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Old 10-23-2015, 04:45 PM
 
Location: California side of the Sierras
10,158 posts, read 5,988,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
And they will always, always be "those homeschooled kids" to their peers.

Excluded subtly from the get go.

The sort of social interactions I am talking about are ones you don't have to schedule. Ordinary every day giggling together at something funny. Playing chase with a new friend. Sharing the water fountain. On and on it goes, daily rituals that somehow brings a classroom full of kids of different backgrounds, cultures, environments, together into a "class", a cohesive group that associates with itself above others, as humans are designed to do.

You cannot schedule or fake this type of bonding. You have to be exposed to those other people on a daily basis.

Please educate yourself about the Dunbar Numbers.

Growing children need daily peer (non kin) interaction like they need air.
Why do you feel home schooled children lack this sort of interaction?
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Old 10-23-2015, 05:18 PM
 
8,686 posts, read 4,931,979 times
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I'd be against it, but it has nothing to do with home schooling vs the reality that most parents have no clue. The reason the kids who are currently homeschooled do so well is highly tied to self selection--these are kids and parents who really care about education and would do well in any school for the most part.

But they are by far the minority of parents. If you took all the bottom feeding parents and had them homeschool their own kids, you'd see a huge drop in results lower than the current school system.
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Old 10-23-2015, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Florida
7,198 posts, read 4,577,850 times
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I don't think anyone needs to encourage homeschooling, to be honest. The implementation of Common Core and the crowding, understaffed classrooms, zero tolerance absurdities, etc, are prompting many parents to pull their kids out. I've met lots of parents who have just pulled their kids last year or this year, and I would guess that it's growing faster than before.

I homeschool, but I would not accept money for homeschooling. That just gives the government more license to interfere and to try to make homeschooling just like public schooling. Since I've opted out of the system for a reason, I don't wish to recreate it at home.

As for the comments about kids staying isolated and home and homeschooling being a cover for abuse... you have no clue how homeschooling works, obviously. My children are active in activities, and their peers are always surprised to learn that they homeschool. They aren't walking around pale-faced and stuttering, with big "H"s on them. They're just normal kids. Educate yourself before you spout such nonsense.
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Old 10-23-2015, 05:31 PM
 
6,319 posts, read 6,258,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Why do you feel home schooled children lack this sort of interaction?
Because, by definition, they do.

Homeschooling means you mainly associate with kin.

This does not = learning how to live in a Bigger World.

Also, what parent can honestly self evaluate their own skills to the point of truly believing they can (or even should) do it all?

A raving narcissist?

The rest of us would have doubts about our own abilities to adequately teach our children absolutely everything to Professional Standard! And so we should!

Again, the job of a parent is to prepare little human beings for an Adult world, which includes the child learning to adapt to uncomfortable situations, new teachers, bosses, crowds, rigid hours, all that stuff that comes with Successful Adulthood.
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Old 10-23-2015, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Arizona
6,625 posts, read 6,215,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Why do you feel home schooled children lack this sort of interaction?
Maybe because they are not in a room with 20 other kids and in a building with 300 kids. The kids in the school also have the same after school activities so you can't say that is a substitute. They still go to museums but on the weekend.

They will not meet the same variety of kids when they are home schooled.

When I meet a homeschooler I always ask what material they use to teach evolution. That is usually a telling sign.
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Old 10-23-2015, 05:39 PM
 
3,397 posts, read 3,343,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
What everyone is forgetting, is WHY homeschooling is done...and why the gov't doesn't really care for it. It has nothing to do with money, or testing, or better grades/success for the child.

Homeschooling is done for a variety of reasons, but the most important one is parental control. Tickle any homeschooling parent, and you will soon enough find in most of them, a distrust of government, a dislike of the curriculum and ideas prevalent in public schools, and a desire to stress certain religious beliefs and moral behavior traits not known to be highly regarded in public schools.

In short, these parents feel that their children belong to them, not to the state, and they do not wish to have their kids exposed to sex education, theory of evolution, common core, or fill in the blank______________.

These parents feel that the government is trying to take over the minds, morals, politics, and lifestyles of their children, and thus are very motivated to bring them up as they see fit, not as the state sees fit.
What too many people fail to understand is that their children belong to neither their parents nor the state. Children belong to themselves and not their parents. Parents do not have the right to forbid their children to learn things that are appropriate, such as paleoanthropology or natural selection. Neither do they have the right to force their children to believe in a particular faith. It is up to parents to care for their children, guide them and teach them the path the parents want them to choose. But ultimately, it is the child's right to learn what other children learn and to believe what he chooses to believe.

