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Old 05-12-2016, 02:50 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU
4,129 posts, read 3,228,851 times
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My grandpa skipped 2 grades back in the 40s. He was pretty smart (still is) but I imagine that small Texas town didn't have much in the way of opportunities for students ahead of the curve compared to now. I took a lot of advanced classes and AP courses. I got to stick with my core group of friends. It also allows for students to pursue their strong points. An average language students that excels in math can remain at a, for example, 9th grade level while taking a math class that a 10th or 11th grader might take.
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Old 05-12-2016, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Southwest
1,533 posts, read 945,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddSteel View Post
Supposedly in the old days really good students would sometimes skip grades in school when they were attending the grades K-12. From what I know they don't do that much anymore and instead a really good student, particularly in high school, might be taking more advanced classes or AP classes. Maybe they should go back to skipping grades, just a thought.
I say the student should stay in the same grade and take those advanced/AP classes. I skipped a grade in high school and have mild feelings of regret. I wasn't with my original classmates and it may have been better to stay due to being more intellectually advanced but not as socially advanced.

Ted Kaczynski, the convicted Unabomber, skipped two grades in school.
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Old 05-12-2016, 04:39 PM
 
Location: NJ/NY
10,634 posts, read 16,220,722 times
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I skipped the 2nd grade, back in the early 80s. I was reading full books in K and counting to a thousand. There were a lot of social issues, I feel looking back. It probably would have been better if they instead developed some better advanced classes for grammar school.
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Old 05-12-2016, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Cary NC
1,042 posts, read 1,362,751 times
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My daughter was advanced, high IQ, I chose not to let her skip a grade and never regretted it. I took her to the library every week and she would check out lots of books. At school she was very confident always knew the answer and enjoyed helping out classmates. There may have been times she was bored but that is a good lesson too sometimes life is boring, I didn't mind if she wasn't challenged every minute. She did well academically in college and well socially.
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Old 05-12-2016, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Buffalo, NY
596 posts, read 332,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newtoli View Post
I skipped the 2nd grade, back in the early 80s. I was reading full books in K and counting to a thousand. There were a lot of social issues, I feel looking back. It probably would have been better if they instead developed some better advanced classes for grammar school.
In 1st grade, there were three different reading groups for my class. These groups were divided up according to ability (roughly, I'm sure). However, my 1st grade teacher, whom even now I remember fondly even though I recall her saying that she voted for HW Bush the day after Election Day in '92 (which of course meant nothing to me at the time, haha), had me in a 4th grade-level reading group of one. While the other kids were navigating those 32-page picture books, I read 'Maniac Magee' and 'Sideways Stories from Wayside School', both of which I really enjoyed. Massive props to Mrs. Peterson of the now-defunct 14 Holy Helpers School in West Seneca, NY
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Old 05-12-2016, 05:10 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
2,488 posts, read 1,716,852 times
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i skipped 9th grade following a special program that compressed 8&9th grades into 1 year. After I started 10th grade, I was only an average student.

My 3 kids are fairly smart in their individual ways but I would not let them skip if they were given the option.
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Old 05-12-2016, 05:13 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,869 posts, read 64,312,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddSteel View Post
There's nothing wrong with that, its just that you're without parents. When you're at school grades k-12 the teachers are in loco parentis which means they're in the place of your parents. Same thing with babysitters. When you're in college though, living in the dorms, you don't have your parents with you and you don't have anybody to take the place of your parents either. You're effectively on your own. Now as for me, Im all for a 15 or 16 year old living like that if they're ready for it but some people might think thats too young for that.
I've always found those age designations pretty arbitrary. By 17 or 18, even 16, a lot of kids are ready to be on their own, and have their own inner compass. Think about it; what difference could there possibly be, for most kids, between 17 and 18? A kid's 18, but just because they haven't graduated from HS and gone to college yet, he's still treated like a child at home, or many parents would treat him (or her) that way, while his 17-year-old friend, who finished HS early or had skipped a grade earlier in life, or both, is already in college, being responsible for himself/herself, coming and going as s/he pleases. A lot of kids are ready for that by 16 or 17, and it's not fair to continue treating them like children just because they're still living at home. Other kids aren't ready for it even at 20.

Colleges used to have in loco parentis policies. Those were chucked, because they weren't popular. IDK, maybe in view of so many date rape cases at universities, that should be reinstated. Or maybe the schools don't want the responsibility and potential liability.
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Old 05-12-2016, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,023 posts, read 98,892,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I've always found those age designations pretty arbitrary. By 17 or 18, even 16, a lot of kids are ready to be on their own, and have their own inner compass. Think about it; what difference could there possibly be, for most kids, between 17 and 18? A kid's 18, but just because they haven't graduated from HS and gone to college yet, he's still treated like a child at home, or many parents would treat him (or her) that way, while his 17-year-old friend, who finished HS early or had skipped a grade earlier in life, or both, is already in college, being responsible for himself/herself, coming and going as s/he pleases. A lot of kids are ready for that by 16 or 17, and it's not fair to continue treating them like children just because they're still living at home. Other kids aren't ready for it even at 20.

Colleges used to have in loco parentis policies. Those were chucked, because they weren't popular. IDK, maybe in view of so many date rape cases at universities, that should be reinstated. Or maybe the schools don't want the responsibility and potential liability.
When the age of majority was changed to 18, in loco parentis no longer applied.
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Old 05-12-2016, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
3,004 posts, read 1,413,196 times
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I know a kid who is 15 and in 11th grade. Since we are in a charter school he enjoys life but he won't be able to drive till early senior year. Kids still skip grades nowadays it is just mostly in elementary (He skipped 5th and 7th grade), I also know a girl and a guy who is 17 in 10th grade, they started school late for two different reasons. They could have started driving by the end of 8th grade. I will say most kids who skip grades it is either to catch up because they started school late or their parents are immigrants who want to push their kids to excel even more and think skipping a grade is part of that process. Or are like me and could have skipped elementary grades because in all honesty the elementary system in America is horribly easy, (I was a year ahead when I first moved here from Nigeria were I was considered a slightly above average student back in Nigeria).

Last edited by NigerianNightmare; 05-12-2016 at 06:42 PM..
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Old 05-12-2016, 06:28 PM
 
14,817 posts, read 18,832,006 times
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Bad idea,
What's the point of having a kid start college at 16 and then is hanging out with 18-25 year old people that are always drinking
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