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Old 08-06-2017, 04:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
Me, either. It sounds as if the term is used now because "retention" appears to have a negative connotation with parents and educators.

It's only in the last couple of years here on CD that I've heard it referred to as "red shirting." Our son's birthday is close to the cut off and even though he passed the test to enter kindergarten, the teachers recommending holding him back a year. Definitely a whole lot more mature than the other kids in his classes all through school. The positives have been a higher level of maturity in each class year and he's been a natural leader throughout his school years. The negatives have been mostly being lumped with the younger kids in some activities and then hitting the age limit for some youth activities ahead of his classmates.


Overall it leans toward the positive due to the leadership role he assumed and developed.
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Old 08-06-2017, 05:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stuckcheese View Post
No offense, but AS is a terrible reason to redshirt. My parents redshirted me(July 3rd bday) for the very same reason and all that happened was that my problems got addressed a year later. A child with Asperger's Syndrome is already going to have enough to separate them from their classmates without being a year older.
This was back in the 1970s and he never was diagnosed. He did not have any problems with *younger* kids, but as an athletic boy who was also very short, he had problems with some kids. His problems were never addressed by the schools because academically, he was way ahead of everyone. Luckily, the school he went to allowed him to work ahead in math and science. He is now a successful chemical engineer and loves his work. He travels all over the world for his career.

With my granddaughter, she always got along better with younger kids and still does even now at 15. We did not hold her out a year, but I think she could have benefited from it. She is very bright and we only had a few problems with bullying in k-4 (and the school handled it well) and a few in 5th grade, but that was partly because of dealing with many issues and with the entitled gifted population in her school.
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Old 08-06-2017, 06:15 PM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
2,735 posts, read 2,174,470 times
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Lightbulb Distribution of birth month is not uniform

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Because the bold is untrue. Whatever the cutoff, some parents with kids with birthdays in the last 3 months before the cutoff consider redshirting them.
You'd hope school districts would take the distribution of birthdates into consideration when setting the cutoff, perhaps setting it just after a "low birth rate" month:

Mod cut removed copyrighted graphic - please just post link

Last edited by toobusytoday; 10-04-2017 at 03:33 PM..
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Pacific Beach/San Diego
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I have an April son who we might have held back for maturity reasons if it wasn't for the fact that he's the tallest kid in class (10 inches taller than the average six-year-old; 99% in height). He did run into problems for being immature as a Kindergartener. My daughter misses the deadline by 3 days in California, which means we'll be paying an extra $15,000 for being three days late in birth.
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
My son's birthday placed him in the final 3 months before the cutoff, thus being one of the younger ones in his class. We sent him to Kindergarten on schedule. He was very rambunctious and somewhat immature at the time. Academically he was doing fine, but the teacher convinced us that we should send him next year to Junior First-Grade. This was a special program our school had at the time in between K and First Grade for kids like my son or those struggling somewhat academically. It was First Grade at a slower pace. After Junior First Grade they would then progress to First Grade with the classmates being the kids from the original class below.


Junior First Grade was a fabulous program and it helped give kids an extra year to adjust to school. I'm surprised that it isn't utilized more today.


Rather than holding your child back before Kindergarten, going on time and having the Junior First Grade option orientates them into the school system and gives them the academic boost they need.
So if the pace was the only difference, not the curriculum, then wasn't it effectively repeating a grade? If you did all the same stuff for two years running, albeit paced differently?
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
13,693 posts, read 7,034,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
My son's birthday placed him in the final 3 months before the cutoff, thus being one of the younger ones in his class. We sent him to Kindergarten on schedule. He was very rambunctious and somewhat immature at the time. Academically he was doing fine, but the teacher convinced us that we should send him next year to Junior First-Grade. This was a special program our school had at the time in between K and First Grade for kids like my son or those struggling somewhat academically. It was First Grade at a slower pace. After Junior First Grade they would then progress to First Grade with the classmates being the kids from the original class below.


Junior First Grade was a fabulous program and it helped give kids an extra year to adjust to school. I'm surprised that it isn't utilized more today.


Rather than holding your child back before Kindergarten, going on time and having the Junior First Grade option orientates them into the school system and gives them the academic boost they need.
I would assume it's not that common because most school districts tend to be pretty hard up for money and paying for an additional year of school would take a big chunk out of the budget.

As for the basic question, I have a son with a July birthday and I really agonized over this decision. He's low-average in terms of size, and especially when he was younger, he was definitely behind in terms of socialization. But he's academically gifted and both his preschool teacher and the elementary school he was going to were 100% sure that he should start on time. I kept asking about it, even into 2nd grade or so, just to get confirmation I had done the right thing, and all of his teachers said he was right where he should be.

He's now an incoming 8th grade honors student and you know what, he's still a bit socially immature but academically ahead. At some point, he won't be compared to people who just happen to be randomly age-matched, and he'll be fine.

Last edited by emm74; 08-06-2017 at 08:08 PM..
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Then let me say, with all due respect, that you have not been paying attention to the issue.
No, it really is exclusively used within the context of collegiate level athletics, here. Opting to delay kindergarten entry isn't uncommon, but that isn't verbiage that's used.

With all due respect.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
You'd hope school districts would take the distribution of birthdates into consideration when setting the cutoff, perhaps setting it just after a "low birth rate" month:
What is your chart from?

From what I've read, there is some difference in distribution by region.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:53 PM
Status: "On Break" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,413 posts, read 91,889,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
No, it really is exclusively used within the context of collegiate level athletics, here. Opting to delay kindergarten entry isn't uncommon, but that isn't verbiage that's used.

With all due respect.
My school district was using that term for holding kids back 20+ years ago. As I said, I had someone argue with me that it was NOT an athletic term.

I couldn't find anything from that far back on the web, but here's an article from the New York Times from 2007, ten years ago now. Standarized Testing - Education - Schools - Test Scores - The New York Times

"60 Minutes" did a story about it in 2012.
Redshirting: Holding your child back for the better? - CBS News
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:55 PM
 
Location: White House, TN
4,776 posts, read 3,135,451 times
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Why can't we make the cut-off turning 5 by December 31 and let the PARENTS decide if they want to start their late-year babies at 4 turning 5 or 5 turning 6? The parent will know better than anyone whether to redshirt their July baby, start their December baby at 4 turning 5, or anything in between.

Of course I think that absent some disability the vast majority of summer babies should start kindergarten having just turned 5. The redshirting question should mostly apply to October, November, and December babies.

For example, my birthday is Dec. 25, 1992, so I would have made a Dec. 31 cutoff by six days, but I did best to be in class of 2011 due to my Asperger's and extreme closeness to such a cut-off, on the other hand a very mature person born Dec. 25, 1992 may have been best to graduate in 2010.

The cut-off in my area was Sept. 30 for my class (it's been moved back to Aug. 15) and in high school I noticed little if any difference between the Aug/Sept babies and older babies.

Also the school years are starting too early in some areas. Some places they start in late JULY, and in many places early August. It should be late August, nearly September by the time school starts.
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