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Old 10-23-2015, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,882 posts, read 3,557,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post

Even if parents were offered a credit of $5000 a year per child, that would basically cut costs in half for public schooling for those children, and it would enable many more parents to educate their children at home (considering they're having to forego working at a job, etc.) Would this be a good idea or no?
Bad idea.

I support home schooling (my kids went to Catholic school all their lives).

You would have to hand out my tax money to people who are already home schooling, plus any others who want to give it a try.

Some people may give it a try just to "cash in" which would end up hurting the students and giving home schooling a bad name.

You would also face pressure from people like me who use private school, and who would ask "where's my money?"
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,883,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bande1102 View Post
I homeschooled my 3 children, while working f/t, from birth thru high school. Two have graduated college and third is midway thru----at 16.

I would have loved cash; but I would've also loved a tax credit, for even a portion of what was given to the school for each of my children.

I also would have appreciated having access to things my local school district denied us b/c my kids didn't attend the school, despite the fact that the schools were still getting money for my kids.

For example, my homeschool group (comprised entirely of kids who would have attended that particular school) was denied use of the gym; despite the fact that other local organizations were allowed to use it. We were denied resources, like the school's library, nor were our children allowed to participate in extracurricular sports.

We worked around all of those obstacles, but still.....
This is interesting...

In Colorado:

-- Schools get money for each child enrolled. If a kid is not enrolled, then the school does not get the money.

-- Children can participate in extracurricular sports at a particular school if the child is homeschooled or if the child's school does not offer that particular sport.

-- Parents can open enroll their children into a school outside of their attendance area or even outside their district if that school has openings available. The state money also follows the student.

As for the others, wouldn't a public library have more resources? If I homeschooled, I would rather take my child to the larger public library than the school's library.

Also, here, groups that use the gym at public schools must rent the gym. If the other organizations were renting it, why should you get it for free? Plus because other organizations made arrangements to rent the gym during off hours, there might not have been space in the schedule for your group.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:16 PM
 
8,700 posts, read 5,062,944 times
Reputation: 9832
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
What everyone is forgetting, is WHY homeschooling is done...and why the gov't doesn't really care for it. It has nothing to do with money, or testing, or better grades/success for the child.

Homeschooling is done for a variety of reasons, but the most important one is parental control. Tickle any homeschooling parent, and you will soon enough find in most of them, a distrust of government, a dislike of the curriculum and ideas prevalent in public schools, and a desire to stress certain religious beliefs and moral behavior traits not known to be highly regarded in public schools.

In short, these parents feel that their children belong to them, not to the state, and they do not wish to have their kids exposed to sex education, theory of evolution, common core, or fill in the blank______________.

These parents feel that the government is trying to take over the minds, morals, politics, and lifestyles of their children, and thus are very motivated to bring them up as they see fit, not as the state sees fit.
Meh. In my experience, it is more about being dissatisfied with the quality of public education. Many public schools are overcrowded and underfunded. With the federal government dictating how educators must spend their class time, teachers have their hands tied. Too much time is spent "teaching to the test". We are moving in the wrong direction, IMO.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:20 PM
 
20 posts, read 50,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
I haven't found a thread that asks this question, so I thought I'd launch this as a discussion topic. I read recently that the average homeschooled child costs about $600 a year to educate, while a publicly-school child costs $9000-$10,000 a year to educate. And yet, there's a great deal of evidence which demonstrates that homeschooled children do just as well, if not better than public-schooled kids.

The question is thus - in the interest of saving money, shouldn't local and state governments do all they can to promote the homeschool movement, seeing how it's so much cheaper and quite possibly more effective?

Even if parents were offered a credit of $5000 a year per child, that would basically cut costs in half for public schooling for those children, and it would enable many more parents to educate their children at home (considering they're having to forego working at a job, etc.) Would this be a good idea or no?

Currently, about 3% of school-age children in the USA are being homeschooled - if this was increased to say, 10%, or even 15% - it would certainly take the pressure off overloaded school districts - no need to keep building new school buildings (or those horrible trailers they use around here). It'd be easier to have smaller class sizes with fewer students in the system, and with more parents having the flexibility to homeschool, perhaps many children would be spared bullying (which goes on despite our best attempts to eradicate it) and misdiagnosing of ADHD just because they fidget a bit too much in class.

Am I on the right track here, or am I barking up the wrong tree?
Yes, I'm all for home schooling, and local and state governments providing tax-incentives to support them and save costs. But, that would be much too logical and unfortunately most government bureaucrats are self-serving cretins.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
3,785 posts, read 9,193,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
If you extended a credit to home school parents based on them taking responsibility for their child's education, wouldn't you have to do the same for private school parents? They are also removing their kids from the rolls of the public schools and saving the federal, state and local government money. And just like the home school parents, those with kids in private schools are paying taxes to support the public schools. Personally I don't have any problem with paying for my educational choices in addition to paying for public schools. It's a good use of money to educate kids. But if we're going to pay people to make other choices there are people other than homeschoolers who should also receive the benefits.
Private school parents already have the coverdell ESA. Not a credit, but definitely tax savings.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
3,785 posts, read 9,193,949 times
Reputation: 7361
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
This is interesting...

In Colorado:

-- Schools get money for each child enrolled. If a kid is not enrolled, then the school does not get the money.

-- Children can participate in extracurricular sports at a particular school if the child is homeschooled or if the child's school does not offer that particular sport.

