U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-10-2016, 10:01 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,713 posts, read 64,172,365 times
Reputation: 68511

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddSteel View Post
Skipping grades doesn't seem to be all that common today, at least not like it was say 40 or 50 years ago.

The thing is, if your child does skip a grade or two, they might be starting college at 15 or 16.
There's nothing wrong with starting college at 16. If they start at 15, that would mean they skipped 3 grades.

At the university I went to, there was a special program for gifted school kids; they were allowed to take university classes no matter their age. There was a kid who I think was 12 years old in a Chinese language class I took. It was fascinating to watch his mind at work. All the other students would make errors when the teacher called on them to translate a sentence, but that kid never made a mistake. He made it look effortless. Utterly fascinating.

It's not quite as common now as it used to be, because sometime around the 90's, I think, some educators or psychologists or someone raised the issue of being "socially immature" if you skip kids. So parents worried about that, and held their kids back (meaning: didn't let them follow their inclinations and go to the higher class level.) I think that's a non-issue. Every class has kids who fit in and those who don't, or who form their own group, or whatever. College is full of kids who came from all manner of families; they can be 18 or 19, but if they came from a family that over-protected them, they're going to be socially immature. It's part of human variability. I've seen 12-year-olds who were more socially mature than some 18-year-olds.

IMO the important thing is to keep kids minds' stimulated. If they get bored at school, they could well lose interest in academics altogether, and could slack off and start getting into trouble. I've known cases where that happened, too. The 16-year-olds I've known who were in college did fine.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 05-10-2016 at 10:11 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-11-2016, 12:01 AM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 5,732,020 times
Reputation: 4508
Based on personal experience, my answer is no.

It has nothing to do with the academics, I always did well in those. It has to do with maturity levels, and trust me, that comes into play in high school. I was 16 when I graduated out of grade 12, and most of my classmates were 18, driving, legally going to the bar, having sex regularly and according to them, often, some girls got pregnant so obviously something was going on.

Me, I had barely started dating, and to me the grade 10's, who were my age group, were to vapid, and my fellow classmates were too old.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2016, 01:05 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,713 posts, read 64,172,365 times
Reputation: 68511
Quote:
Originally Posted by cupper3 View Post
Based on personal experience, my answer is no.

It has nothing to do with the academics, I always did well in those. It has to do with maturity levels, and trust me, that comes into play in high school. I was 16 when I graduated out of grade 12, and most of my classmates were 18, driving, legally going to the bar, having sex regularly and according to them, often, some girls got pregnant so obviously something was going on.

Me, I had barely started dating, and to me the grade 10's, who were my age group, were to vapid, and my fellow classmates were too old.
That was a blessing in disguise, OP. Are you actually complaining that you weren't having a wild sex life and getting girls pregnant? lol Why would you envy people like that, or feel left out of a crazy scene like that? Who needs that?

I graduated early, too, and it never bothered me. I was never interested in driving, never interested in alcohol, and certainly not in getting pregnant, wow! As long as you didn't fit in with the kids who were your age, anyway, why not advance as fast as you can, and go on to college? There's a much greater variety of personalities in college, usually, so you can always find someone to fit in with. And the course offerings are much broader, lots of exciting topics to study. So much better than HS! You're actually a good example of a kid who should skip a grade, since you felt your peer group was vapid. (Frankly, the older kids at your school don't sound any less vapid.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2016, 01:33 AM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 5,732,020 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
That was a blessing in disguise, OP. Are you actually complaining that you weren't having a wild sex life and getting girls pregnant? lol Why would you envy people like that, or feel left out of a crazy scene like that? Who needs that?

I graduated early, too, and it never bothered me. I was never interested in driving, never interested in alcohol, and certainly not in getting pregnant, wow! As long as you didn't fit in with the kids who were your age, anyway, why not advance as fast as you can, and go on to college? There's a much greater variety of personalities in college, usually, so you can always find someone to fit in with. And the course offerings are much broader, lots of exciting topics to study. So much better than HS! You're actually a good example of a kid who should skip a grade, since you felt your peer group was vapid. (Frankly, the older kids at your school don't sound any less vapid.)
LOL... I kind of grew up in the late '60's. You know the theme song, "If you're not with the one you love, love the one you're with".

Yeah, university was a whole new ball game. I know they say that if you remember the late '60's, early '70's you weren't really there, but some of the haze opened up just enough that I do recall the odd situation fondly. We all that certain 'look' back then. This is me chairing some rabble rousing meeting, who knows what we were protesting at the time.

Gotta love them glasses, huh?

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2016, 02:26 AM
 
Location: Buffalo, NY
596 posts, read 332,207 times
Reputation: 854
I skipped third grade back in '94; was asked to skip fourth as well but declined that offer. If left to my own devices, I would've opted to skip them all. From conversations with (older) family members (and my elderly great-aunt had skipped a grade herself, I recall) I got the sense that the practice was more common in earlier times (that perhaps administration were more free to advance 'gifted' kids according to their discretion), but that's hardly an authoritative response from yours truly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2016, 02:29 AM
 
Location: The Netherlands
4,294 posts, read 2,881,254 times
Reputation: 4257
Skip grades? Oh boy no here in NL pensions age was 65 and they make it for 68 as I hear so ... to work more extra nope I wish I can go back to school and repeat few classes
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2016, 07:06 AM
 
Location: East Coast
2,771 posts, read 1,574,518 times
Reputation: 3998
I think it's a bad idea, and if you're in a good school district with ample resources, it's better to have the kids in advanced classes -- or even to take a couple classes at a local college that could be used for both high school and college credit.

Emotional and intellectual maturity is a huge thing that we can't just overlook. I don't think a 15 or 16 year old is at all prepared to handle college life, which is about way more than just the books and lectures. While they may be able to handle the academics, which again, they could do while still at home and still enrolled at a high school), it would be a huge disservice to them to skip out on all the social aspects and personal growth experiences that occur during college.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2016, 08:20 AM
 
143 posts, read 89,063 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
It was not common then either!
It was more common than it is today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2016, 08:20 AM
 
2,582 posts, read 3,142,662 times
Reputation: 6694
My brothers and I all skipped grades. We all did it the same year, when we moved to a new school system, and we were very young. So we didn't know anyone, and no one knew we skipped grades. It worked ok.

I skipped 1st grade. My brothers skipped Kindergarten, and 2nd grade.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2016, 08:23 AM
 
143 posts, read 89,063 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
There's nothing wrong with starting college at 16. If they start at 15, that would mean they skipped 3 grades.
The thing is, if you start college at that age than at that age you might not be living with mom and dad, especially if the college you go to is too far away to commute.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top