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Old 10-23-2015, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,870 posts, read 1,739,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
I don't think homeschooling should be encouraged, unless the child really cannot function (disability or gifted) in a public/private K-12 environment. A nice alternative could be one of the many online school programs. But those are really just a regular school, just done online from a computer.

A lot of homeschoolers only homeschool their kids because they don't want them attending school with non-Bible thumpers. Or because they are trying to shelter the kid.

Additionally, most parents aren't even qualified to teach material beyond basic concepts. Hiring private tutors for more complex concepts is another story.

As a teacher, I don't see how it's possible for one person to make lesson plans, design a curriculum, and give tests for 6 or 7 classes at a time unless you skimp on something.
Guess I totally disagree with the idea of WHY people homeschool their kids. In my school district about 30% of the kids are homeschooled--either independently, through informal groups with parents sharing teaching, or through Charter schools.

The reason is because the local school district is failing and will do nothing to address that problem. Each year they move around the teachers and principals and give the teachers 1/2 day of 'training' but it does not help. In fact the 1/2 day of training takes a 1/2 day of education from the kids. I know of seniors in high school who still have study hall instead of being placed in classes--and school started in Aug. The counselors are to 'busy' to get the kid's schedules completed. But they say, 'no worry, the kids will get credit for sitting in study hall if they behave'. So much for the education part

I do not know of a single kid out of hundreds that I know that are homeschooled that are in a homeschool program just for religious reasons. Generally it has to do with something lacking in the public school--either the correct academic program for a special kid or enrichment, safety --violence at school, bullying/teasing (which runs heavy in my area's school district) or the coordination of the school schedule and parent's work schedule--travel opportunities that the kids get to go on.

On-line programs are not for all kids. My kids needed extra help on certain subjects, and on-line is highly structured and would not work. Plus with reading they really just needed someone to listen and correct them. That would not happen on-line. And on-line is not a good match for kids that are social and need that social interaction to learn best. It is good for some learning styles, but not many. And generally its boring

I, too, am a credentialed teacher for math, chemistry and general science, but only teach as a homeschool parent now. I do have a different full time job. It is not that hard to put together lessons for kids for all the subjects. Elementary teachers do it every day if they are any good. And homeschool parents do use other sources than themselves. There are lab classes and art, PE, history, etc. designed just for the homeschooled kids. And there are also tutors


And you are right in skimping on some things. Most homeschoolers do skip on original tests. We use the test books for the text, and do not need to make original ones.

Last edited by lae60; 10-23-2015 at 09:13 PM..
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Old 10-23-2015, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,870 posts, read 1,739,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
I loathe homeschooling with a passion.

It is terrible for the child's social development, questionable at best for educational.

Part of our job as parents is to raise fully rounded human beings. You simply cannot achieve that with home schooling.

They NEED other people outside kin, like they need food and air.

Also, it hides a lot of child abuse.

Schools CATCH a lot of child abuse by Mandatory Reporting.

Nope, home schooling has absolutely zero benefit that I can see.

I will offend many I'm sure and I apologise for that.
Lack of Social Development???

You have got to be kidding!

This month my son has 2 weekends camping with Boy Scouts, and one additional Saturday doing a fair with Boy Scouts, operating a booth. Plus the weekly meeting.

My daughter went through a corn maze at the pumpkin patch with Girl Scouts plus the biweekly meetings this month.

Both have weekly classes at a kid's culinary arts class with about 12-20 kids that are signed up--some come each week, some come for a month then others take their place.

Both have martial arts weekly lessons, but can go twice a week if their schedules permit. These classes have about 15 kids, some the same for years, other new every few weeks.

They also swim about once a week at a public pool with whoever else is there.

This month they also went to the Grand Canyon Pumpkin Train ride and played with other kids at the pool there and at the haunted train and hay bale maze. This was a long holiday weekend trip.

They also go to the Boy's and Girl's Club M-F if they want after school to do the activities, crafts and sports with the other kids.

One would have to look hard to find 2 consecutive days where they do not have social interactions outside of the family!

And October is not even a busy month!

And my kid's schedule is not that different from other homeschooled kids I know.
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Old 10-23-2015, 09:03 PM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,184 posts, read 2,874,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lae60 View Post
Guess I totally disagree with the idea of WHY people homeschool their kids. In my school district about 30% of the kids are homeschooled--either independently, through informal groups with parents sharing teaching, or through Charter schools.

