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Old 09-09-2017, 03:55 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
19,866 posts, read 19,210,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonderella View Post
I also have a 10-year old rising 5th grader, with a 1300 Lexile, according to the standardized test results that just came in the mail last week.

I have always let her read whatever she wants. Just because she CAN read at 1300 Lexile level, doesn't mean that that she wants to. Having the technical ability to comprehend something doesn't mean that it would meet her maturity or interest levels. I'm the same way - I'm a college graduate, but that doesn't necessarily mean I want to read War and Peace at the beach.

She's a normal kid who likes Harry Potter, Rick Riordan books, and last week read The Hunger Games. Then, we watched the movie, and talked about the differences, and what parts we liked better in each and why. It was fun for all of us (12-year old also joined in conversation).

When she needs to read higher level texts, she can, but forcing her to do so isn't going to cultivate a love of reading, which to me is much more important than a Lexile level that is already beyond 98% of the kids that age, anyway. I feel confident she will continue to grow in ability without my pushing things on her that don't interest her or aren't appropriate for her emotional maturity level.
Many parents and sadly many teachers turn children off to reading by insisting they read particular books. It takes all kinds of parents and I would never tell a parent how they should train their children but you get my vote.
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Old 09-11-2017, 06:42 AM
 
Location: So Ca
11,059 posts, read 11,120,983 times
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I can't imagine a 5th grade boy liking Great Expectations. With all due respect to Charles Dickens, I thought that was boring in 9th grade. I remember my son and his friends still trading R.L. Stine's "Fear Street" series well into 5th grade (although that was long before the Internet was around and one could read books online).
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Old Yesterday, 06:23 AM
 
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Even if a child ONLY likes to read fiction for fun, it is still beneficial to him or her.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...roves-empathy/
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Old Yesterday, 06:57 AM
 
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If you want your kids to know the difference between "tenet" and "tenant," it would be best to encourage them toward reading. Might even help keep them from ever saying things like "Can you make a copy of that for Jack and I?"

Last edited by 17thAndK; Yesterday at 07:10 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 09:37 AM
 
Location: midwest
1,202 posts, read 770,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
If you want your kids to know the difference between "tenet" and "tenant," it would be best to encourage them toward reading.
How about A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke so they can learn about Plato's Allegory of the Cave explained with infrared radiation. There are books with high density information but most with only low density information so letting kids stumble around at random is rather odd.

The Harry Potter series is SIX MEGABYTES and Rowling uses the word 'wand' 1,500 times. What good is that?
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Old Yesterday, 08:18 PM
 
12,348 posts, read 6,720,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psikeyhackr View Post
How about A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke so they can learn about Plato's Allegory of the Cave explained with infrared radiation. There are books with high density information but most with only low density information so letting kids stumble around at random is rather odd.

The Harry Potter series is SIX MEGABYTES and Rowling uses the word 'wand' 1,500 times. What good is that?
Or how about just suggesting that they read Plato's Republic at some point?
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Old Yesterday, 08:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
Or how about just suggesting that they read Plato's Republic at some point?
Right.

I do not see the harm in allowing a child to read things like Harry Potter or the other millions of fiction books out there. They.are.reading. At the end of the day, that is what I care about.
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Old Yesterday, 08:35 PM
 
12,348 posts, read 6,720,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
Right.

I do not see the harm in allowing a child to read things like Harry Potter or the other millions of fiction books out there. They.are.reading. At the end of the day, that is what I care about.
I agree with you. My comment was really more a response to the nonstop drumbeat of SF books from a previous poster. I've read Plato's Republic and the Harry Potter series and gotten something out of both of them. If a kid wants to read all seven books in the HP series over and over again, I've really no problem with that. I read all sorts of stuff when I was young, and so did my kids. Let them choose. Although they may need some encouragement to take time out for reading, their interests will generally guide them to the appropriate material.
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Old Today, 11:44 AM
 
Location: midwest
1,202 posts, read 770,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
Or how about just suggesting that they read Plato's Republic at some point?
What did Plato say about infrared?

What does infrared have to do with global warming theory?

The world has gotten more complicated since Plato, but that does not mean there is nothing to be learned. It is a problem of relevant information density. Some people think Harry Potter is wothwhile, but it is SIX MEGABYTES. A Fall of Moondust is less than Half a Megabyte. I will have to check Plato's Rebublic, never read it.

The Republic, by Plato
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1497/1497-h/1497-h.htm
1.2 Megabytes

My bad, that includes what the author claims is an Introduction and Analysis. The Republic is only 640 Kilobytes.

The Internet is SO Cool!

Last edited by psikeyhackr; Today at 12:13 PM..
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