego working at a job, etc.) Would this be a good idea or no?

Currently, about 3% of school-age children in the USA are being homeschooled - if this was increased to say, 10%, or even 15% - it would certainly take the pressure off overloaded school districts - no need to keep building new school buildings (or those horrible trailers they use around here). It'd be easier to have smaller class sizes with fewer students in the system, and with more parents having the flexibility to homeschool, perhaps many children would be spared bullying (which goes on despite our best attempts to eradicate it) and misdiagnosing of ADHD just because they fidget a bit too much in class.

Am I on the right track here, or am I barking up the wrong tree?
The cost is higher, as one really must take into account opportunity cost. For example, If an executive sacrifices $100K of income to home school three kids, then than the annual cost must be $33,333.33 per kid per annum plus the $600 or $33,933,33.

Say that individual is able to teach say ten kids, then the cost drops to $10,600+ per kid. Now we have a ball game.

We should then consider the content being learned and the opportunity cost of those kids. From what I notice, kids can learn what they learn in perhaps four hours. The rest of the time is spent socializing in some adult-designed structure. What is lost is personal exploration, freedom, kid-to-kid socializing and playtime. Those are hard to quantify but expensive.

What about the $100K executive versus the teacher or combo of teachers? That is not obvious. Some people would be amazing as teachers. And some public school teachers are amazing. But right now, many states essentially deem the executive as unworthy. This is a mistake.

I think you are on the right track.

Homeschooling should increase.

Many kids would be better off.

Class sizes would be smaller.

There would be greater flexibility.

The kids would have more fun.

S.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 76,646,398 times
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I would consider homeschooling today now that I know more about it and more about how and what public schools are teaching.
But I would use learning groups and virtual schools.
Then enhance it at home, especially the core subjects and those lost subjects like Geography.

Not because I'm a bible thumper and not because I don't trust the government.
But because our schools have strayed and kids are not retaining the information taught today.
Short term memory enforcement to pass the annual state tests is what I see and indirectly told to do
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