-- Parents can open enroll their children into a school outside of their attendance area or even outside their district if that school has openings available. The state money also follows the student.

As for the others, wouldn't a public library have more resources? If I homeschooled, I would rather take my child to the larger public library than the school's library.

Also, here, groups that use the gym at public schools must rent the gym. If the other organizations were renting it, why should you get it for free? Plus because other organizations made arrangements to rent the gym during off hours, there might not have been space in the schedule for your group.

Colorado sounds awesome!

We absolutely used and preferred the public library; however, the local school was more convenient.

My homeschool group did not want to use the gym for free...I mean we would have like to, but we were willing to pay what other organizations were paying.

The other organizations don't rent the school for use of the gym. They are simply required to pay the salary of the janitor required to be present. We tried to do that and were flat out denied simply because we were official homeschoolers. They literally told us that.

We ended up joining other leagues that did not specify they were homeschooling leagues, paid the janitor and used the gym. Ridiculous.
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Old 10-23-2015, 03:29 PM
 
6,319 posts, read 5,686,352 times
Reputation: 11932
I loathe homeschooling with a passion.

It is terrible for the child's social development, questionable at best for educational.

Part of our job as parents is to raise fully rounded human beings. You simply cannot achieve that with home schooling.

They NEED other people outside kin, like they need food and air.

Also, it hides a lot of child abuse.

Schools CATCH a lot of child abuse by Mandatory Reporting.

Nope, home schooling has absolutely zero benefit that I can see.

I will offend many I'm sure and I apologise for that.
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Old 10-23-2015, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,311,213 times
Reputation: 27564
Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
I loathe homeschooling with a passion.

It is terrible for the child's social development, questionable at best for educational.

Part of our job as parents is to raise fully rounded human beings. You simply cannot achieve that with home schooling.

They NEED other people outside kin, like they need food and air.

Also, it hides a lot of child abuse.

Schools CATCH a lot of child abuse by Mandatory Reporting.

Nope, home schooling has absolutely zero benefit that I can see.

I will offend many I'm sure and I apologise for that.
Homeschoolers can participate in school sports and UIL. (At least they can in Texas).
Do you think they spend all those years in a vacuum ?

Homeschool today is not like that at all.
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Old 10-23-2015, 03:37 PM
 
6,319 posts, read 5,686,352 times
Reputation: 11932
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
Homeschoolers can participate in school sports and UIL. (At least they can in Texas).
Do you think they spend all those years in a vacuum ?

Homeschool today is not like that at all.
And they will always, always be "those homeschooled kids" to their peers.

Excluded subtly from the get go.

The sort of social interactions I am talking about are ones you don't have to schedule. Ordinary every day giggling together at something funny. Playing chase with a new friend. Sharing the water fountain. On and on it goes, daily rituals that somehow brings a classroom full of kids of different backgrounds, cultures, environments, together into a "class", a cohesive group that associates with itself above others, as humans are designed to do.

You cannot schedule or fake this type of bonding. You have to be exposed to those other people on a daily basis.

Please educate yourself about the Dunbar Numbers.

Growing children need daily peer (non kin) interaction like they need air.
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Old 10-23-2015, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Back and Beyond
2,821 posts, read 2,722,264 times
Reputation: 6552
Alaska already does this. A child in homeschool will receive a $1800-$2500 allotment per year depending on which homeschool program is enrolled. Freeloaders and moochers don't take advantage of this because the money can only be spent on certain things (curriculum, laptop (with stipulations), stuff relating to the child's individual learning plan, etc). It all has to be approved on an individual basis, they don't just hand you a blank check.

We kind of fell into the homeschooling program by accident. My 5 year old was born on the cut off date to enroll in Kindergarden. So he would have been the youngest one in the class. We were on the fence about this, then the bus schedule came out. His bus ride would have been 1.5 hours long each way even though we are about 20-25 mins from the school. We decided that we would wait a year for that and see.

Anyways, we didn't want him to get behind so we enrolled him in a local homeschool program. It's affiliated with the school district, so the students can use the schools amenities and play sports, etc. There is quite a few kids in the homeschool program and they will have field trips and other get togethers (optional) on a monthly basis or so. All the kids seem completely normal (not abused, and socially adjusted). My son plays sports weekly, and plays with his friends several times a week on top of that. He is very outgoing and a polite young kid.

My son has a $1900 allotment for his learning this year. So we ordered an awesome curriculum from timber doodle for about $600. It came with everything you can imagine in a kindergarden class and more. Science Experiments, building blocks, art projects, lots of work books, puzzles, etc. The whole nine yards. My son LOVES it and the work books have already taught him to read very well just a few months in. I doubt we will be able to spend the whole allotment this year and probably won't. Maybe we will enroll him in music and get him a keyboard to learn on.

We have to post grades and the teacher comes for home visits occasionally but other than that it's really up to the parents. It seems to work out good and most of the parents I've met in the homeschool program seem to really want to do it and they have their stuff together. They aren't abusing the system for the allotment money and the kids seem smart and well adjusted socially. Still not sure if we will continue homeschooling next year, but t has been a great success so far for us this year.

Alaska is also a no notice homeschool state. If you don't want the allotment money, you can teach your kids trapping all day if you pleased, no tests or check ups or grades. The allotment money also can't be used to purchase any sort of religious curriculum.
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