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Old 09-09-2016, 06:34 PM
 
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I skipped about 1.5 grades early on. That, plus a September birthday meant I was not quite 17 when I started freshman year of college and not quite 21 when I graduated college. Overall it was not a good thing for my social development. All's well that ends well, but I wouldn't do it to my kids. I'd rather find some additional activity they could do after/outside school to keep them academically challenged.
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Old 09-09-2016, 09:00 PM
Status: "Justice-two way street, and not just in favor of barbarians" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: New York Area
14,612 posts, read 5,782,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elhelmete View Post
I skipped about 1.5 grades early on. That, plus a September birthday meant I was not quite 17 when I started freshman year of college and not quite 21 when I graduated college. Overall it was not a good thing for my social development. All's well that ends well, but I wouldn't do it to my kids. I'd rather find some additional activity they could do after/outside school to keep them academically challenged.
I have a friend and law colleague that graduated law school in June after he had turned 21 that preceding February. He was off the charts bright.

He took a GRE exam when he was 15, after a year of high school. UCLA told his father that "that exam is to give disadvantaged people a chance." My friend's father suggested discussing that in court. So he matriculated when he was 15, finishing in three years. Thus, he started law school when he was 18, graduating when he was 21. His social development was about a year or so behind the more typical graduating age of 25, so really not far off.
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Old 09-11-2016, 01:32 AM
 
8,379 posts, read 7,467,948 times
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Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Worse than skipping grades and dealing with being young...

Being so bored and discouraged you start to just hate school and disengage altogether.


This happened to me. Even though I was 17 when I graduated and had enough honors/AP and natural standardized test taking ability to become a Natl Merit Scholar, I loathed school from 5th-11th (both districts tops in the country with tons of gifted, honors, and AP courses). I didn't bother with studying, did homework sporadically, and spent way more time in sports or reading on my own.
At the same time, age of graduation (@17 years old) can mean you graduated on June 25th and your b-day was two days later. Or a month or three later. Cut off dates.

Honor/AP classes & ACT/SAT scores aren't qualifiers/considerations for a National Merit Scholar award . That's all about the PSAT score.

Quote:
Thank god for senior year (got to pick my classes and most were AP with fantastic teachers) and college (where I feel like my intellect and passion came back to life).
I don't think you are that much older or younger than I am...I couldn't pick an AP class at any grade level. I had to qualify to be placed in them. But I went to a private school & it doesn't sound like you did? No snark involved.

As a Frosh? Had to take the mandatory Freshman English/History/Science requirements. It's the same today, in the same school, that my kids attend. You will not find a freshman sitting in any honors or AP class other than a math or a language. Those are the only advanced classes/fast-tracks a child can get in on during 9th grade.

Quote:
Putting kids on a conveyor belt can have terrible consequences. Blanket policies about skipping or no...eh...prolly not the most effective.
This is why my kids go to a top notch private k-12 & I bleed the cost of tuition like a stuck pig. We love the school, you can't beat the experience on any level. The good thing? If a parent perceives that their little genius is getting the short end? They are welcome to protest and demand their child be "challenged" - and skip a grade or put in to an honors/AP class.

How that ends up for the child? All I can tell you is that I've seen one get put right back in to her age-appropriate class after the 1st semester (elementary level) and several have dropped honor/AP HS classes, not even a full month in to the class (drop/add grace period is 30 school days after the class starts).

You're obviously no kind of dummy - physician, yes? You could have benefitted earlier on than you did, from hard core or more challenging classes. You're not the norm. It seems to me that everyone thinks their kid is a genius these days and because the majority of their children's peers can't barely tie their shoes by the time they hit 4th grade.

Where is the public standard? You have to teach to Susie who "eats boogers" at the same time you have to teach to Johnny, who is shoving pencils in his eyeballs b/c he's bored out of his mind.

Aged based vs. academically based learning. In a public school setting? Sounds simple to put the age-appropriate 5th grader who is "smarter than a 5th grader" in to a 6th or 7th grade class. But then what happens? Socially immature, emotionally immature...those "older kids" are not and will not be her peers outside of a classroom setting. Is it worth it, for the child?

The other question is, can that kid find herself flourishing/engaged/challenged in an age-appropriate grade outside of the school she currently attends? If so, that says a lot about the school she came from, and none of it is good.

Who is to blame in that circumstance, what is to blame?

What's the answer?