The reason is because the local school district is failing and will do nothing to address that problem.
Sorry to hear that. I completely forgot about crappy school districts. That seems like a perfectly logical reason to homeschool, especially if you cannot afford $10,000+ per year for private school. I'm from the Kansas City area and the school district here is one of the worst in the country.
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Old 10-23-2015, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,870 posts, read 1,739,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
Sorry to hear that. I completely forgot about crappy school districts. That seems like a perfectly logical reason to homeschool, especially if you cannot afford $10,000+ per year for private school. I'm from the Kansas City area and the school district here is one of the worst in the country.
And in my small rural area the only private school options are religious--fundie Christian or Catholic. There is not a private non-church related school around!
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Old 10-24-2015, 12:39 AM
 
1,313 posts, read 1,623,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
A wonderful compromise is a home school based charter school. A charter school is a public school and receives public monies. The money is used for curriculum, supplies, classes, and activity groups. The students have access to such things as science labs, p.e. classes, art classes, music classes, creative writing classes, foreign language classes, etc. The classes are taught by credentialed teachers. The students are free to enroll or not in the classes, as they choose. The "price" for this is becoming accountable to the charter school, including standardized testing and meeting regularly with an education adviser who is a credentialed teacher.

My daughter was a home school student for 3 years. We did one year independently, then two years with a local home school based charter school.
This! We were a 50/50 homeschooling family, where my child went to a charter homeschool program 2-3 days a week depending on the classes he wanted, and the rest of the work was done from home. It was wonderful. The class sizes were small, the teachers excited and engaged, and I was able to work. Homeschoolers don't experience a typical school day of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. You can get through material much faster with one student (or whatever pace is needed). Our class offerings were paid for by state monies that would have gone to our neighborhood school...a school that did not serve my child well. We had one designated teacher that looked over all of our home materials every quarter. It was a lovely time that I miss.

Now my child is in one of the best schools in the country. I attribute much of it to his time as a hybrid homeschooler.
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Old 10-24-2015, 12:48 AM
 
1,313 posts, read 1,623,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post

When I meet a homeschooler I always ask what material they use to teach evolution. That is usually a telling sign.
In all my time homeschooling I only met one religious homeschooler. The whole unschooling movement is the antithesis of rigid instruction based on religious texts.
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Old 10-24-2015, 07:29 AM
 
5,612 posts, read 4,178,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bande1102 View Post
Private school parents already have the coverdell ESA. Not a credit, but definitely tax savings.
That's for college not K-12. There's NO deduction/credit/ tax free savings plan for monies spent on private school during those years. And any parent, not just those with kids in private school, can use a Coverdell 529 plan to save for their kids college education.
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Old 10-24-2015, 08:18 AM
 
137 posts, read 99,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by angelenogirl View Post
This! We were a 50/50 homeschooling family, where my child went to a charter homeschool program 2-3 days a week depending on the classes he wanted, and the rest of the work was done from home. It was wonderful. The class sizes were small, the teachers excited and engaged, and I was able to work. Homeschoolers don't experience a typical school day of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. You can get through material much faster with one student (or whatever pace is needed). Our class offerings were paid for by state monies that would have gone to our neighborhood school...a school that did not serve my child well. We had one designated teacher that looked over all of our home materials every quarter. It was a lovely time that I miss.

Now my child is in one of the best schools in the country. I attribute much of it to his time as a hybrid homeschooler.
Yes!!! I agree!

What might work better than picking just one or the other is for subjective classes like History & Liberal Arts to be homeschooled, while more objective STEM courses be available publically. Then, parents could educate their kids with an la carte mix that would offer the better of both settings.

Send your tyke to school for half the day to learn math & physics...and then teach him or let him teach himself about the more subjective viewpoints on life at home...
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Old 10-24-2015, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,158 posts, read 3,091,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinemon View Post
Yes!!!

What might work better is for subjective classes like History & Liberal Arts to be homeschooled, while more objective STEM courses be available publically. Then, parents could educate their kids with an la carte mix that would offer the better of both settings.

Send your tyke to school for half the day to learn math & physics...and then teach him or let him teach himself about the more subjective viewpoints on life at home...

This is what we do, only we pay for the Science/Math/Foreign Language classes or have the kids do them through the state's free online program. I teach Social Studies and English myself, as these are subjects that I believe are not covered well in school.
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Old 10-24-2015, 08:31 AM
 
5,783 posts, read 3,069,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinemon View Post
Yes!!! I agree!

What might work better than picking just one or the other is for subjective classes like History & Liberal Arts to be homeschooled, while more objective STEM courses be available publically. Then, parents could educate their kids with an la carte mix that would offer the better of both settings.

Send your tyke to school for half the day to learn math & physics...and then teach him or let him teach himself about the more subjective viewpoints on life at home...
I'm not sure I'd assume schools can teach math & physics. Hard sciences seem to be one of the major weaknesses of schools. Seems almost like those who go into teaching themselves have math phobia and just pass that along to the kids. The best math & hard science teachers would be those (like Ivory) who first learned the material and then moved into teaching.
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