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Old 08-07-2017, 10:26 AM
 
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Some things about kindergarten entry dates. Those who talk about a December 31st date are out of the norm.

Kindergarten Entrance Age

Note that while it used to be true that cutoffs were in December only Connecticut remains after October now and only 8 states have cutoffs in October. Most have cutoffs in August or September. In a few, local districts decide their own cutoff dates.

Quote:
Kindergarten Entrance Age: The date by which a student must be five years old in order to attend kindergarten.

Jul. 31 – Hawaii (effective 2014-15), Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota
Aug. 1 – Arkansas, Indiana
Aug. 15 – Tennessee (effective 2014-15)
Aug. 31 – Arizona, Delaware, Kansas, New Mexico, North Carolina, Washington
Sept. 1 – Alabama, Alaska, California (effective 2014-15), Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin (19 states)
Sept. 10 – Montana
Sept. 15 – Iowa, Wyoming
Sept. 30 – District of Columbia, Louisiana, Nevada, Virginia
Oct. 1 – Colorado, Kentucky (Aug. 1 in 2017-18), Michigan (effective 2014-2015)
Oct. 15 – Maine
Jan. 1 (of the school year) – Connecticut
Local education agencies decide (the state may set a date range) – Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont
Does Changing Kindergarten Entry Cutoff Age Help Improve Educational Achievement? – Chicago Policy Review

Quote:
A recent study conducted by Jason Fletcher and Taehoon Kim explores the effects of state kindergarten entry age policies on children’s educational achievement and test score dispersion, which represents how spread out data are from an average state test score in fourth, eighth, and twelfth grades. To measure students’ educational achievement, the researchers used the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scores in Reading and Math in fourth and eighth grades, as well as the ACT and SAT scores in Science, English, Math, and Reading in twelfth grade.
Quote:
Earlier cutoffs generally mean that students are older when they begin school. This research shows a positive impact of an earlier kindergarten entry cutoff date among fourth and eighth graders, but the impact gradually fades for students by twelfth grade.
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Old 08-07-2017, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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The list is incorrect. Colorado is one of several states with "local control", allowing districts to set their own dare. Interesting article, too:. https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/co/2...cut-off-dates/
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Old 08-07-2017, 11:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
The list is incorrect. Colorado is one of several states with "local control", allowing districts to set their own dare. Interesting article, too:. https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/co/2...cut-off-dates/
Local education agencies decide (the state may set a date range) Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont

I guess they missed Colorado.
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Old 08-07-2017, 11:47 AM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
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Question Planned pregnancy and month-of-birth? Do parents plan birthdate based on school admission cutoff dates?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
You'd hope school districts would take the distribution of birthdates into consideration when setting the cutoff, perhaps setting it just after a "low birth rate" month:
What is your chart from?
From what I've read, there is some difference in distribution by region.
Raw data is available at https://github.com/fivethirtyeight/d.../master/births
The graph uses births by day from 1994 to 2014, across the entire USA, there is some regional variability.
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Old 08-07-2017, 12:07 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TristramShandy View Post
I have an April son who we might have held back for maturity reasons if it wasn't for the fact that he's the tallest kid in class (10 inches taller than the average six-year-old; 99% in height). He did run into problems for being immature as a Kindergartener. My daughter misses the deadline by 3 days in California, which means we'll be paying an extra $15,000 for being three days late in birth.
Does your school district offer transitional kindergarten? According to California Education Code 48000(c), a child is eligible for Transitional Kindergarten if the child will have his or her fifth birthday between September 2 and December 2.
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Old 08-07-2017, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Pacific Beach/San Diego
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twins4lynn View Post
Does your school district offer transitional kindergarten? According to California Education Code 48000(c), a child is eligible for Transitional Kindergarten if the child will have his or her fifth birthday between September 2 and December 2.
December 5 birthday. And since my wife has MS, we had to have a C-section. I was clueless to the law, so we set it on a Friday, so I didn't have to take off work to be there and the next two days afterwards.
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Old 08-07-2017, 02:03 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TristramShandy View Post
December 5 birthday. :
Gotcha. Birthday right after the transitional kindy cutoff.
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Old 08-07-2017, 02:22 PM
 
Location: White House, TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
And where does that leave the kids who are ready for the way kindergarten is now? I don't know the numbers but a lot of kids enter kindergarten after spending 1 or 2 years in preschool and they have already developed the skills they need.

But what happens after T-1? Aren't those kids going to continue to stay ahead of the non-T-1 kids? At some points, kids who enter school with different degrees of readiness need to be integrated into one classroom. It may as well be in kindergarten where there is more flexibility and a less stringent curriculum.
In my case, we went to normal first grade, then second, so on, until my class graduated in 2011.

I support a Dec. 31 cut-off even though most students born in December probably won't be ready for kindergarten. Some will. Their parents will know better than anyone else. That would be Dec. 2012 for people entering kindergarten this year. Some born in Aug. 2011 weren't ready last year and are ready for the first time this year.

It's okay to have a year and a half span in a class. People grow academically and socially at different rates. When I was in high school, I never noticed any kind of detriment to the people born in Aug/Sept (cut-off was Sept. 30) so I would say that most students born well into the fall would probably be okay starting at 4 turning 5. But once again it all depends on the person.
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Old 08-07-2017, 04:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawa1992 View Post
In my case, we went to normal first grade, then second, so on, until my class graduated in 2011.

I support a Dec. 31 cut-off even though most students born in December probably won't be ready for kindergarten. Some will. Their parents will know better than anyone else. That would be Dec. 2012 for people entering kindergarten this year. Some born in Aug. 2011 weren't ready last year and are ready for the first time this year.

It's okay to have a year and a half span in a class. People grow academically and socially at different rates. When I was in high school, I never noticed any kind of detriment to the people born in Aug/Sept (cut-off was Sept. 30) so I would say that most students born well into the fall would probably be okay starting at 4 turning 5. But once again it all depends on the person.
It is 2017 now, not 2012.

At any rate, I support a Sept 2 cutoff date with testing for readiness for 4 year olds and some provision for them to attend early if they meet the criteria.
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Old 08-07-2017, 05:22 PM
Status: "Prayers for Texas." (set 18 hours ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stuckcheese View Post
Lately, I've been seeing a lot of threads on here about redshirting(delaying a child's entrance to Kindergarten by a year). However, the only kids who are considered for redshirting are kids with fall birthdays in states with winter cutoffs. Since most states have a cutoff of September 1st, and since most kids do not have fall birthdays, there are really very few kids who should be considered for redshirting. So why have there been all these redshirting threads lately?

The term "redshirtng" is a new one for me. Where I am from, it is just called "delaying a child's Kindergarten entrance by a year".

I did it with my son, who was born in Mid - November, which in a district such as ours with a "Five by December 1st" cut off, made sense to me.

He would have been almost a full year younger than many of the children in class. We wanted to give him the competitive edge. It seems to have worked.

He recently graduated from a very competitive college Magna C*m Laude. He did an internship in his field, and is currently working in his field and planning to return to graduate school next year.

Our daughter was born in March. We did not feel the need to do that with her.

There is an older (1990s) book on the subject called "Summer Babies" (or something close) That, and advice from other mothers, and a relative with a "young for his grade" son, helped me to make this choice.

We did not waste the time though, he went to pre-school and we involved him in other intellectually and socially enriching activities.

For the life of me, I don't know what the big rush is.
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