The homeschooling done by Lae60 is qualitatively different from that practiced by what some have indelicately called Bible-thumpers. A liberal education in the traditional sense enlightens a child and gives him the ability to think critically and the knowledge base on which to make appropriate decisions. An education which confines the roots and snips the branches of a child contained in a rigid, limited society creates bonsai children who will either blindly follow their parents wishes or rebel without the ability to make decisions based on knowledge and experience.

State education provides a clear structure to students and parents so that they know exactly what they are getting. In many regions of the US, corporate influences have led to a breakdown of the traditional structure that worked so well for decades (for the most part, excepting race issues). Now the mission of developing each child in a push for self-actualization has been substituted with preparing children to be good worker drones. If schools drop liberal education for test prep driven arts/science/social studies-free test centers for children, parents have a dual duty to homeschool their children while pushing vigorously for the children of those who choose not to homeschool. All children need an excellent education, and all citizens benefit from living amongst a well-educated populace who make good decisions. Western Europe isn't perfect, but their schooling puts ours to shame.
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Old 10-23-2015, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Florida
7,198 posts, read 4,577,850 times
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So wait, kids learn better how to live in an adult world when they're in a classroom with 29 other children and one adult, than they do when they are actually out interacting in the adult world, kind of like, uh, adults do?

Most homeschooling parents do actually delegate parts of their kids' learning. I don't think I know any homeschoolers who keep their kids home all day and don't have them in a variety of classes and other activities. Just using my own as an example, one takes an art class (at a community art center, run by an actual artist), a science class (taught by a real biologist) and dance classes (at a dance studio). The other runs a league for his favorite hobby and travels around the country, participating with adults and kids alike. They both enjoy interacting with friends and doing normal teen/tween things. They have relationships with people in other countries, as travel and cultural immersion is important to our family. One takes classes through our state's online school. We will be holding a Shakespeare class in the spring (taught by me). They have participated in co-ops, learned languages from native speakers, been to other countries, hosted visitors from other countries (we host exchange students and currently have a teen from Japan living in our home for a year), and learned from experts in their fields.

Your silly vision of a mom holding school around the kitchen table while the kids wish they could go out and talk to other children is pretty much made up in your head.
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Old 10-23-2015, 05:58 PM
 
Location: California side of the Sierras
10,158 posts, read 5,988,950 times
Reputation: 11619
Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
Because, by definition, they do.

Homeschooling means you mainly associate with kin.
No, it doesn't mean that at all.

On what are you basing your statements? What is your experience with home schooling?

Because I will tell you, what you are describing does not at all describe the home schooling experience of my family or of the hundreds of families with whom we interacted regularly.
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Old 10-23-2015, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
4,426 posts, read 10,255,629 times
Reputation: 9264
Public school is THE most artificial environment I can envision for educating children. I find the socialization argument particularly amusing. I have so much more I could write, but I don't feel like it. I would suggest everyone who espouses public education to research the history and evolution of public school.

I also wish those against homeschooling would question the teachers & administrators in charge of public education the way they question homeschoolers. Not to break off on another tangent, but have you looked at the college curriculum and tests required of the teachers who teach your child in public school? Have you asked who came up with the specific curriculum and how/why? Have you read the textbooks being used? Because I did all of these things. I was very disappointed to say the least.
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Old 10-23-2015, 06:16 PM
 
Location: California side of the Sierras
10,158 posts, read 5,988,950 times
Reputation: 11619
Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
Maybe because they are not in a room with 20 other kids and in a building with 300 kids. The kids in the school also have the same after school activities so you can't say that is a substitute. They still go to museums but on the weekend.

They will not meet the same variety of kids when they are home schooled.

When I meet a homeschooler I always ask what material they use to teach evolution. That is usually a telling sign.
When we home schooled, we went to classes, activities, and/or play groups nearly every day. My daughter met a wide variety of kids, as there were literally hundreds of kids in our charter school, as well as independents who subscribed to the same newsletter which we did. It came out monthly and contained all the "what is going on" info.

My daughter was not old enough to study evolution as a stand alone, but of course it is present in other science topics. At her age, we spent more time studying animals, ecosystems, cells, etc. I allowed her interests to lead what we chose to study. She loves animals, so that is how that came about. The science classes she took were mainly about astronomy and earth science. The classes taught at the charter school were taught by credentialed teachers. Some of the classes she took were taught at the local community college and offered through their "college for kids" program. They were not college level courses, it was just a convenient place to take a class. To be honest, I do not know the qualifications of the adults teaching those particular classes. I trusted the community college to provide sufficiently knowledgeable instructors.
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