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Old 02-16-2019, 08:39 AM
 
89 posts, read 9,856 times
Reputation: 147

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Quote:
Originally Posted by education explorer View Post
My own personal experience says yes to the question.

I already had basic skills (reading, writing, math and others). I worked at a place selling newspaper trial subscriptions. This is something that's not taught at school.

I was given a script to work with (which included "selling points" - an euphemism for objection rebuttals). Through serendipity and scientific means, I've taught myself to sell and I mean sell well. Since my thinking was outside of the box, I know that my knowledge would never be duplicated at a selling school. I can say that I heavily tested my ideas with great success.

Do you have any personal experience where you feel that teaching yourself is far better than what you could learn at a school?

EdX

I would recommend doing both at the same time. Use self-education to build a specific skill-set related to your degree track. Pursue a degree that has lots of jobs and a strong hiring trend in the real-world. I work in academia so also keep this in mind, a lot of academics have never held a job outside of academia and are really clueless when it comes to the job market outside of the bubble of higher ed. I can't count the number times I have heard someone in academia say major in this (useless major with no real job prospects). Do your own research.
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Old 02-16-2019, 03:05 PM
 
Location: midwest
1,377 posts, read 989,050 times
Reputation: 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by heart84 View Post
I would recommend doing both at the same time. Use self-education to build a specific skill-set related to your degree track. Pursue a degree that has lots of jobs and a strong hiring trend in the real-world.
I am in electronics/computers and I agree with that completely. An inexpensive school might not be that good but the technology and the problems you have to solve on the job do not care where you got your knowledge.

Some online/computer classes might be far better than the school but employers may not know that.

https://www.udemy.com/crash-course-e...nd-pcb-design/
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Old 02-18-2019, 09:43 AM
 
Location: The end of the world
451 posts, read 167,600 times
Reputation: 351
A college education can not be beat in anyway. Only equal is somebody like your wife/girlfriend your father/mother your older sibling kicking your arse, with a pistol held behind you, and somebody on all fours with knee-pads just to get you to study. That is what it is really like self-education. You cant be working a slave job with odd hours and intensive labor You can't be living in la-la-land inside your imagination It is one of the $#$#@!$ things to do when your blinded by bs around you.
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Old Today, 03:40 AM
 
2 posts
Reputation: 10
If you wanna study abroad, UK and Germany is not the only option. Try Poland, for example.
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