I don't think the answer is "my kid is a genius and the teachers/admin stink/stunk"...but I don't have the answer. The closest I can find to the answer is private independent for my kids.
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Old 09-12-2016, 07:57 PM
 
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My friend skipped 7th grade and was able to take the classes he belonged in (guy was really smart, I think his IQ is in the 200s). It really benefited his education.
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Old Yesterday, 10:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
Bad idea,
What's the point of having a kid start college at 16 and then is hanging out with 18-25 year old people that are always drinking
To get away from their parents.
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Old Yesterday, 10:41 AM
 
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I personally know a number of children that started college between the ages of 13-17. Of that a small subset skipped high school all together and went from 8th grade to college Some were home schooled others were from public schools. The point is the link between peer age and learning level is a relic of the past due to teacher lead classroom instruction. It is an artificial constraint put on the learning process.
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Old Yesterday, 12:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GhostOfAndrewJackson View Post
I personally know a number of children that started college between the ages of 13-17. Of that a small subset skipped high school all together and went from 8th grade to college Some were home schooled others were from public schools. The point is the link between peer age and learning level is a relic of the past due to teacher lead classroom instruction. It is an artificial constraint put on the learning process.
Well I don't know about their home situations although I figure they must've varied from child to child but for some people its good to start college earlier.
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Old Yesterday, 12:31 PM
 
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I skipped 2 grades before high school. It was fine intellectually but emotionally, being 2 years behind my peers was not good at all. College was even worse. I would not recommend it.
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Old Yesterday, 02:12 PM
 
7,826 posts, read 8,645,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostOfAndrewJackson View Post
I personally know a number of children that started college between the ages of 13-17. Of that a small subset skipped high school all together and went from 8th grade to college Some were home schooled others were from public schools. The point is the link between peer age and learning level is a relic of the past due to teacher lead classroom instruction. It is an artificial constraint put on the learning process.
Right on. US schooling is a rigid set of government programs designed towards the middle, rewarding and encouraging mediocrity.

Derivative of our son being a high IQ individual we've met dozens of kids ranging from workhorse overachievers to truly gifted kids like our boy who without question had the brainpower to go to college at 9 or 10 - he scored an SAT 1540 at 9, 800 on math and an 800 on the math subject test. But before this we had to pull him out of public school midway through his second grade year because his teacher was literally killing his love of math. The school wouldn't move him up, the teacher wouldn't budge and a teachers assistant cornered my wife and said, "you have to get him out of here". The wife went to war and we moved him into a local catholic school mid-semester and he was off to races. His math teacher was an electrical engineer and her rules were show up, give me all of your attention and try your hardest. Within two years he and two other kids were pounding out multivariable calculus and solving calculus based physics problems. We contemplated very early college but he graduated high school at 16. College at 20 - easily could have finished in three yrs. Medical school at 24.

We know a girl from Frisco TX who took a practice MCAT cold at 14 and made a 26 (old scale obviously) without the benefit even high school chemistry under her belt. Her family "held her back" a bit. She matched into a great medical residency out west last Friday at 22.

My guess is 6 or 8% of kids are needlessly delayed or outright damaged by the slow pace imposed by our cadres per age thinking. Also I'm near certain that if every kids was given close, specific and demanding attention early that number might be 12 or 15% so obviously I'm talking about way more than high IQ kids.

___________________________

I'm an economist. We need a new longwave development or developments to drive innovation and productivity in order to maintain our current overall lifestyle. IMO disrupting our educational status quo might lead to one or some. Playing to the middle certainly hasn't work well.
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Old Yesterday, 09:32 PM
 
168 posts, read 22,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Right on. US schooling is a rigid set of government programs designed towards the middle, rewarding and encouraging mediocrity.

Derivative of our son being a high IQ individual we've met dozens of kids ranging from workhorse overachievers to truly gifted kids like our boy who without question had the brainpower to go to college at 9 or 10 - he scored an SAT 1540 at 9, 800 on math and an 800 on the math subject test. But before this we had to pull him out of public school midway through his second grade year because his teacher was literally killing his love of math. The school wouldn't move him up, the teacher wouldn't budge and a teachers assistant cornered my wife and said, "you have to get him out of here". The wife went to war and we moved him into a local catholic school mid-semester and he was off to races. His math teacher was an electrical engineer and her rules were show up, give me all of your attention and try your hardest. Within two years he and two other kids were pounding out multivariable calculus and solving calculus based physics problems. We contemplated very early college but he graduated high school at 16. College at 20 - easily could have finished in three yrs. Medical school at 24.

We know a girl from Frisco TX who took a practice MCAT cold at 14 and made a 26 (old scale obviously) without the benefit even high school chemistry under her belt. Her family "held her back" a bit. She matched into a great medical residency out west last Friday at 22.

My guess is 6 or 8% of kids are needlessly delayed or outright damaged by the slow pace imposed by our cadres per age thinking. Also I'm near certain that if every kids was given close, specific and demanding attention early that number might be 12 or 15% so obviously I'm talking about way more than high IQ kids.

___________________________

I'm an economist. We need a new longwave development or developments to drive innovation and productivity in order to maintain our current overall lifestyle. IMO disrupting our educational status quo might lead to one or some. Playing to the middle certainly hasn't work well.
Thank you for sharing. You have a right to be proud. How awesome.

It really is a shame the way children are chained to the yoke of age and peer based education in the public school system. I must say I have been favorably impressed by the Montessori method. We home schooled but friends of our did the Montessori method and had very favorable results.
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