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Old 12-10-2016, 12:22 PM
Status: "Welcome Governor Polis!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,700 posts, read 100,232,081 times
Reputation: 32156

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^^Thank you for the kind words. I do respect your opinions as well.
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Old 12-10-2016, 01:56 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
7,055 posts, read 4,385,300 times
Reputation: 9049
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Very true. And one of the big reasons being self-taught is rarely effective is that there is no balance when one chooses what they want to learn.
Can you elaborate?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I think that some people can be mostly self-taught. However, most people cannot be. There is a gradation.

If everyone could be self-taught, then the world would become filled with geniuses pretty quickly.
We know that is not the case.
Eh, not really. There are people who see the appeal of autodidacticism and are capable and willing to put in the time and work into their chosen field(s) of study. This doesn't necessarily point to exceptionally high IQ, only the desire, discipline and drive to pursue self-studies. This needn't apply only to traditional academics. It can apply to a variety of interests, right? What about self-taught artists, writers and musicians?

Heck, three of my past exes are self-taught software developers. Two work professionally in their field, and the other a part time computer programmer and coder.

My husband taught himself to play the guitar and is a self-taught illustrator. I'm a self-taught photographer. All of the areas of interest I'm very proficient in are fields I dedicated over a decade to intense study. Not merely casual or superficial. I've also retained far more information through self-studies than any other method of instruction.

I think like many things some people have a knack or aptitude for certain styles of learning, whereas others it may take a particular subject or two to spark interest, and once the interest is sparked and they see "results," it further fuels their interests in other areas. The latter applies to me. I wasn't very disciplined about studies during my adolescence. It wasn't until I took a more serious interest in doctrinal studies/theology that I started to really enjoy self-directed learning.

Is self-directed and self-regulated learning for everyone? No. I wasn't nearly as disciplined about actual studies of anything more than fun stuff when I was in school. I do cultivate (nurture) a love and appreciation for learning with my children. My 12 year old decided on her own to learn more about Japanese culture after she took a serious interest in anime/manga and started drawing anime and comics. Then she started teaching herself Japanese. It was a natural progression into more traditional studies. My 10 year old has always been fascinated with animals, geology and archaeology. It started with reading books, then turned to watching documentaries, watching tons of youtube videos, playing with rocks/minerals kits, etc. She can tell me a lot about the things she's learned. In the last several months she's taken a more serious interest in the Asatru/Norse tradition (her favorite superhero is Thor) and requested books in this genre.

So, yeah, there are ways to cultivate interest in self-directed learning. It's even possible to be highly proficient in an area or two or more through autodidactic learning. Importance should be placed on critical and objective analysis and learning to examine cognitive biases, as the latter plays a role in our learning process and the information we come into contact with and how we assess it. Colleges award credits for passing exams that assess college-level learning without taking courses. That would suggest these students either studied to test out, or pursued prior college-level learning.
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Old 12-10-2016, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
19,866 posts, read 9,377,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphysique View Post
Can you elaborate?



...
Sure. At university I didn't want to take lithology and mineralogy and structural geology. I wanted to concentrate on landforms and paleontology. But to get the degree, I had to take required courses, some of which I wouldn't have selected if it had been up to me.
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Old 12-11-2016, 12:24 PM
 
Location: midwest
1,359 posts, read 976,292 times
Reputation: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
Can you or will you? I suppose you CAN but few WILL.
But what would happen if we had a good National Recommended Reading List with explanations for each book?

So why don't educators suggest such a thing?

The Tyranny of Words by Stuart Chase
- - - - learn how words help and hinder learning and thinking

Teach Yourself Electricity and Electronics by Stan Gibilisco
- - - - this title is self-explanatory

The majority of books are crap.

psik

Last edited by psikeyhackr; 12-11-2016 at 12:40 PM..
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Old 12-12-2016, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 30,091,127 times
Reputation: 14520
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Very true. And one of the big reasons being self-taught is rarely effective is that there is no balance when one chooses what they want to learn.

It's also difficult to choose what to learn when you don't have the big picture. When you are educated by others you are learning from people who know more than you do and know what direction you should go. You can easily miss the big picture if you are only self taught.
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Old 12-12-2016, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 30,091,127 times
Reputation: 14520
Quote:
Originally Posted by psikeyhackr View Post
But what would happen if we had a good National Recommended Reading List with explanations for each book?

So why don't educators suggest such a thing?

The Tyranny of Words by Stuart Chase
- - - - learn how words help and hinder learning and thinking

Teach Yourself Electricity and Electronics by Stan Gibilisco
- - - - this title is self-explanatory

The majority of books are crap.

psik


You need more than books to be truly educated. You also need discussion, debate, experience and to be forced out of your comfort zone. Books represent only one form of learning and not necessarily the best. You need discussion groups to go with those books and practice. Sometimes you need to be forced to study things you would not have chosen to study on your own. Kind of like they do in college. Can you imagine letting someone operate on you who was self educated by only reading books? Would the fact he/she read the recommended books be of any comfort to you?
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Old 12-12-2016, 11:54 PM
 
1,913 posts, read 2,757,747 times
Reputation: 2643
We are homeschooling (secular) our oldest and have discovered that all of the tools and content necessary for a rigorous education can be found on the internet for free. However, my well-educated husband is serving as a tutor and guide, the same as any teacher. Additionally, my son takes a few soft classes at the local homeschool center with his peers because part of training for life is about cultivating communication and collaborative project skills. Thus, I believe having expert guidance and peer debate is integral to full implementation of the tools -- this is typically what a traditional learning environment aims to provide. However, I also believe kids/adults need room to dive deeply into some of their own self-identified interests and not simply become passive, spoon fed learners. Traditional schools often do not have the time or ability to offer a flexible curriculum until graduate school.

Last edited by west seattle gal; 12-13-2016 at 12:06 AM..
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Old 12-17-2016, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,160 posts, read 32,875,903 times
Reputation: 50584
I wouldn't have the discipline. It's the same reason I wouldn't work at home. Too easily distracted. I also prefer a competitive environment.
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Old 12-17-2016, 02:59 PM
 
16,109 posts, read 13,505,721 times
Reputation: 20091
Quote:
Originally Posted by psikeyhackr View Post
But what would happen if we had a good National Recommended Reading List with explanations for each book?

So why don't educators suggest such a thing?

The Tyranny of Words by Stuart Chase
- - - - learn how words help and hinder learning and thinking

Teach Yourself Electricity and Electronics by Stan Gibilisco
- - - - this title is self-explanatory

The majority of books are crap.

psik
Because many, maybe even most subjects cannot be mastered by simply reading a book.
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Old 01-15-2019, 09:15 PM
 
1,859 posts, read 1,341,230 times
Reputation: 2675
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Because many, maybe even most subjects cannot be mastered by simply reading a book.
Luckily we have YouTube! to complement that book learning! The internet makes it possible to learn pretty much anything. And the need to actually attend a brick-and-mortar school in order to earn a degree is slowly falling out of style thanks to the web.
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